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Lurie Takes a Mulligan on His Eagles

Lurie Takes a Mulligan on His Eagles

What if every NFL team were given one mulligan per game?

What if Andy Reid could re-think the decision to go for it on 4th and 1 against the Giants? What if Alex Henery could re-try either of his two missed field goals against the 49ers?

What if the Bills had to line up and actually punt or run a play after Juqua Parker jumped offside? What if Andy threw the mulligan flag after Asante Samuel left Jaiquawn Jarrett on an island with Larry Fitzgerald?

What if the Eagles had do-overs on last-gasp drives where Jeremy Maclin dropped a fourth down pass in Atlanta, and fumbled the ball away against the Niners? What if they had another chance after Jason Avant failed to haul in the pass that moseyed into a defender's hands in Buffalo? What if immediately after DeSean Jackson put the ball on the carpet at his own nine-yard line, they could have simply made the Bears punt the ball again?

How many more games would the Eagles have won had they used a mulligan on any of their nine turnovers in the red zone this season?

What if the Eagles were given even just one mulligan this season?

Clearly, they would be in the playoffs.

If Jeffrey Lurie doesn't want to admit he's making excuses for Andy Reid and his club's 8-8 record, at least not publicly during Tuesday's news conference, then I suppose I'll have to be the one to play devil's advocate; and the fact is, if Lurie is unable to explain why he believes the Birds will rebound under Reid next season, that's probably because he can't figure out how they fell on the wrong side of the postseason in the first place.

Just look at all the things that had to go wrong to lose those games. It was quality players constantly coming up small, often multiple times during the same sixty minutes. When you factor in some of the hard luck the Eagles fell on -- making massive roster and schematic overhauls during a condensed offseason, the occasional bout of questionable officiating, and of course, a few untimely injuries -- with all due respect, Mr. Lurie, you could come up with all the excuses in the world.

As Lurie so deftly touched on, the Eagles missed the playoffs for only the third time in the last 12 years. Previously, they were decimated by injuries and a fractured locker room in 2005, then in '07, Donovan McNabb was still working his way back from an ACL the previous year. Both seasons, there was logical rationale -- or excuses -- for the disappointing outcomes, and the team was back in the tournament the following year.

This season, you can take your pick of what the excuse is, and if Lurie is right, you can count on the Birds making it back to the postseason.

It's fully understood how difficult it will be for a large portion of the fan base to stomach another year of Andy ball, and chances are an overwhelming percentage of those folks were already off the head coach's bandwagon before this season transpired. After 13 years, any head coach is bound to become a polarizing figure, and most of the people hunkered in with the anti-Reid crowd simply feel his time came and went.

Even those of us who have the tendency to support Andy are conflicted about seasons like 2011, when the expectations were much more in line with Super Bowl appearance than .500 finish.

But then there's what could've been. One turnover, one penalty, one catch, one kick, one tackle, one challenge, one stand, one bounce, one yard; any of them could have meant one more win and one playoff berth. Spread across multiple games, one play in each loss could have been the difference between two, three, maybe even four more wins.

The Eagles have Pro Bowl caliber talent at nearly every position on the field. They have the best head coach for the quarterback who will be under center in 2012. They are on a four-game winning streak, and as fashionable as it is to point out the quality of their opponents -- or lack there of -- good teams beat bad teams in the NFL, so the important part to remember is they handled their business in the end.

Jeffrey Lurie realized that, so he made the most unpopular decision an owner can make.

He took a mulligan on 2011.

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

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Sixers have Joel Embiid on 'hyper-conservative progression' plan

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Sixers have Joel Embiid on 'hyper-conservative progression' plan

The foremost question on everybody’s minds when Sixers president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo and coach Brett Brown met with reporters over lunch Wednesday afternoon was simple: When is Joel Embiid going to be able to play 5-on-5?

“Right now,” Brown said, “we can’t give you a direct answer.”

The 23-year-old Embiid, who as a rookie in 2016-17 displayed uncommon skills and equally uncommon charisma, underwent surgery to repair a torn meniscus in his left knee in March, ending his season after 31 games.

The 7-2, 280-pound center is the obvious key to a young, promising team, but he is not yet ready to go full-tilt. 

“If you walk in the gym, it looks like he could play 5-on-5 basketball,” Colangelo said. “But we’re going to take our cues from the people who know best.”

And right now the Sixers’ medical staff, headed by the newly hired vice president of athlete care, Dr. Daniel Medina, favors what Colangelo called “a hyper-conservative progression.”

“Will he be ramping that up throughout the preseason?” Colangelo said “Yes. How many games, we’re not certain. Is it every game? We don’t know. That will be based on what we’re told.”

The Sixers open training camp next Tuesday in their Camden, New Jersey-based facility. The preseason begins Oct. 4 against Memphis at the Wells Fargo Center, while the regular season opens Oct. 18 in Washington.

“It’s not about being ready for the first practice or the first game,” Colangelo said. “And he will be out there for the first practice and the first game. The question is how much, how little, if at all. Those things will be determined by certain criteria along the way.”

Colangelo said, in fact, that he has a document that spells out the criteria that must be met before Embiid can play.

“There is a plan in place,” Colangelo said, “and it’s a progression-based plan. It’s criteria-based, and as he’s checking off boxes, and continues to jump over each and every successive item, then we’ll put him out there on the floor. There’s no timetable. There’s no scheduled number of minutes. There is no decision on back-to-backs. All of that is yet to be determined.”

Embiid, the third overall pick in the 2014 draft, missed his first two seasons while recovering from a broken foot. He averaged 20.2 points, 7.8 rebounds and 2.5 blocks last season, despite a minutes restriction; he averaged just 25.4 a game.

When Brown was asked whether Embiid will be on such a restriction this season, he said, “We all hope not, obviously.”

The other question about Embiid concerns whether he and the team can reach an accord on a contract extension. Colangelo said he is “cautiously optimistic” that that can happen before Oct. 16, the NBA’s deadline for extending players on their rookie deals.

But the primary question remains about Embiid’s health.

“This really is about creating an opportunity for him to have long-term, sustainable health,” Colangelo said, “not to get ready for the first preseason game per se, or the second preseason game. Again, that progression is going to lead to hopefully a full season of competitive basketball, without restriction. That’s the goal.”