City 6 starts summer off right at Delco Pro-Am

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City 6 starts summer off right at Delco Pro-Am

HAVERFORD, Pa. -- Langston Galloway walked off the court at Haverford College’s Calvin J. Gooding Arena on Wednesday night and smiled sheepishly.

Halil Kanacevic, who was on hand to watch one of his Saint Joseph’s University classmates, shook his head in mock disapproval.

It was opening night at the Delaware County Pro-Am Men’s Summer Basketball League and Galloway had just scored a game-high 22 points on seven three-pointers. He even had a ridiculous off-the-backboard alley oop to himself after a play was blown dead. That was the good part.

The not-quite-as-good part? His Radano & Associates team beat the Widener University squad they were playing by more than 50 points, 92-39, in the most lopsided of the nine games played at Haverford on Wednesday. Hence, the sheepish smiles and head-shaking.

“We went out there the first couple of minutes slow, just warming up with each other,” Galloway said. “Shoot, then we started getting warmed up and we got going.”

As the league progresses throughout the summer, Galloway will almost certainly have more challenging matchups. The Delco Pro-Am, after all, is filled with some of the area’s best college players, incoming freshmen, recent alums, NBA players and even crafty old-timers.

Playing against that kind of stiff competition will come in handy as Galloway -- along with Kanacevic and Ronald Roberts -- prepares for his senior season on a St. Joe’s team looking to bounce back from a disappointing 2012-13 campaign in which the Hawks settled for an NIT berth after being picked to win the Atlantic 10.

“We’re the leaders on the team,” Galloway said. “They expect a lot out of us. We expect to go out every night, play hard and leave it all out there. If we do that, the outcomes will be the way we want.”

Galloway seemed to be in good spirits during the Delco Pro-Am’s chaotic opening night. He talked about getting back into shape and returning to Philly after just a few weeks home. He talked about trying to convince his coaches to set up a game in his home state of Louisiana next season. He talked about getting ready to go to Italy with his college teammates in August.

But mostly, he talked about trying to keep Phil Martelli encouraged during what’s been a very challenging time for the St. Joe’s coach. In the past couple of months, Martelli’s sister and sister-in-law died, his mother broke her hip and his son Jimmy resigned from Rutgers in the wake of the Mike Rice coaching scandal.

“I stay in his ear constantly,” Galloway said. “I tell him ‘Anything you need, I’m here.’ It’s been getting better for him. May and June were pretty tough. But now it’s the end of June and it’s about to be July, and he’s been feeling a lot better.”

Galloway said he also keeps in contact with C.J. Aiken, who decided to forgo his senior season at St. Joe’s to pursue a professional basketball career. Along with Carl Jones, the Hawks’ high-scoring senior guard, St. Joe’s will lose two big pieces to their starting lineup next season.

But Galloway believes the Hawks will be better, despite those losses.

“It might help us in the long run,” he said. “We’ll see.”

Penn’s rising seniors have dual title hopes
For Miles Cartwright and Fran Dougherty, the No. 1 goal is obviously to lead Penn to an Ivy League championship before they graduate next May.

But in the meantime, they have another title aspiration: To win the Delco Pro-Am.

On Wednesday, the Penn teammates got off to a good start as Dougherty scored 19 and Cartwright added 14 in a 71-68 win for Trad Jazz over Doc P’s.

“We’re trying to come out here and win as many games as possible,” Cartwright said. “I told Fran today when we were lifting that I want to win Delco to start the summer off right.”

Perhaps the best part of the opening-night performance was that it showed that Dougherty is well on his way back to full health after missing much of the 2012-13 campaign due to an illness (mono) and an injury (dislocated elbow). The forward’s absence was one of the main factors in the Quakers’ disappointing fifth-place finish in the Ivy League.

“It’s always great to see Fran on the court,” said Cartwright, who averaged 13.5 points per game last season. “When he went down, that was a big blow to us last year. But you know Fran’s one of our main guys and we count on him to win games and make plays for us. I’m really happy to see him out there 100 percent.”

The rising Penn seniors also got to play against a future teammate: Matt Howard.

Howard, who was among a handful of incoming Penn freshmen to play on various courts Wednesday night, finished with 13 points for his Doc P’s team. And Cartwright liked what he saw in the athletic guard.

“I’m just so impressed with his basketball IQ,” Cartwright said. “He shares the ball, he runs the floor, he looks for his shot and he scores. He’s a big-time athlete. I’m really excited and I think he’s going to be great for us.”

