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Lavoy Allen Sets Rebounding Benchmark in Meaningless Sixers Victory

Lavoy Allen Sets Rebounding Benchmark in Meaningless Sixers Victory

Even down three of their five starters—or at least, three of the five
guys you'd have thought might have started for this team when things
were looking a lot sunnier at season's beginning—you had to feel pretty
good about the Sixers' chances of beating the Charlotte Bobcats tonight.
The game wasn't pretty, and was often a lot closer than it should have
been, but ultimately, the Sixers were able to take care of business,
keeping the 'Cats at arm's length for most of the second half, with Jrue
Holiday basically closing the door on them in the fourth with a couple
key buckets. Evan Turner got off the schneid a little with his 16
points, Spencer Hawes ground out a respectable 17 and 9 game, and
recently signed backup PG Jeremy Pargo impressed is his Sixers debut,
scoring 12 with six dimes in 29 bench minutes.

But tonight was
all about Lavoy Allen. We haven't talked a whole lot about Lavoy on the
Level this season, because his play has been about as expected—solid,
but unremarkable, proving himself worthy of his two-year, six-mil
contract without making the deal look like a huge steal or anything.
Tonight was easily his best game of the season though, as he grabbed an
astounding 22 rebounds–11 offensive, 11 defensive—and added 14 points
and solid post defense as well. The 22 boards nearly doubles Lavoy's
previous career high of 12, and is the most for any Sixer since Samuel
Dalembert grabbed 23 against the Warriors in March of 2009. ("All I did was put my hands up and the ball came to me," Chris Vito reports Lavoy explaining. "I didn't do anything special.")

The
career night is indicative of Lavoy stepping up his efforts—aided by a
season-high 41 minutes of PT—without Thaddeus Young, by far the Sixers'
most productive frontcourt player. The activity is encouraging, and
along with another promising game from Arnett Moultrie—only three
points, but seven rebounds, and good general activity (along with two
fouls drawn, which basically makes him Allen Iverson as far as this
Sixers team is concerned)—Thad's absence hasn't been quite as
devastating thusfar as it could have been.

The next few will be a
lot tougher for the Sixers, as they host the playoff-bound Los Angeles
Clippers (who, despite being a much worse team in the midst of Chris
Paul's recent knee troubles, are still comfortably superior to our
Liberty Ballers), and then head north to visit the Milwaukee Bucks,
Philly's last game before the All-Star Break. Treading water is the name
of the game with Thad out, so winning one of those two would be pretty
huge—though we're keeping our expectations reasonable. For now, as long
as we keep playing games and nobody gets injured or traded, I feel like
we're at least breaking even.

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

About NBC internships

The Giants are a bad football team

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The Giants are a bad football team

It sounds like Giants coach Ben McAdoo is growing tired of Eli Manning doing Eli Manning things.

Manning’s season is off to a horrendous start, and by extension, the Giants are, too. New York’s record fell to 0-2 on Monday night, as the franchise’s two-time Super Bowl champion quarterback was responsible for blunder after blunder in a 24-10 loss to the Lions.

Manning only threw one interception, but it was so bad, anybody could plainly see it was destined to get picked off the moment the ball left his hand. With 10 minutes remaining and down by 14, Manning decided to look short of the sticks on 4th-and-3, which resulted in a turnover on downs.

But the play that seemed to grate on McAdoo the most after the defeat was a penalty for delay of game in the third quarter. Trailing 17-7 in the third quarter, the Giants lined up to go for it on 4th-and-goal from the 2-yard line. Somehow, Manning didn’t get the snap off in time, New York was penalized five yards, and the team wound up settling for the field goal anyway.

"Sloppy quarterback play," McAdoo said via Jordan Raanan for ESPN.com. "Quarterback and center need to be on the same page there. We need to get the ball snapped."

It’s not very often you hear an NFL coach be so bluntly and specifically critical of one of his players. Then again, most NFL coaches don’t know the joys of coaching Eli Manning, who does this kind of stuff all the time.

"Because we have a veteran quarterback who has played a lot of football and I expect us to get the ball snapped," McAdoo said, explaining why he didn’t call a timeout with the play clock winding.

Translation: That was entirely, 100 percent on Manning.

Granted, Manning isn’t to blame for all of the Giants’ problems. Not unlike the Eagles, the offense can’t/won’t run the football, averaging 3.4 yards on 18 attempts against the Lions. The pass protection isn’t any better, either, allowing Manning to take 5 sacks and 8 quarterback hits – also reminiscent of the Eagles.

Yet, unlike the Eagles, people were strangely afraid of the Giants coming into the 2017 season. A lot of people had this team pegged as a contender for an NFC East championship, and while it’s too early to rule it out, I’ve never quite been sure why.

Manning and the Giants’ offensive struggles date back to last season, as the team hasn’t eclipsed 20 points in its last eight regular and postseason games – since November. All the only real upgrade the front office made in the offseason was to sign 33-year-old wide receiver Brandon Marshall.

Sure, New York’s defense is excellent. This isn’t 2007 though. It’s not good enough to overcome this level of offensive ineptitude.

Barring a sudden and dramatic turnaround, the Giants are a bad football team. The offensive line stinks. They have no ground attack to speak of whatsoever. Odell Beckham is the offense’s only viable threat, and he probably isn’t 100 percent. And Eli Manning is as mistake-prone as ever, except he’s 36 years old now and almost certainly is not putting the same mustard on the ball like he used to.

The Eagles host the Giants on a short week this Sunday. Make of that what you will.