Movie Review: 5 things that bugged me about Draft Day

Movie Review: 5 things that bugged me about Draft Day

Most of the reactions I had read beforehand about Draft Day—the new feature film about the NFL draft, a rather mundane event where names are read off of index cards for three straight days—amounted to, “I can’t believe they made this into a movie.” Well, they did, and it’s not bad.

Kevin Costner is the general manager of the Cleveland Browns, and he makes a Washington/Robert Griffin-esque trade up to No. 1 overall the morning of the draft. Drama ensues. It’s not the most realistic series of events leading to the finish, but your mind will be occupied by the football stuff as the stories of love, family and redemption at the movie’s core play out.

On first viewing, the film earns the grade of watchable, which is high praise in my own very stringent movie review system.

Of course, any sports movie is bound to stray from reality or have little moments that stand out as odd. For example, Chris Berman explaining what would happen if the Browns didn’t make their pick with the 10 minutes allotted the moment the team was on the clock seemed strange. Yeah, like the GM who just traded three first-round picks to go No. 1 wouldn’t get the pick in on time… /eye roll

Okay, so clearly that didn’t sit well with me. Here’s four more, minus spoilers of course.

 

2. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell greeted at draft by cheers.

Oh, come on. Everybody knows the draft’s greatest tradition after disappointed New York Jets fans is the raucous boos that occur the moment the commish steps into plain view of the crowd. Goodell probably isn’t as loathed as former MLB commissioner Bud Selig once was or current NHL commissioner Gary Bettman is now, but why even pretend the public adores the man?

Goodell, and in turn this movie, should just embrace the fact the common fan is never going to appreciate the people responsible for meddling with the game they love.

 

3. Joe Banner makes unnecessary cameo

I know I’m in the minority, but I always really admired what Joe Banner accomplished with the Philadelphia Eagles. Then he did what he did with/to the Browns, and I wonder if I wasn’t giving him too much credit all these years.

Anyway, his appearance in this motion picture was as completely pointless as that little introductory paragraph. It happens in pretty much the very last scene, the fictitious owner of the Browns shaking the real-life executive’s hand, and that was it. Banner’s mean mug on the big screen for no reason at all. It’s was supposed to be a drama, not a horror movie.

 

4. Chris Berman

This guy isn’t any better playing broadcaster in fictitious story than he is in real life. Reminded me why I don’t watch ESPN’s NFL anything coverage.

 

5. Dennis Leary says the Dallas Cowboys win. “A lot”

This immediately and instinctively prompted the following snide remark from my chair: “Yeah, 20 years ago.” Seriously, Leary’s head coach character should’ve come from the New England Patriots if the writers wanted to make that remark.

 

Honorable mentions (possible spoilers)

 

• Hollywood: where the Jacksonville Jaguars are still more dysfunctional than the Browns.

• So the consensus top overall prospect is just gonna storm out of the green room when he doesn’t go No. 1, and none of the networks are going to mention that?

• Seriously, you would have to be like the worst GM in the history of GMs to trade up for the No. 1 pick and a) not take the player you traded for in the first place, then b) take a guy instead who was in danger of falling to the second round.

Andrew Knapp's long homer a bright spot for skidding Phillies as rookie pushes Cameron Rupp

Andrew Knapp's long homer a bright spot for skidding Phillies as rookie pushes Cameron Rupp

Hidden in the Phillies' sub-par Sunday was one bright spot: Andrew Knapp.

The young backup catcher blasted a long home run into the Phillies' bullpen that gave them an early lead they would soon relinquish in an 8-4 loss to the Reds. The long ball comes on the heels of Knapp's first back-to-back starts earlier in the week.

"The more playing time you get, the better you feel," he said. "That's just the way it goes. I'm just trying to take my opportunities and take advantage of them. Unfortunately, we didn't win today, but the more at-bats I get, the better I feel."

The 25-year-old rookie was handed a prime opportunity in the second inning with two men on and one out. Starter Scott Feldman put him behind 0-2 with consecutive fastballs and tried to put him away upstairs. Knapp stayed poised and laid off both pitches, waiting for a mistake.

And the mistake came with a belt-high curveball that Knapp barreled 434 feet for a three-run homer.

"I wasn't really looking for it," he said. "I knew he liked to throw it with two strikes. It was kind of in the back of my head. But I was just looking for something out over the dish. He was pounding me in, but I was going to make him beat me away. I thankfully got that one out in front a bit."

Knapp is now 53 at-bats into his MLB career and has an impressive .264/.371/.509 batting line with three home runs and seven RBIs. He's played well enough to push starting catcher Cameron Rupp for more playing time and earn himself some extra starts beyond day games after night games.

"I feel good," Knapp said. "I'm learning a lot. Each at-bat in itself is its own thing and you can't really have much rollover. At the same time, the more I get in there, the better I feel and the more experience I get. So I feel good so far."

Rupp has been solid at the plate, although he dealt with some issues defensively last week. As Knapp got consecutive starts, Rupp sat out both Tuesday and Wednesday against the Rockies. He rebounded with a three-walk game Thursday afternoon.

With Knapp swinging the bat well, manager Pete Mackanin hopes it will only push Rupp to level his game up.

