It's Time to Forgive and Forget the NFL Lockout

It's Time to Forgive and Forget the NFL Lockout

All that matters is they got it done.

Forget the speech from NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell where he talked about winning back the fans. Ignore all the tough rhetoric from fans who threatened various boycotts and demonstrations. By getting a deal done, and in time that a season was not missed, even shortened or delayed for that matter, the owners and players did the only thing that truly counted.

They gave football back to the people.

There are plenty of folks who understandably will still be peeved about the process. For over four months—and really, much longer than that—a battle often labeled as "Millionaires vs. Billionaires" was waged chiefly through carefully crafted public relations messages rather than at the bargaining table. The cherry on top, a $10 billion dollar prize, every penny of which either directly or indirectly comes from average people like you and me.

Even to a less cynical person, it all came off as greedy, and selfish, and... well that's because it was, actually. As much as we may hate to admit it, professional football isn't merely a game that grown men get paid to play. It's a business, and is subject to disagreements over how the money gets shared from time to time.

So with all that finally over and done with, and apparently for the next decade at that, I say, "No harm, no foul."
 
Let's try to keep things in perspective. The NFL hasn't missed games or played a shortened season as a result of labor issues since 1987. In that timeframe, Major League Baseball lost a World Series, the NHL lost an entire season, and the NBA is currently embroiled in its own lockout limbo that will almost certainly leave arenas dark into 2012.

Again, the NFL didn't miss anything. The off-season was funky, and a nationally televised scrimmage preseason game was the lone scheduling casualty. Other than that, the lockout has left no measurable impact on the fans from a pure numbers standpoint.

It remains to be seen whether September will feature sloppy football and an increase in injuries, as some observers suggest might be the result of a long summer off. Those things are certainly possible. Players will be out of shape, and free agents will join their new clubs in camp later.

But I'll take sloppy football over no football though, even over delayed football, or less football. Once Labor Day has come and gone, it will be pigskin season again. For the fans, that ought to be enough.

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

ST. LOUIS -- Vincent Trocheck scored with just under 5 seconds remaining to lift the Florida Panthers to a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Monday night.

Jonathan Marchessault also scored and James Reimer stopped 26 shots to help the Panthers complete a 5-0 road trip -- their first perfect trip of at least that many games in franchise history.

Reimer has won five straight decisions and has not lost in regulation since Jan. 7 against Boston, going 6-0-1 since.

The Panthers moved into a tie with Boston for third place in the Atlantic Division, but have the edge because they have a game in hand on the Bruins.

Kyle Brodziak, playing for the second time after missing 10 games due to a broken foot, scored for the Blues and Jake Allen finished with 31 saves. St. Louis lost its second straight since winning six in a row (see full recap).

Coyotes use three-goal 1st period to beat Ducks
GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Radim Vrbata capped Arizona's three-goal first period and the Coyotes held on for 3-2 victory over the Anaheim Ducks on Monday night.

Christian Dvorak and Jakob Chychrun also scored for Arizona, and starting goalie Mike Smith had 27 saves before leaving about 4 1/2 minutes into the third period after a collision in the net. Marek Langhamer helped kill a power play after being pressed into action for his NHL debut and stopped six of the seven shots he faced.

The Coyotes have won four of their last six.

Langhamer gave up Ryan Getzlaf's second goal of the night with 26.8 seconds to play, but thwarted two quality shots in the final seconds.

Jonathan Bernier gave up three goals on six shots in the first period for the Ducks. John Gibson came on to start the second and stopped all 14 shots he faced (see full recap).

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid trusts the Process, more so than anyone — the process of patience.

After sitting out two whole seasons because of foot injuries, Embiid learned the importance of patience the hard way.

Appearing on NBA TV's Open Court, Joel Embiid opened up about how he reaggravated the fracture in his foot that cost him the 2015-16 season.

"I didn't know how to deal with patience," Embiid said on the roundtable discussion. "I just wanted to do stuff, that's why I think I needed a second surgery, because after my first one, I just wanted to play basketball again. I just wanted to be on the court and I pushed through what I wasn't supposed to.

"At one point I thought about quitting. I just wanted to come back home and just forget everything."

Embiid goes on to discuss the Sixers' turnaround this season and his mindset during his recovery. Watch the full clip below. 

Embiid also said he models his game after Hakeem Olajuwon.