15 Things Boston College Fans Should Expect from Steve Addazio

15 Things Boston College Fans Should Expect from Steve Addazio

In honor of our Fearless Leader's alma mater, it's been requested that I put together a list of what BC students, alums and fans should expect from their new head coach.

In 15 easy bullet points, a quick getting-to-know Steve Addazio:

• He will be loud. His press conferences will frequently be loud.

• He will be very excited. He will probably get you excited. It will be hard not to get excited.

• He'll talk about being a northeast guy at northeast school and about wanting to settle in the northeast region.

• To that end, you will keep a keep a very close watch on the coaching situation at UConn.

• He will run the ball. A lot.

• His offensive coordinator will run the ball. A lot. Ryan Day is already in Boston, according to the Inqy's Keith Pompey.

• He will have four keys to winning every football game:

1) Establish the run
2) Play great defense
3) Play outstanding on special teams
4) Don't turn the ball over.

You will be able to recite those keys verbatim in relatively short order.

• He will probably recruit a dual-threat quarterback to oversee a power run game crossed with a spread-option attack.

• You will hear all you've ever wanted to hear about tough, hard-nosed, smash-mouth, physical football.

• Losses will be couched with the idea that the other team is in substantially more pain than they were before the game, specifically because of your football team, and not the general undertaking of the game itself.

• He will appear as if he has no idea what's going on with conference realignment, but he will assure you that the administration has it covered.

• This will extend to any big-picture question asked on a Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday — the three days he will have media availability. Once you get into those Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, you'll just be so focused on what you're doing in practice, you won't have time to worry about all that other sh… stuff.

• He will come very close to swearing while at the podium after games. After wins, especially if they wind up few and far between, he will crack.

• He will be surprisingly honest, at times. He will tell you exactly what he's thinking, at times. At other times, he will lie through his teeth. He's a college football coach.

• There will never, ever be injury updates, though it's possible there will be a depth chart. I stress the word possible.

And now, I pass Steve Addazio onto you, Enrico. Good luck, BC.

Embiid and Okafor want to play together, but not just yet, says Brown

Embiid and Okafor want to play together, but not just yet, says Brown

CAMDEN, N.J. — If all goes as planned, a time will come when the Sixers can roll out a dominating frontcourt duo with Joel Embiid and Jahlil Okafor sharing the court in lengthy stretches.

That moment has to wait, though, as both Embiid and Okafor are on minute restrictions. As he returns from a knee injury, Okafor currently is coming off the bench and backing up Embiid.

“This conversation with Jahlil and Joel is more intelligent and applicable at a later date,” Brett Brown said at practice Friday. “When Jahlil’s minutes start going up and Joel can, then it’s a real conversation. I do think you may see them sooner than even I thought together. But as far as making it a real constant part of a strategy or rotation, it’s beyond too early days.”

In an ideal world, Brown could pair the two bigs now and use all of their allotted minutes (Embiid 20, Okafor 14) at once. That would leave an extensive workload on second-year bench player Richaun Holmes.

“This is a hot topic,” Brown said. “I will say it one more time: If I play Jahlil and Jo together, I hope Richaun can play 35 minutes.”

It’s an unrealistic expectation for Holmes, who averaged 13.8 minutes in 51 games last season. Brown caps the majority of the Sixers at six-minute segments to keep them competing at a high energy level.

“Right now, he’s a backup,” Brown said of Holmes. “I think he’s going to be an NBA player for a very long time. I just feel like in the role, he’s a second-year player that didn’t really have much of a role last year. He’s shown everybody that he’s for real. He really can play a role. At this early stage, that is the key word.”

Embiid and Okafor have been envisioning competing together since Okafor was drafted two years ago. They became friends long before they were NBA players and have an easy chemistry on the court as a result.

“I think it’s going to be exciting,” Embiid said. “We played a little bit together today in practice. We’re figuring out how to play with each other. It’s a process and we’ve got trust it.”

Yes, the players know they have to wait, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy for them to resist an opportunity to play with one another.  

“I think once we figure it out, we can really dominate together,” Okafor said. “We were able to flirt with it again today. We accidentally keep ending up on the same team even though Coach keeps telling us to make sure we alternate. But we’re having fun. We’re trying to put some pressure on it because we want to play together.”

Is that accidentally with air quotes?

“Yeah, exactly,” Okafor said with a laugh.

'Trust the process' has a different, more personal meaning to Joel Embiid

'Trust the process' has a different, more personal meaning to Joel Embiid

CAMDEN, N.J. — Joel Embiid is all about trusting the process.

He manages to insert the well-known phrase into just about every interview, hashtags it on social media and soaks in the chants during games. 

While “trust the process” is commonly associated with former Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie’s patience-required approach to building the team — which resulted in three years of dismal losing and suffering setback after setback — Embiid has his personal take on the mantra.

“I think I have my own process,” Embiid said Friday at practice.

Embiid is playing for the first time this season after waiting two years to recover from foot injuries. His long-anticipated debut was a focal point of “the process,” and his return to the court marked a new chapter in the organization.

“I went through two surgeries, lost my brother, thought about some stuff I shouldn’t have thought about, so that’s my own process,” he said. “And then the process of going through the rehab and finally getting back on the court and getting the chance to finally play in the league, that’s my process.”

Embiid is now synonymous with the word. He credits Sixers fans for the moniker, which he added to his Instagram profile. 

“I don’t think it came from me,” he said. “Fans just started and then I just went along with it.”

Wednesday marked the next step in the process, both for the Sixers and Embiid. His regular-season debut (20 points, seven rebounds, two blocks) was a long time coming and garnered buzz all over the NBA world.

“I was the third pick and then I missed two years,” Embiid said. “The excitement in the city, everybody’s happy to finally see me play. Even though it was weird because a lot of people kind of wrote me off a long time ago saying that I’d never play as a Sixer, I’d never play in the league. So it’s all fun. Everybody’s going to have an opinion.”

He’s just got to trust in his own.