Learning About MS and Getting Dirty to Help: Our Chat with Peter Hopkins

Learning About MS and Getting Dirty to Help: Our Chat with Peter Hopkins

As part of our partnership with the National MS Society in an attempt to help bring awareness to and encourage people to get involved with the MuckRuckus MS Philly, we'll be talking with a number of people whose lives are affected by MS on a daily basis and who have also been involved with the MuckRuckus MS Philly in years past. We're hoping you can JOIN US in participating in this year's run on June 9th in Newtown Square. You can sign up to join The700Level.com team to run alongside us here, and if you'd rather just donate to help a good cause that is also appreciated.

Admittedly, we were initially a bit intimidated by the idea of running 5 miles through mud and obstacles but after chatting with today's interview subject, Peter Hopkins, he helped us turn that intimidation into excitement.

Peter is a 53-year-old Church Choir Director and musician at St. Peter's Church at 3rd and Pine Streets in Philadelphia -- "not exactly a profession you'd equate with mud running," he says. Neither is "professional sports blogger" for that matter.

Peter's wife, Paula, was diagnosed with primary-progressive MS in 2005 and he viewed the MuckRuckus as a fun way to try and show support for her and the many others fighting the often invisible disease. We spoke with him on Tuesday about both MS and his experiences running through the mud.

Enrico: From my experiences, a lot of people don't seem to fully understand what Multiple Sclerosis is exactly. Having dealt with it on a daily basis, how do you explain what it is to those unfamiliar?

Peter Hopkins: The big problem with MS is that it's usually invisible. The person having the problem, unless they're incredibly severe and they're out in public, you'd never see them like that. If they're really sick and feeling the symptoms then they withdraw from public. MS limits your ability to move in many, many different ways. It's different in different people. Some people lose the ability to walk or to walk very well. Some people lose the ability to stay standing up for very long which limits their ability to do things. Most people with MS are very intolerant of heat. For you, you might think a nice 80 degree day might be beautiful outside, but for someone with MS, they can't go outside, they've got to stay in the air conditioning.

It's almost all invisible. There are no sores on their body or you don't look different. That's one of the hard things for people to understand, that they don't see the see the symptoms like many other diseases. For most people with MS the symptoms come and go. My wife has the kind where the symptoms are always there. For some people you may go several months without symptoms. Normally when a person is feeling all of the symptoms of weakness and things, that's when they stay home and kind of withdraw from company for a while until they feel better again. So the next time you see them they look normal again and sometimes they actually feel normal too. That's one of the hardest things about MS is that the symptoms come and go for most people and that they're almost all invisible.

Enrico: How did you get involved with the MuckRuckus?

Peter: I had been kind of interested in the concept before I even saw the MS one. My own story was that I never exercised in my life. I was a severely obese person for most of my life. I used to weigh about 300 pounds. Finally at about age 48 I decided to get really serious about things and I got a trainer and lost most of that weight. I saw something on the Internet about the mud run and it looked interesting and it kind of snowballed from there. We got other people doing it, started fundraising, started having fundraising boot camps.

Enrico: I'm going to attempt to do the MuckRuckus this year but I'm a little intimidated and a little (a lot) out of shape. Do you have any advice for people like me?

Peter: It's easy to be intimidated, but one of the nice things about this MuckRuckus is that it is true that almost anyone can do it. It's about 5 miles but you don't run that whole time non stop. You can't. You have to stop and do the various obstacles and things that are in it. There's some built in rest. And next, virtually all of the obstacles and especially the more difficult ones, you can just decide not to do that one. There are a couple of obstacles that involve ropes and heights and you can just decide you don't want to do those. You can just walk around them. Three-quarter of the people are in the non-competitive division and you do what you want. I force myself to do all of them including the couple that really freaked me out the first time. You'll find you can do a lot more of them.

Enrico: You've done the MuckRuckus a couple times now, is there a certain obstacle or a moment that sticks out the most?

Peter: You get to let out your inner 8-year-old boy. I'm not sure that works as well for the girls, but a lot of them enjoy it to. You just get to be filthy. It's pretty hilarious. How often do you get to be absolutely covered in mud and dirt in front of thousands of other people doing the same thing. There's something kind of freeing about that part of it.