Temple domination
In the marquee game of the night, 2012 Delco Pro-Am champion Take Your Game To Another Level edged 2011 champ Omega Medical, 101-100.

Take Your Game To Another Level was led by mainly Temple alums, including former NBA player Mardy Collins (30 points). Omega Medical, meanwhile, was made up of mostly ex-Villanova stars, including the Toronto Raptors’ Kyle Lowry (18 points) and Reggie Redding (22 points).

Temple products poured in points on other courts too, with 2012 alum Ramone Moore scoring 35 in an 83-81 win for his Temple Under Armour Team 1 and rising senior Dalton Pepper scoring 28 in a loss.

Trace McSorley named Penn State's starting quarterback

Trace McSorley named Penn State's starting quarterback

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Trace McSorley will start at quarterback for Penn State when the Nittany Lions open against Kent State on Sept 3.

Coach James Franklin settled on the sophomore after McSorley battled redshirt freshman Tommy Stevens for the job through the spring and summer.

"We're excited what he brings to our offense," Franklin said Wednesday. "I think the biggest thing is he's been the backup quarterback for two years. He has game experience and there's value in that. You've been able to see it already, you're not projecting as much."

McSorley will make his first career start at home against Kent State.

"It's a lot of weight off my shoulders," McSorley said. "Over the whole offseason, Tommy and I were pushing each other. This team will be better because of how this competition went with us pushing each other."

Both quarterbacks are strong runners, but McSorley's experience gave him the edge.

His shiftiness was utilized in practice throughout his tenure as Christian Hackenberg's backup. He usually led the scout team against the top defense, offering a similar look to the opposing running quarterbacks Penn State would play.

Although he's played sparingly on Saturdays in that time, McSorley saw meaningful snaps in Penn State's bowl game in relief of an injured Hackenberg. Then, McSorley completed 14 of 17 passes for 142 yards and two touchdowns, ran seven times for 31 yards and nearly led a comeback against Georgia.

Now, McSorley will try and turn around a unit that's ranked 105th and 114th in total offense the last two seasons. He'll do so in a spread-based offense designed for a mobile quarterback and led by new offensive coordinator Joe Moorhead.

"I think the best thing about the way he runs the ball is he's savvy," linebacker Jason Cabinda said. "He sets up his cuts. You play a guy who's a statue in the pocket and you cover well, he gets sacked. Now we have another element. Not only do you have to worry about covering guys, but when that four or five seconds is up there's that option of scrambling, another aspect of the play you have to worry about."

Prosecutor says he doesn't believe Jerry Sandusky accuser's claim

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AP

Prosecutor says he doesn't believe Jerry Sandusky accuser's claim

BELLEFONTE, Pa. -- A former Pennsylvania prosecutor testified Tuesday he does not believe a man who reached a settlement with Penn State over a molestation claim is the same person seen by a witness being abused by Jerry Sandusky in a university football team shower.

Joe McGettigan, a former prosecutor who is now a lawyer in private practice, took the stand as the final witness during three days of testimony in Sandusky's bid for dismissal of charges or a new trial.

McGettigan said his opinion about the man who claims to be the person described as Victim 2 in court records is based on changes in the man's story, that he appears too old to be the boy in the shower and that he did not provide certain details to investigators until after the man who witnessed the attack had given his own story in open court.

Sandusky's grounds for appeal include a claim that McGettigan lied when he said during closing argument that Victim 2 was known "to God but not to us."

McGettigan said he did not believe the man's claim to be Victim 2 at the time of Sandusky's 2012 trial.

"I did not then and I do not now," McGettigan said.

Graduate assistant Mike McQueary has testified he saw Sandusky abusing a boy inside a team shower late on a Friday night in early 2001, and reported the matter to then-head coach Joe Paterno and other top administrators.

Sandusky was convicted of 45 counts of abuse of 10 boys after eight of them testified against him -- but not Victim 2.

McGettigan said the man who settled with Penn State was born in 1987, so he would have been about 14 at the time, but McQueary described Victim 2 as being about 10. McGettigan said the man was unable to properly describe the location of the attack and drew a map of a locker room that was not accurate.

The man denied to police in September 2011 that any abuse occurred and gave the same statement to an investigator working for Sandusky's lawyers. But after McQueary testified in a related preliminary hearing, he hired a lawyer and changed his story, claiming to have been sexually abused. Neither the man nor Penn State has disclosed the precise nature of his claim against the university or said how much he was paid to settle it.

