Nationals Infield Sucks, Phillies Win 11-3

Nationals Infield Sucks, Phillies Win 11-3

At long last, the Phillies' interminable one-game losing streak is over.
Yes, it was a tough 24 hours, but tonight the Fightins finally returned
to their winning ways with an 11-3 victory, moving the Fightins to an
exemplary 10-2 record for the month of August. Roy Oswalt, who gave up
just three runs over seven innings, picked up the W for the first time
since returning from the DL.

The win was due in no small part to the performance of the Washington
Nationals' infield, an atrocity exhibition the likes of which Ian Curtis
never even dreamed of. Booted grounders, poorly gloved grounders,
grounders missed altogether, sailed throws to first, dropped throws to
first...the Nats' infield may have only been charged with three errors
this evening, but there were least another three plays that the infield
just failed to make, nearly all of which the Phils ended up capitalizing
on. In fact, the only decent play made the entire inning by the
Natinals from within the diamond was made by starting pitcher John
Lannan, who glove-shoveled a slow-chopped Wilson Valdez grounder to home
to get a force on Ryan Howard. Besides that, Lannan got no help
whatsoever, resulting in this odd final pitching line: 3 IP, 7 R, 1 ER, 4
H, 5 BB, 1K

The Phillies didn't need to do all that much to take advantage of the
Nats' miscues—incredibly, they scored their first eight runs on just
five hits, only one of which was for extra bases—but they did help their
own cause with some smart baserunning. Wheels went orgasmic over the
number of times the boys went first-to-third on singles, as well as over
the Utley-like move from Wilson Valdez when he scored from second on an
infield grounder after the Nats failed to secure a force at second with
the bases loaded. And that one extra-base hit was a two-run blast from
Ryan Howard in the opening frame, which was big for the guys after they
only managed to scratch out one run in seven innings of Livan Hernandez
action last night. (By the way, with his four men driven in tonight,
Ryan now has 18 RBIs in his last 15 games, with six homers over that
span. Just mentioning.)

As for Little Roy's performance on the mound, he was fairly sharp in his
second start since returning from the DL. After laboring a little in
the first two innings, the Phils' five-run third gave Roy the chance to
settle down a little, and aside from a mildly sticky sixth, he breezed
the rest of the way, getting in seven innings with less than 100
pitches, striking out five and walking just one. Not dominant, but on a
night where all we really needed was solid efficiency, he certainly gave
us that, and the boy wonder Michael Stutes (who it appears has
officially replaced Raul Ibanez as the city's "UUUUUU" Fightin of
choice) finished the job with a scoreless final two innings.

Tomorrow, Roy Halladay takes the hill with a chance to give the Phils
their fifth series win in a row, opposed by Nationals sinkerballer /
reclamation project Chien-Ming Wang. With the Braves' 8-4 loss to the
Cubs last night, Philly is back to being 8.5 games up in the East, and
if the Phils win again tomorrow, they'll only have to play .500 ball the
rest of the season to end up with 100 wins. Hell of a season, Jackie.

Of course Doug Pederson has actually run up the Rocky steps

Of course Doug Pederson has actually run up the Rocky steps

Doug Pederson sat down with Matt Mosley and Ed Werder on their Doomsday podcast recently to talk some NFC East football.

They caught Doug during his son's little league baseball game and chatted about topics ranging from Carson Wentz's rookie year, the Dallas Cowboys, Sidney Jones, and the addition of a plethora of weapons on offense.

Doug sees a Dak Prescott and Carson Wentz-dominated NFC East for years to come. Coach Pederson was impressed by the way Prescott carried himself on and off the field. Doug pointed out that Dak didn't have to do anything remarkable for the Cowboys to win games which allowed him to simply be himself.

Perhaps that's something Wentz will benefit from in year two with so many more weapons around him.

Things got a little fluffy as the interview went on and they asked Doug if he's actually run up the Rocky steps before.

The "Rocky steps" of course being the steps in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. And of course he has.

"I have. I actually have," Doug said. "In fact, several years ago when I was an assistant coach, family and friends would come visit for home games so I had to be the tour guide. I would escort them down to the steps and we would make that ascent to the top of the steps. I've done it a few times now.

"When you get to the top of the steps and you turn around and you're looking right down the Parkway, right into Center City, with the cityscape of Philadelphia, you can't help but raise your arms."

