Instant Replay: Villanova 73, No. 5 Louisville 64

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Instant Replay: Villanova 73, No. 5 Louisville 64

BOX SCORE

Villanova shook up the Big East and the national rankings with a 73-64 win over No. 5 Louisville on Tuesday night at the Wells Fargo Center.

Archaf Yacoubou drained a three-pointer with four minutes remaining to break a tie at 53, and James Bell hit a three of his own 51 seconds later to help the Wildcats secure the victory.

Turning point
Villanova can look at the end of the game to see how they pulled off the upset, but the Wildcats should really trace back to the first frame to see where the game was won.

The Cats got the faithful rocking when Tony Chenault followed up a thunderous dunk by Daniel Ochefu with a three-pointer to give Villanova a 10-point lead midway through the first half. But Villanova didnt keep its foot on the gas.

The Cardinals began to shake their early shooting woes and turned up the full-court pressure defensively to the tune of a 12-0 run to get back in the game.

The Wildcats went nearly five minutes without a point but were able to regroup late in the half and take a 30-28 lead into intermission.

Teams typically wilt after runs like that from top-tier squads like Louisville. The Wildcats proved to be anything but typical on this night.

Big man on campus
Ryan Arcidiacono and JayVaughn Pinkston led Villanova with 13 points apiece. Darrun Hilliard and Mouphtaou Yarou each had 11 points, while Bell added 10.

Wayne Blackshear scored 17 points for Louisville. Peyton Siva scored 15 points and handed out 11 assists.

Inside the box score
Villanova, which leads the Big East in turnovers with 16.3 per game, gave the ball away 19 times. Louisville came into Tuesday forcing the second-most turnovers per game in the nation at 19.7 a game.

Villanova shot 22 of 48 (45.8 percent) from the field and 7 of 15 from three-point range.

Louisville was a dismal 12 of 24 from the free-throw line.

Louisville's Russ Smith -- the Big Easts third-leading scorer with 19.3 points per game -- scored just eight points on 2-of-13 shooting.

When was the last time
Tuesday might marked the 18th meeting between the two schools. The Wildcats win tied the series at nine apiece.

Villanova is now 4-1 against Louisville in games played at the Wells Fargo Center.

Scouts honor
Scouts from several NBA teams were in attendance for the Big East battle, including Sixers director of player personnel Courtney Witte and Brooklyn Nets general manager Billy King.

Whats next?
Villanovas run against stiff competition continues on Saturday when the Wildcats face No. 3 Syracuse back at the Wells Fargo Center at 11 a.m..

The Wildcats were handed a 72-61 defeat by the Orange at the Carrier Dome back on Jan. 12 to snap their seven-game win streak.

E-mail Matt Haughton at mhaughton@comcastsportsnet.com.

St. Joe's, Lamarr Kimble cut down on mistakes in win over Penn

St. Joe's, Lamarr Kimble cut down on mistakes in win over Penn

BOX SCORE

The last thing Saint Joseph’s basketball players usually read before they leave the locker room is one word: “Win.” It’s the word coach Phil Martelli typically goes with.

But after three straight defeats and losses in four of five since losing top scorer Shavar Newkirk to a season-ending knee injury on Dec. 30, Martelli decided to change what he wrote on the board.

Saturday night at the Palestra, in a St. Joe’s home game against Big 5 rival Penn, Martelli said he wrote: “Chase the taste.”

Led by sophomore point guard Lamarr Kimble, who played all 40 minutes, the Hawks tasted a victory, holding off the Quakers, 78-71 (see Instant Replay).

“To walk around for two weeks without a win, it’s been miserable,” Martelli said. “And I haven’t made it easier on them. Because we are not injured. This team is not injured. The team that got dressed in that locker room and came out on the court, that’s our team. Everybody starts the conversation with: ‘Due to the injuries have you…’ No. It has nothing to do with it. There’s injuries all over the country. 

“But the recurring themes, the turnovers, really, in a way, insanity. Shot selection at times, insanity. All of that had to be corrected and it had to be corrected in a harsh way. I wasn’t really that pleased with myself but I had to get after them and make sure they knew no one felt sorry for them.”

Kimble, especially.

With Newkirk gone for the year, the Hawks are probably going to go as far as the Neumann-Goretti grad takes them. In a familiar building, one which he tasted Catholic League titles in, Kimble led all scorers with 23 points. He added five assists and three rebounds. 

But, most importantly, he had just two turnovers. In the five previous contests since Newkirk’s injury, Kimble had 31 turnovers, including nine last time out in a loss to Massachusetts. 

“First of all his leadership hasn’t changed at all,” Martelli said. “He’s been very forceful, very accountable. He has not played well.”

You wouldn’t have known it Saturday night. 

