Joe Must Go: Bob Ford on Paterno's Role in the Sandusky Scandal

Joe Must Go: Bob Ford on Paterno's Role in the Sandusky Scandal

For years, Joe Paterno's persistent retirement controversy has been focused on football. It's been focused on what Penn State owes in return to its legendary coach. It's been focused on a man who has done so much good for such a proud university.

Now, it may be focused on what Paterno didn't do.

Bob Ford has a cutting piece in this morning's Inquirer, detailing what he believes to be the football coach's unforgivable negligence in failing to follow through on what he knew to be unreported and uncharged criminal activity. The article draws a sharp contrast between the Paterno we thought we knew, and the Paterno we really don't want to know.

From Ford:

"Paterno escaped indictment because he told athletic director Tim Curley about an alleged 2002 incident in which a graduate student reported discovering Sandusky performing acts on a boy who was about 10 years old in the shower area of the locker room. Paterno told Curley, who failed to report it to the proper authorities, according to the attorney general. Then Paterno apparently did nothing."

"That is where we start to see the difference between the fictional Joe Paterno, whose reputation and that of the university has been built on rock-solid morals, and what might be the real Joe Paterno."

Ford not only concludes that Paterno has lost his opportunity to walk away on his own terms, but goes on to ask, "If Penn State athletic coaches and administrators could look the other way when a 10-year-old is assaulted on campus by a prominent coach, what wouldn't they do?

While it seems easy to reach for the classic "Say it ain't so, Joe," it doesn't really apply.

Joe said it was so. Now it's just a matter of what he really knew. That's something we'd all like to hear.

10 observations from Day 1 of Eagles' OTAs

10 observations from Day 1 of Eagles' OTAs

There was finally some football in South Philly on Tuesday as the Eagles kicked off the first round of their OTAs. 

Aside from a few notable absences -- Fletcher Cox, Jason Peters, Donnie Jones -- the Eagles had just about everyone on the field (see story)

Here are 10 observations from Tuesday's practice: 

1. Here's how the first-team offense looked: 
QB: Carson Wentz
RB: LeGarrette Blount
TE: Zach Ertz
OL (left to right): Lane Johnson, Isaac Seumalo, Jason Kelce, Brandon Brooks, Halapoulivaati Vaitai
WR: Alshon Jeffery, Torrey Smith, Jordan Matthews

2. Here's how the first-team defense looked: 
LDE: Brandon Graham
LDT: Destiny Vaeao
RDT: Tim Jernigan
RDE: Vinny Curry
LBs: Jordan Hicks, Nigel Bradham, Mychal Kendricks
S: Malcolm Jenkins, Rodney McLeod
CB: Jalen Mills, Patrick Robinson. 

Note: In the nickel package, rookie third-rounder Rasul Douglas came on the field as an outside cornerback and Mills slid into the slot. 

3. Early in the practice, in an offense-only drill, the Eagles were trying to audible into a new play, but there was some confusion with Blount, who didn't seem to know the play. Blount is still obviously learning the playbook, but it shows the respect they have for him that he was working with the ones already. 

4. The play the Eagles wanted to get into during that drill was a good one. Wentz rolled out to his right and found Jeffery streaking across the field. The two seem to be getting on just fine. 

Although later in 11-on-11s, Wentz tossed up an ill-advised pass deep to Jeffery in tight coverage and the ball was picked by McLeod. Jeffery will win a lot of battles, but that one was too much. 

5. Linebacker Joe Walker and cornerback Ron Brooks were on the field on Tuesday but didn't participate in team drills. Walker (ACL) and Brooks (quad tendon) are both recovering from significant injuries. 

6. The Eagles lined up a few times with Darren Sproles and Donnel Pumphrey on the field together. Those few times, Sproles was in the backfield and Pumphrey lined up in the slot. It's early, but we might get to see some creativity from Doug Pederson with these two this year. 

7. Dillon Gordon, whom the Eagles signed as an undrafted rookie last year, did something interesting on Tuesday. The offensive tackle, who played tight end in college, took a few reps at tight end in limited offensive drills. That's intriguing because if he could play the role of an extra tackle during the season, he'd have something Matt Tobin doesn't: the ability to actually become a receiver, not just an eligible one. 

8. Robinson, who is getting run at corner with the first team, won a jump ball with Dorial Green-Beckham on a deep ball. It was an impressive play by Robinson, but DGB mistimed his jump. 

The best defensive play of the day came from Najee Goode in 7-on-7s. The veteran backup linebacker and special teamer dropped back and dove backward to break up a pass off the hand of Nick Foles. 

9. Obviously, there's no hitting yet, but Derek Barnett had a good first day going against the vets. Sure, Lane Johnson completely shut him down on one play, but Barnett showed off a variety of moves. 

10. The Eagles' two rookie receivers worked with the third team on Tuesday, while DGB and Nelson Agholor worked with the twos. Shelton Gibson showed off his quickness and Mack Hollins' size and speed combo wasn't any less impressive. Also, Hollins wasn't wearing gloves, but it didn't seem to affect his ability to catch. 

Stupid observation of the day: Thanks to his afro and thick beard, Seumalo kind of looks like a lion with a mane. 

The NFL shortened overtime to 10 minutes and people want to make sure Donovan McNabb knows

The NFL shortened overtime to 10 minutes and people want to make sure Donovan McNabb knows

First reported by ESPN’s Adam Schefter, the NFL owners have voted today to shorten overtime from 15 minutes to 10 minutes as a move to reduce playing time to aid in player safety.

People on Twitter wanted to make sure Donovan McNabb knows about the change.


Although nearly nine years have passed since the Eagles and Bengals played to a 13-13 tie, it seems the former Eagles' QB still hasn't lived down the fact that he didn't know that could happen in the NFL.

"I've never been a part of a tie," McNabb said after the game ended. "I never even knew that was in the rule book."

McNabb wasn't alone, as several other of his teammates, including DeSean Jackson and Correll Buckhalter also did not know the game could end in a tie.

Now, more games will likely end in a tie and fans probably won't ever let McNabb forget it.