Joe Paterno Nominated for the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Joe Paterno Nominated for the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Penn State head football coach Joe Paterno has been nominated for the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The award is the nation's highest civilian honor.

Per Executive Order 9586: "The medal may be awarded by the President as provided in this order to any person who has made an especially meritorious contribution to (1) the security or national interests of the United States, or (2) world peace, or (3) cultural or other significant public or private endeavors."

If awarded, Paterno would become the 21st individual from the sports world and only the third college coach to receive the medal, joining Bear Bryant (1983) and John Wooden (2003).
Thanks to NBC10.com, we can provide for you the letter of nomination signed by U.S Senators Bob Casey (D-PA), Pat Toomey (R-PA) and U.S. House Representative Glenn Thompson (R-PA), the last of whom represents the town of State College.

Here, in its entirety, is the letter that has been sent for the consideration of President Barack Obama. Think this could swing an election? You never know.

Dear Mr. President:

We are writing to request that you consider the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) football coach Joe Paterno for the Presidential Medal of Freedom given his substantial contributions to collegiate athletics, higher education and American society.

Coach Paterno’s accomplishments on the football field are nothing short of legendary. During his 45-year tenure at Penn State, he has amassed 402 career wins – more than any other coach in Division I history. He has coached five undefeated teams, two national championship teams, won three Big Ten conference championships, and been named “Coach Of The Year” five times by the American Football Coaches Association.

While these numbers are unrivaled, Coach Paterno’s contributions to society off the field are even more noteworthy. His commitment to the success of student athletes under his guidance is abundantly clear. Under his tenure, Penn State’s football team has had 16 Hall of Fame Scholar-Athletes, 47 Academic All-Americans, and 18 NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship winners – evidence of his dedication to helping his players excel in both athletic and academic endeavors.

Coach Paterno and his family have been incredibly generous, serving as the National Spokesman for the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association, supporting the Special Olympics, and donating millions of dollars to the University for academic programs and libraries. It is common for a university to name a field of play after a coach that has contributed immensely to that institution’s athletic program, but Coach Paterno’s name has been added to a wing of Penn State’s Pattee Library due to his immense contributions to academics at Penn State.

The Presidential Medal of Freedom has historically been awarded for meritorious contributions to the national interests of the United States. Coach Paterno’s contributions exceed this standard by a considerable degree and we respectfully request that you provide him your utmost consideration for the award. It is not unprecedented to award this Presidential Medal of Freedom to collegiate coaches as both Paul “Bear” Bryant and John Wooden have been honored in the past. We believe it is important for Coach Paterno to share in this esteemed recognition.

Coach Paterno over the years has shown tremendous character and loyalty. Throughout his time at Penn State, he has remained committed to reaching goals without sacrificing the ideals that are central to higher education. His contributions to college athletics and higher education, as well as the content of his character, make Coach Joe Paterno deserving of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Thank you for your consideration of this matter.

Sincerely,

Robert P. Casey, Jr.
United States Senator

Pat Toomey 
United States Senator

Glenn ‘GT’ Thompson
Member of Congress

Orthopedist on Ben Simmons' injury: 'The prognosis is good'

Orthopedist on Ben Simmons' injury: 'The prognosis is good'

On Friday, Sixers fans got some bad news when the team revealed that No. 1 overall pick Ben Simmons fractured the fifth metatarsal in his right foot.

The Sixers didn't give a timetable for his return, saying that they were reviewing treatment options for the 6-foot-10 point-forward.

As a guest on CSNPhilly's Sportsnet Central, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Mark Schwartz gave a little insight into Simmons' injury. Schwartz is not treating Simmons, but has dealt with similar injuries. Schwartz believes the prognosis is good for the Sixers' rookie.

"The big question is where the exact location of this fracture is," Schwartz said. "That will dictate the prognosis and the treatment. If it's at the base of the fifth metatarsal, it's usually a non-surgical treatment. It's usually a cast/boot for six to eight weeks and return to play somewhere around eight weeks."

That would be great news considering Sixers fans didn't get to see Nerlens Noel the year he was drafted and are still awaiting the debut of 2014 draft pick Joel Embiid. 

Schwartz warns that the injury could be something known as a Jones fracture, which would likely require surgery and the recovery could be three to four months. The prognosis would still be good, according to Schwartz, but other NBA players have had lengthy recoveries with a similar injury.

"The prognosis is still good, but we know that Kevin Durant had a Jones fracture and he was out for an entire season because of it not healing," Schwartz said. "But the prognosis is good, however, the question is whether it's going to require surgery or not."

For more from Schwartz on Simmons' injury and possible timetable, check out the video above.

Penn beats Dartmouth, 37-24, behind Torgersen's 3 TDs

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USA Today Images

Penn beats Dartmouth, 37-24, behind Torgersen's 3 TDs

HANOVER, N.H. -- Alek Torgersen threw a touchdown pass and ran for two more scores as Pennsylvania rolled to a 37-24 victory over Dartmouth in the Ivy League opener for both teams on Friday night.

Torgersen finished with 188 yards passing, and bounced back from having his 17-game TD-passing streak snapped in a 31-17 loss at Fordham last week. He capped the Quakers' opening drive with a 28-yard scoring strike to Christian Pearson. Torgersen also bullied in from the 4 and 3-yard lines to help stretch Penn's lead to 35-10 late in the third quarter.

Tre Solomon ran for 107 yards on 29 carries and had scoring runs of 1 and 7 yards for Penn (1-2, 1-0).

Jack Heneghan was 27 of 43 for 289 yards passing, and threw two touchdown passes late in the fourth quarter to lead Dartmouth (2-1, 0-1).

It was second-year Penn coach Ray Priore's first win against Dartmouth.