The confident guard shot 6 of 13 from the floor, including 2 for 5 from deep, and made nine of his 11 free throw attempts. In a game which the Hawks utilized a speed advantage to play, as Martelli called it, “downhill,” Kimble and James Demery (9 of 12 from the line) really opened up the floor in the second half after Penn had battled back from a 15-point deficit to take a brief lead.

The Hawks (9-9, 2-4 Atlantic 10) got to the line 43 times (shooting 72 percent) while Penn (6-9) took just 15 free throws.

Demery had 15 points for the game, 11 coming in the second half. Freshman Charlie Brown contributed a career-high 19 points and nine boards.

The three of them were critical down the stretch in pulling away from Penn, which got 19 points from Matt Howard and 15 from freshman Ryan Betley.

Betley hit a big corner three to pull Penn within four, 66-62, with 2:44 left. But after two Brown free throws and a stop on defense, Kimble was fouled shooting a three pointer by Penn’s Jackson Donahue with the shot clock expiring. The miss would have given Penn a chance with a manageable clock.

Instead, he made two of his three attempts and pushed the lead to eight with just over a minute and a half left.

“There was a lot going into this game,” Kimble said. “One, playing at the Palestra, everybody knows the amount of history. It’s the Mecca, basically. The place to play in college basketball. Two, reversing our three-game losing streak and trying to start fresh. We know that if we took our losses and took our stunts that we still have the chance to improve as a group.

“It does a lot. It’s definitely a confidence booster. We’ve got a lot of young kids. Young kids ride on winning. When you’re losing, it’s difficult to turn that around when you’re younger. We don’t have the most experienced group so we definitely have to take our wins and just ride on that and keep pushing. Hopefully the energy has changed and it’ll hopefully carry on to the next game.”

That next game is Tuesday.

“Tomorrow we start for a tough game at St. Bonaventure,” Martelli said. “And we start that in eighth place. That’s average for the league. And 9-9 (overall) is average."

Up to this point, they’ve been exactly that: average. Martelli acknowledged as much.

But Saturday changed the taste in the locker room. And provided enough proof to say Kimble’s play will go a long way in determining the fate of the Hawks.

“I’m with him. He’s with me,” Martelli said. “And we’ll ride this out.”

Instant Replay: St. Joe's 78, Penn 71

Instant Replay: St. Joe's 78, Penn 71

BOX SCORE

With two teams entering action on three-game losing skids and still trying to find footing midway through the year, it was one of those games - especially in the Big 5 - where, quite simply, someone had to win. 

And in a game that featured lengthy runs on both sides, Saint Joseph’s ended up being that team, holding off the University of Pennsylvania, 78-71, at the Palestra Saturday night.

St. Joe's, the official home team on the ticket at the Palestra, led by as many as 15 in the first half before a 12-1 Quakers run led to a four-point Hawks lead, 35-31, at the break.

Penn got a hold of the lead, 36-35, with an early second half spurt but the Hawks, led by Lamarr Kimble’s 23 points (13 in the second half), were able to make more plays and pick up their first win in two weeks.

The loss was the Quakers’ fourth straight. They’ve yet to win in 2017.

Joining Kimble in double figures for the Hawks were Charlie Brown (career-high 19 points), James Demery (15) and Chris Clover (10).

Penn was paced by Matt Howard’s 19 points. Freshman Ryan Betley had 15, including a couple key threes.

Betley’s corner triple got the Quakers within four, 66-62, with 2:44 left.

But the Hawks scored the next four to seize control.

Turning point
In a close second half looking for a turning point, perhaps a whistle was the moment the game turned.

Late in the shot clock, with the Hawks clinging to a six-point lead, Kimble rose up from deep and was fouled by Jackson Donahue of Penn. All Quakers coach Steve Donahue could do was walk quietly to the other end of his bench in disgust. Kimble made 2 of 3 to push the St. Joe's lead to 70-62 with a little more than a minute to go.

A stop, which Penn would have had if Kimble wasn’t fouled, and the Quakers would have had a chance to cut it to a two-possession game with a manageable clock.

What it means
St. Joe’s, now 51-35 all-time against Penn, needed a confidence booster as it turns back to the crowded Atlantic 10.

Penn is still trying to find the right rotations to win games.

Inside the box score
Penn took 18 shots from beyond the arc in the first half. The Quakers made four of them. They made four on 14 threes in the second half.

Off turnovers, Penn outscored St. Joe’s, 17-4.

The Hawks won the battle in the paint, 36-18.

Penn had 32 fouls as a team and had two players (Tyler Hamilton and Betley) foul out.

Kimble, coming off a nine turnover game, went 9-11 from the free-throw line and had five assists against two turnovers.

Up next
St. Joe’s gets back into A-10 play Tuesday at St. Bonaventure before hosting La Salle next Saturday on City Ave.

Penn plays at La Salle Wednesday before a tough Ivy League road weekend the following weekend at Harvard and Dartmouth to kick off February.