Ex-Penn State players support Paterno lawsuit

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Ex-Penn State players support Paterno lawsuit

STATE COLLEGE -- About 325 former Penn State players and coaches have signed a statement supporting the lawsuit filed by the family of former coach Joe Paterno and other former players seeking to overturn NCAA sanctions against the football program for the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal.

Former player Brian Masella released the letter Monday in support of the lawsuit, which was also filed last month by some coaches, trustees and faculty. Jacksonville Jaguars linebacker Paul Posluszny, and former NFL quarterbacks Kerry Collins and Todd Blackledge are among the notable names who signed on to the statement.

Masella said he and a few other former players organized the statement on their own after some of the plaintiffs explained their position in a letter to former players and sought their support.

He stressed the statement had no connection to the official football alumni group, the Football Letterman's Club -- which has roughly 1,100 members -- though some individual members have signed on their own.

The former players in the statement said they stood with the others in the case in demanding "fairness, due process, truth, and a just outcome. Everyone -- Sandusky's victims, Penn Staters, and the public at large -- deserves to know the complete truth."

As in the lawsuit, the former players in the statement took issue with the NCAA basing its strict sanctions on what they called the flawed report by former FBI director Louis Freeh on the scandal for the school.

Freeh concluded that Paterno and three former school officials concealed allegations against Sandusky, a retired defensive coordinator found guilty in June 2012 on dozens of criminal counts covering allegations on and off campus. Sandusky, 69, was sentenced to 30-to-60 years in prison.

Paterno died in January 2012. Freeh's report was released the following July, and the NCAA issued its sanctions less than two weeks later. The landmark penalties included a four-year bowl ban and steep scholarship cuts.

Paterno's family and the school officials have firmly denied there was a cover-up. The family earlier this year commissioned a critique which called Freeh's report a "rush to injustice."

Family attorney Wick Sollers praised the former players for a "powerful statement of support ... The purpose of the litigation is to have the issues reviewed in a forum where due process and facts matter."

The lawsuit filed several weeks ago argues the NCAA sidestepped its own rules with uncharacteristic speed in levying sanctions, and sought to raise fresh questions about Freeh's report.

"In speaking with a couple former players, we wanted to do something to support the (others) involved in the lawsuit," Masella, a 1975 graduate who played tight end and punter, said in a phone interview. "We had to start somewhere. It basically started to snowball."

When asked, Masella also said their actions don't take away from the full support that former players have for coach Bill O'Brien and the current team.

They backed O'Brien "100 percent," and wanted what was best for the current players in hoping to reverse the sanctions, he said.

The NCAA has not filed a response yet to the lawsuit. NCAA president Mark Emmert -- named as a defendant -- declined comment on individual cases last month.

"I'm perfectly fine to have an opportunity for us to state our case and have it heard in a court of law, then we'll let a legal system do its work," Emmert said in Irving, Texas, at a Big 12 meeting on May 30.

Earlier this month, two trustees said in an interview with The Associated Press that they hoped Penn State's focus on reforms in the aftermath of the scandal might eventually persuade the NCAA to reconsider the severe penalties.

Penn beats Dartmouth, 37-24, behind Torgersen's 3 TDs

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Penn beats Dartmouth, 37-24, behind Torgersen's 3 TDs

HANOVER, N.H. -- Alek Torgersen threw a touchdown pass and ran for two more scores as Pennsylvania rolled to a 37-24 victory over Dartmouth in the Ivy League opener for both teams on Friday night.

Torgersen finished with 188 yards passing, and bounced back from having his 17-game TD-passing streak snapped in a 31-17 loss at Fordham last week. He capped the Quakers' opening drive with a 28-yard scoring strike to Christian Pearson. Torgersen also bullied in from the 4 and 3-yard lines to help stretch Penn's lead to 35-10 late in the third quarter.

Tre Solomon ran for 107 yards on 29 carries and had scoring runs of 1 and 7 yards for Penn (1-2, 1-0).

Jack Heneghan was 27 of 43 for 289 yards passing, and threw two touchdown passes late in the fourth quarter to lead Dartmouth (2-1, 0-1).

It was second-year Penn coach Ray Priore's first win against Dartmouth.

Temple's Trey Lowe to redshirt as recovery from car accident continues

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Temple's Trey Lowe to redshirt as recovery from car accident continues

Temple head coach Fran Dunphy had a feeling some bad news would come regarding guard Trey Lowe's status for the coming season. On Friday, it was made official.

Lowe, a freshman who suffered serious upper-body injuries in a single-car crash in his native New Jersey last February, will miss all of the 2016-17 season and take a medical redshirt as he continues to recover, Dunphy announced on Friday.

"We all feel that this is in the best interest for Trey, as a person, a basketball player and a student," Dunphy said in a statement released by the university. "We feel at this time that concentrating on his rehabilitation this year will give him the best chance to come back strong and healthy for 2017-18. Trey will still be a big part of the team during this redshirt year, while continuing to work with our medical and strength team in preparation for his full return to action.”

Lowe was just starting to come into his own at the collegiate level around the time of the unfortunate accident. In a Feb. 17 game at the Liacouras Center against then-No.1 and eventual national champion Villanova, Lowe dropped a career-high 21 points. Though the Owls lost, 83-67, Lowe had made an impact and earned the trust of Dunphy, which isn't easy to do as a freshman.

A three-star recruit, Lowe played in all 28 games, including five starts, prior to his injury and averaged 4.8 points and 1.8 assists in 12.3 minutes per game. He would be a redshirt sophomore if he's ready to return for the 2017-18 season.

The absence of Lowe will leave the Owls particularly thin at guard this year. You may recall senior point guard Josh Brown, who was to be counted on as the Owls' leader this season, tore his Achilles tendon during an offseason workout. His status for this season is still unknown as he continues to rehab from his injury.

Junior forward Obi Enechionyia, who averaged 11 points per game last season, is Temple's leading returning scorer.

The onus to produce at guard will be placed on redshirt senior Daniel Dingle and sophomore Shizz Alston, Jr. True freshmen Quinton Rose and Alani Moore will also likely have to chip in.

They have just over a month to get ready. Temple hosts La Salle in both schools' season opener on Friday, Nov. 11 at the Liacouras Center.