Enrico: What kind of people typically run in this event?

Peter: There are all ages out there. It's not just people in their twenties who are super fit personal trainers. There's every kind of person out there. There are people that are far older than me.

Enrico: Is your wife appreciative of the effort you and all the other runners put in?

Peter: Oh yeah. We have a good time with it. So many people know her and know about her struggle and how she keeps working. She's a musician as well and admire her for it. So I've gotten a lot of donations, not because of me but because of her. She's the one that works harder than I do everyday just to be mobile and to do things. With MS it's very tempting just to go to bed and for many people just to give up, but most of them never do. If they can do that, then I can get dirty for one day.

*

Peter also suggested those interested in training in center city to get in touch with Mike McLaughlin at Radius Fitness at their website here. We may put ourselves through some of his training and report back in the coming weeks.

There are also a bunch of other training options rounded up at the MS Society site here both in the suburbs and in the city. You can see them all here.

Previously: Join The700Level at MuckRuckus MS Philly in June to Help Fight Multiple Sclerosis

Shocker: Phillies interested in getting one of baseball's best players

Shocker: Phillies interested in getting one of baseball's best players

We're all looking forward to the free-agent class of 2018.

If Maikel Franco doesn't shape up, the Phillies could make a hard push for Manny Machado. Franco after a two-game benching is back in the lineup for this afternoon's game against the Rockies (see story).

Then, of course, there's Bryce Harper, who earlier this month agreed to a one-year, $21,625,000 deal for next season. 

And guess what? If Harper becomes a free agent after next season, the Phillies would be interested in signing him.

Really?

According to a FanRagSportsNetwork, citing a Phillies source, the Phils would be interested luring Harper to Philly.

Shocker. 

It'd be big news if a Phillies source said the team wasn't interested in signing Harper. 

Anyway, the story also quotes a National League scout.

“Could you imagine what he could do in that ballpark playing 81 games a year in that bandbox?” the scout said.

Chances are every Phillies fan has already imagined it. Harper this season alone is hitting .351/.400/.784 with five homers and 12 RBIs in nine games against the Phils. In three games at the Bank, he's hitting just .250 with a homer and two RBIs.

But in 38 career games at CBP, he's hitting .296/.361/.627 with 12 home runs and 26 RBIs.

In 89 career games against the Phillies, he's hitting .282 with 20 homers and 54 RBIs.

At the risk of stating the obvious, here's one thing to remember: If the Phils sign Harper, then he'd no longer benefit from facing them.

Today's Lineup: Franco batting cleanup as Phillies try to snap skid

Today's Lineup: Franco batting cleanup as Phillies try to snap skid

Well, this hasn't gone well. 

Coming into Thursday afternoon's game against the Rockies, the Phillies have lost five straight. They've lost nine of their last 10. They've lost 20 of their last 24. 

At 15-29, they're not just the worst team in the NL East. They're not just the worst team in the National League. 

Through 44 games, the Phillies are the worst team in baseball. 

Just to make it to a .500 record this season, they would need to go 66-52 (.559) the rest of the way. 

Their four-game series against the Rockies will mercifully come to a close on Thursday afternoon at Citizens Bank Park. In the first three games of the series -- all losses -- the Phils have been outscored 23-5. 

Maikel Franco returns to the four-hole as the Phillies try to snap out of their funk.

The Phillies on Thursday also activated right-handed pitcher Jeanmar Gomez from the disabled list. Gomez takes Adam Morgan's spot on the roster. Morgan was reassigned to Triple A Lehigh Valley after throwing three scoreless innings during the Phillies' 7-2 loss to the Rockies.

Gomez hasn't pitched since May 4 because of an elbow injury. He began the season as the Phillies' closer but was demoted after blowing two saves and allowing seven runs in his first five innings. In 11 1/3 innings this season, Gomez has a 7.94 ERA.

Here's the full lineup: 

1. Cesar Hernandez, 2B
2. Aaron Altherr, LF
3. Odubel Herrera, CF
4. Maikel Franco, 3B
5. Tommy Joseph, 1B
6. Michael Saunders, RF
7. Cameron Rupp, C
8. Freddy Galvis, SS
9. Vince Velasquez, P