McGettigan said Sandusky, who attended all three days of the Post-Conviction Relief Act hearing, "could at any time have told any number of persons" the identity of Victim 2. "He declined to say so."

Another former state prosecutor, Jonelle Eshbach, testified that her office set up a sting after a March 2011 story in The Patriot-News of Harrisburg disclosed details of the grand jury investigation that led to Sandusky's arrest about seven months later.

She and her supervisor, Frank Fina, placed a fake notice within the prosecution agency's file about someone who had been subpoenaed and then watched to see if it would produce a story that would indicate a leak within the attorney general's office. She said no one took the bait.

Fina, the third person to testify Tuesday, said his doubts about the man's claim to be Victim 2 were based in part on early questions about when the McQueary incident occurred. At first, it was publicly reported to be 2002, which the man confirmed. Later it was determined to have been 2001.

"There was a possibility that (he) had conformed his testimony to Mr. McQueary's recollection of the date," Fina said.

Sandusky previously lost direct appeals to the state's Supreme and Superior courts. The current process, presided over by the trial judge, is under the Post-Conviction Relief Act and therefore limited to newly discovered evidence, constitutional violations and ineffective lawyering.

The judge did not say when he would rule but indicated there may be additional proceedings.

Jerry Sandusky's appeal focuses on Victim 2's conflicting statements

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AP

Jerry Sandusky's appeal focuses on Victim 2's conflicting statements

BELLEFONTE, Pa. -- A man who says he was the boy observed being sexually abused by Jerry Sandusky in a Penn State shower more than 15 years ago gave conflicting statements to authorities and was considered to lack credibility, investigators said during an appeal hearing Monday.

The man has settled with Penn State based on a claim that he is Victim 2 and was seen by graduate assistant Mike McQueary being attacked by Sandusky, then an assistant football coach, in 2001. The man gave differing statements to Sandusky's lawyers and to police investigators, according to testimony, and neither side called him to the stand during the 2012 trial.

The identity of Victim 2, and the man's claim to be Victim 2, figures into Sandusky's bid for a new trial or to have charges dismissed because of a reference during lead prosecutor Joe McGettigan's closing argument before a jury convicted Sandusky of 45 counts of abuse involving 10 victims.

McGettigan told jurors there were "others unknown to us, to others presently known to God but not to us." The appeals hearing is Sandusky's chance to prove his claim that McGettigan was referring to Victim 2 and so he knew that statement was false.

The man who claims to be Victim 2 contacted Sandusky's then-lawyer, Joe Amendola, soon after Sandusky was first charged in November 2011 and gave a statement saying he was in the shower that night but had not been abused. He had also made a similar denial of abuse to investigators in September 2011, testified Cpl. Joseph Leiter, a retired state police investigator.

But he subsequently hired attorney Andrew Shubin, who testified Monday on the second day of the hearing that he believes his client is Victim 2 and was raped by Sandusky, who was in court. He is serving a 30- to 60-year sentence.

Asked if he had any doubts, Shubin said he was not sure how to answer that. But he said the man is his client and he would not represent anyone he did not believe.

Shubin declined to answer when asked whether he ever tried to hide the man's whereabouts from police and prosecutors, citing attorney-client privilege.

"I have never spoken about that issue and never waived that privilege," Shubin testified.

Anthony Sassano, an agent with the attorney general's office, testified that he heard from someone -- he said he wasn't sure whom -- that the man was "hidden at hunting camp somewhere so we couldn't find him to interview him."

Sassano said that the man contradicted himself to agents when asked if he ever told anyone of abuse and that his drawing of the locker room where he claims to have been seen by McQueary did not fit the actual Lasch Building locker room.

That "led me to believe he was never in that particular locker room," Sassano testified.

Prosecutors did not find the man credible, Sassano said.

"I don't know if they formed their opinion off my opinion or they had their own separate opinion," Sassano said. "We all arrived at the same conclusion."

Testimony on Monday also delved into claims of improper leaks of material from the grand jury that investigated Sandusky before he was charged. The hearing is expected to conclude Tuesday.

Sandusky testified during the first day of the hearing and strongly denied his guilt. He has already lost direct appeals to the state's Supreme and Superior courts and is now seeking relief under the Post-Conviction Relief Act that is confined to newly discovered evidence, constitutional violations and ineffective lawyering.