"Competition is great for pitchers and for position players and I think it's good," Mackanin said. "Knapp hit that home run today. He's been swinging the bat pretty well, catching pretty well and that's only, in my opinion, going to make Rupp better."

On Friday, Mackanin said he would give Knapp more playing time, looking to possibly split starts between Rupp and Knapp at four and three starts, respectively, per week. That's how it worked out during this past homestand.

The manager was unsure what the upward limit on Knapp's starts could be, but he was pleased about his catching situation despite the team's overall issues.

"Cam hasn't been swinging the bat that well lately, but they're both going to get playing time," Mackanin said. "Cam will get the brunt of the playing time. For me, it's a great situation. Now we have two guys that we think a lot of."

Nico Hischier recounts meteoric rise in draft stock as Flyers do their homework

Nico Hischier recounts meteoric rise in draft stock as Flyers do their homework

WINDSOR, Ontario -- Ever since the Flyers shot up the selection order at last month’s NHL draft lottery, prospect and Halifax Mooseheads center Nico Hischier has been familiarizing himself with the Flyers' organization.

The Flyers entered the lottery with just a 2.2 percent shot at the first overall pick after finishing the season with a 39-33-10 record but climbed 11 spots from the 13th selection to No. 2 in the draft, which takes place June 23-24 in Chicago.

“I know it’s a sports city — they have the NHL, NBA and all those sports,” Hischier said Saturday at the Memorial Cup. “It’s a really nice city and I know Mark Streit played there and Jakub Voracek played in Halifax as well.”

The Flyers' brass has wasted no time familiarizing themselves with the 18-year-old, who spent this season playing with the Mooseheads in the QMJHL.

“We had already a little meeting together, but I think at combine we’ll see each other again,” said Hischier, who is ranked second amongst North American skaters by NHL Central Scouting. “It was just that they want to know me better as a person. They asked me some personal questions and that’s about it.”

A native of Naters, Switzerland, Hischier grew up playing soccer. He was also an avid skier and snowboarder before his older brother, Luca, turned him on to hockey.

“I used to ski a lot,” Hischier said. “First skiing, and then snowboarding, but my brother played hockey, he’s four years older than me, then I just wanted to play hockey as well.”

Last season, Hischier followed his brother to Bern, where he played 15 games in the Swiss pro league with several former NHLers while he was coached by current Senators bench boss Guy Boucher.

The six-foot, 174-pound center registered one assist in his brief stint with the club but gained valuable experience in the process.

“I think that helped me a lot because they’re all older guys and they gave me some good tips, too,” he said. “I really could learn from them and it’s great that I could play with them.

“I think I learned a lot (from Boucher). He brought Canadian hockey to Switzerland, I think. His practices were hard and I could really learn from him.”

Halifax used the sixth selection at last year’s CHL import draft to pick Hischier, and after a little convincing, the lanky forward made the decision to make the move to North America.

“I just came to Canada to try to become a better hockey player and I worked hard,” he said. “I had great teammates, and Halifax is a great organization.”

Adjusting to the smaller rinks in North America admittedly took time for Hischier, but he adapted well leading all CHL rookies in scoring with 38 goals and 48 assists in 57 games. On Saturday, he was named the CHL’s rookie of the year (see story).

“I think I improved my game in the corners,” Hischier said. “You have to dump more pucks over here on North American ice, and chase the puck more behind the net. At the end, I would say my play in the corners (improved the most).”

Growing up, Hischier watched former Red Wings star Pavel Datsyuk closely, trying to model his game after the Russian forward.

He spent time this season playing both the wing and center positions and isn’t afraid to go to the net hard despite his slender frame. His offensive talents coupled with his ability to play both ends of the ice is what caused his draft stock jump from 26th on ISS Hockey’s rankings in November to a top-three position in January.

Internationally, Hischier made a splash at this year’s Under-20 world junior tournament in Toronto and Montreal, scoring a team-leading four goals and seven points in five games.

The highlight came in the quarterfinals where Hischier nearly single-handedly upset the Americans, scoring two goals in a 3-2 loss.

The performance led to a glowing review from U.S. coach Bob Motzko.

“He was the best player we’ve seen in this tournament,” Motzko said following the game. “We tried all four lines against him and I thought he was playing every shift because every time he got out there, the ice was tilted. It was the first thing we said when we got into the locker room: ‘That’s the best player we’ve seen in the tournament.’”

After the Mooseheads' first-round playoff exit, Hischier once again donned his country’s colors, registering one assist in five games at the U-18 tournament.

However, he skipped out on an opportunity to represent Switzerland at the senior men’s tournament in favor of relaxation.

“It was really important (to recover),” he said. “I went a couple days away from Switzerland to the beach (in Italy) and just relaxed. It was really great. Had to refill my tank and it was just great.”

Hischier will get another opportunity to meet with the Flyers’ front office this week in Buffalo at the NHL’s scouting combine. It’s believed Hischier could make the jump to the NHL in the fall, but he knows he still has some work to do this summer to make his dream come true.

“Get some pounds on, I want to get stronger,” said Hischier. “I think that’s the most important thing and I work hard towards that.”