Jason Akeson doesn’t deserve to be portrayed as goat

Jason Akeson doesn’t deserve to be portrayed as goat

If the Philadelphia Flyers eventually lose their first-round playoff series with the New York Rangers as they did Game 1, Jason Akeson’s four-minute high-sticking penalty will live in infamy as one of the turning points.

Should the orange and black go on to win, the penalty and resulting outcome will be as good as forgotten. Or, should Akeson ever develop into a productive NHL player, the transgression might turn out to be nothing more than a footnote in his career. Maybe.

If the Flyers are knocked out—especially in six or seven—the name Akeson will forever become a part of Philly sports lore. Only his having a hand in winning a future Stanley Cup here could erase that.

Otherwise, people will always wonder how a player who had not dressed until the final day of the regular season, who had only two career NHL games under his belt, found himself on the ice in the third period of a tie game during the Stanley Cup Playoffs. They’ll ask how Akeson could make such a stupid, careless mistake, never mind he just lost his balance and the high stick was clearly an accident.

The passage of time will undoubtedly forget Akeson was actually the best, most active forward on the ice that night.

Revisionist history won’t recall the ineffectiveness of Claude Giroux and the captain’s top line. Akeson along with Michael Raffl paced the stagnant Philly offense with three shots each, each more than the entire G line combined.

Akeson’s blunder will be talked about as if killing off at least half the power play wasn’t an option. One day, it will seem almost as if the Flyers didn’t go the first seven minutes without a shot on goal, or the entire third period with only one, or 15 total for the whole game.

Jason Akeson will just be that dude who clumsily whacked Carl Hagelin in the face while falling down. And it just happened to draw blood, an arbitrary rule that causes a double minor. And the Rangers scored on both ends of it to seal the Flyers’ fate.

Yeah, the kid messed up. He got overly aggressive and used poor technique, a combination that directly led to the mistake, a penalty in a spot Philadelphia could ill-afford one. Akeson doesn’t get left off the hook for showing poor judgment.

The stick wasn’t the reason the Flyers lost though. Nor was Ray Emery starting in goal in place of Steve Mason, out with an upper-body injury.

New York plain dominated the game from start to finish. Akeson just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. The perfect scapegoat.

It will be interesting to see whether head coach Craig Berube has the fortitude to go with the 23-year-old in Game 2, or again at all this postseason.

It wasn’t like he was the only player wearing orange and black who appeared to have his skates laced up tight or anything. Jason Akeson was just the rookie who made the dumb rookie mistake that predictably brought down the entire house of cards, the one that was leaning already.

Drexel falls to James Madison in potential CAA Tournament preview

Drexel falls to James Madison in potential CAA Tournament preview

BOX SCORE

Jackson Kent and Tom Vodanovich combined to score 31 points and James Madison held off Drexel late to secure a 70-64 victory Thursday night.

The game could be a preview of a first-round match-up in the Colonial Athletic Association Tournament. With one game left in the regular season, James Madison (9-21, 7-10) is the No. 7 seed and Drexel (9-21, 3-14) has locked up the No. 10 seed. Those seeds meet in the first round, with the winner facing the No. 2 seed in the second round.

Sammy Mojica hit a 3-pointer with :32 left to get the Dragons within four, 66-62, but Shakir Brown and Joey McLean each hit a pair of free throws to seal the victory.

Kent hit 6 of 11 from the floor and tallied 16 points with eight rebounds to lead the Dukes. Vodanovich added 15 points.

Kurk Lee and Mojica both scored 18 points off the Dragons' bench.

Conspiracy charge added for 3 former Penn State administrators

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Conspiracy charge added for 3 former Penn State administrators

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- A Pennsylvania judge on Thursday allowed prosecutors to add a conspiracy charge against three former Penn State administrators, increasing their possible penalty if convicted of crimes for their handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

Judge John Boccabella granted a request by the attorney general's office to tack on a related conspiracy count to the charges of endangering the welfare of children.

Prosecutors said each felony count carries up to 7 years in prison and a $15,000 fine.

Jury selection is scheduled for March 20 in Harrisburg in the case of former university president Graham Spanier, former vice president Gary Schultz and former athletic director Tim Curley.

The defendants sought permission last week from Boccabella for an appeal that could delay the trial. The judge has not ruled on that request.

They argue Boccabella erred when he declined to dismiss the child-welfare charges, arguing the statute of limitations expired, the defendants did not provide direct care for children and they are charged with actions that occurred before the law was revised.

Earlier this month, the judge dismissed charges of failing to properly report suspected abuse, and last year the Superior Court threw out perjury, obstruction and conspiracy charges.

The three administrators fielded a complaint in 2001 from a graduate assistant who said he saw Sandusky, then retired as an assistant football coach, sexually abusing a boy in a team shower.

They did not report the matter to police or child welfare authorities, but did tell Sandusky he could no longer bring children to the campus and they notified his charity for children, The Second Mile.

Sandusky currently is serving a lengthy state prison term after being convicted in 2012 of 45 counts of sexual abuse of 10 boys.

Last week, a new judge appointed to preside over his appeals under the state's Post-Conviction Relief Act scheduled a March 24 hearing at the courthouse near State College to "present and finalize the evidentiary portion" of the hearing.