Doug adds that he's a provolone with onions on his cheesesteak and that he still refers to the Eagles' owner as Mr. Lurie.

"I'm going to keep calling him Mr. Lurie until hopefully one day I can stand on that podium and hoist the Lombardi trophy. I'll probably use his first name at that point."

You can listen to the full conversation with Doug right here.

 

Eagles OTA storylines: Jeffery in uniform, rotations, awkwardness

Eagles OTA storylines: Jeffery in uniform, rotations, awkwardness

The Eagles will finally be playing football this week. Sort of. 

Tuesday morning marks the beginning of Organized Team Activities (OTAs), the first time most of the 2017 Eagles will be on the field together. 

While OTAs are technically voluntary, the Eagles — and every other team — will have near-perfect attendance. For the Birds, that will include Brandon Graham, who was reportedly set to holdout, but rejoined the team just a few days after leaving (see story)

The Eagles will have a few rounds of OTAs (May 23-25, May 30-June 1, June 5-6, 8-9) leading up to the mandatory minicamp in mid-June. The mandatory minicamp runs from June 12-15. After that, the team is off until training camp. 

Thanks to the CBA, there are strict rules for what teams are allowed to do during OTAs. Players wear helmets but aren't allowed to wear pads, which means no contact. Also no 1-on-1 drills, but 11 on 11s are allowed. So there's at least some competition. 

Annual yearly warning: Be wary the stories of greatness from players in shorts in May. 

Last year, there were a ton of juicy storylines with a new coaching staff, a No. 2 pick quarterback and the Sam Bradford drama. By comparison, this year is boring, but the Eagles never lack drama. 

Here's what to watch this year: 

A new No. 17 
The Eagles' biggest free agent acquisition will be on the team for his first full-team practice. Alshon Jeffery is the type of receiver the Eagles desperately needed. He'll immediately become Carson Wentz's No. 1 weapon this season. 

So Tuesday will offer a first look at Jeffery and the other new pickups, including Torrey Smith, Timmy Jernigan and LeGarrette Blount. 

During rookie minicamp a couple weeks ago, third-rounder Rasul Douglas said he was looking forward to lining up across from Jeffery this week. He'll finally get his chance. 

Carson in Year 2
This time last year, Wentz was the Eagles' third-string quarterback, preparing for a redshirt rookie season. 

Now, he's the not just the starter but the young leader of the team and the face of the franchise. While he was already seemingly in command of the huddle as a rookie, expect him to continue to grow into his leadership role. Sometimes these things just take time. But he is already one of the unquestioned leaders of the team. 

Also, we'll see if there's any notable difference in his mechanics after working out with QB guru Adam Dedeaux this offseason. The main thing they worked on was footwork. We'll see if it helps limit the amount of throws Wentz sails — perhaps his biggest issue as a rookie. 

The rotations
We won't be able to learn a heckuva a lot from watching practices because football isn't meant to be played in shirts and no pads, but we will at least get to see who lines up with who. 

Because 11 on 11s are allowed, we'll get a glimpse of what the first, second and third teams look like. Will Allen Barbre start off as the first-team left guard? Who is the starting defensive end opposite Brandon Graham and on which side? Is LeGarrette Blount ready to run with the ones? 

Kelce and Kendricks
Jason Kelce and Mychal Kendricks are still on the roster after plenty of speculation this offseason that they'll be gone. And there's still a chance one or both could be traded. 

To their credit, both have been very professional throughout this process and both have been at the facility this spring. It's a part of the business, but it has to be a little weird to show up to work every day knowing you might be dealt. 

Hopefully, they'll make themselves available to answer a few questions. 

MIA
While Sidney Jones is still recovering from his Achilles tear, even if he wasn't, he wouldn't be allowed at the facility this week. Jones and his college teammate Elijah Qualls went to the University of Washington, which operates on a quarters system. 

It's a stupid rule, but the NFL doesn't allow players who went to schools on quarters systems to be in voluntary camps until they graduate. That might not seem like a huge deal, but for a guy like Qualls, who has a chance to fight for a roster spot, the time missed could be devastating. 

Last offseason, two undrafted tackles had a chance to make the team — Destiny Vaeao and Aziz Shittu — but only one did. During this time last year, Vaeao was on the field showing his potential, while Shittu was back in Stanford. Vaeao made the team and was a contributor, while Shittu was stuck on the practice squad.