JoePa Speaks As Two Top Penn State Officials Step Down

JoePa Speaks As Two Top Penn State Officials Step Down

The disgusting drama surrounding Jerry Sandusky and Penn State University continued to unfold late Sunday evening when athletic director Tim Curley and the other top university official charged with perjury, VP for finance and business Gary Schultz, stepped down from their current roles at the university.

It was just hours earlier that Joe Paterno released a statement on the ugly matter.

The announcement of the two men stepping down from their roles came following an emergency meeting of Penn State's Board of Directors on Sunday night.

From the Associated Press:

Penn State athletic director Tim Curley requested to be placed on administrative leave so he could devote the time needed to defend himself against perjury and other charges, university President Graham Spanier said. Gary Schultz, vice president for finance and business, will step down and go back into retirement, Spanier said. He declined to comment to reporters after the meeting.

University spokesman Bill Mahon said resignations of famed football coach Joe Paterno and Spanier weren't discussed at the meeting.

I think it's worth noting that Curley was only placed on administrative leave.

As far as Joe Pa and University President Spanier, it could only be a matter of time until they are out as well.

As Paterno pointed out in his statement earlier Sunday, I think it's wise to continue to allow the facts to come out before making too quick of judgement on all names mentioned, or grouping some who may not be directly involved in the same category as the abominable Sandusky.

"I understand that people are upset and angry, but let’s be fair and let the legal process unfold," Paterno said.

While many, such as the Inquirer's Bob Ford, are calling for Paterno's ouster, I believe most of those people believe Joe Pa knew of the disturbing graphic nature of the alleged shower incident involving Victim 2. According to Paterno, he did not know of those sickening details.

From the New York Times:

On Sunday, Paterno issued a statement insisting that the graduate assistant had not told him of the extent of the sexual assault that he said he witnessed, only that he had seen something inappropriate involving Sandusky and the child. 

What Joe knew and when he knew it are likely key factors in whether or not this could be a most ugly finish to what had been a historical career for one of sports most respected men.

But the above Times piece also points out that just because Joe Pa may have acted appropriately according to the law and/or chain of command, that doesn't necessarily mean he has clean hands.

From Nicholas P. Carfardi, whose expertise in the area comes from covering the Roman Catholtic Church's sex abuse scandal: "It’s not enough to say you have done all that the law requires of you.
If you know nothing is being done to stop the abuse, the moral
obligation kicks in."

The alleged crimes committed by a man intimately involved with the Penn State football program are part of one of the biggest scandals we've ever seen in sports. How Sandusky was able to continue down that path for so long is simply baffling. Somebody had to enable it. And that's incredibly sad.

These are dark days for Penn State.



>>Joe Must Go: Bob Ford on Paterno's Role in the Sandusky Scandal

>>Sexual Abuse Charges Filed Against Jerry Sandusky; Penn State Officials Charged With Perjury and Failure to Report

Doug Pederson not afraid to get agressive with play-calling

Doug Pederson not afraid to get agressive with play-calling

Talk to Doug Pederson and he comes across … what’s a nice way to put it … dry?

Very nice guy. Very friendly. Very down to Earth. But not the most dynamic personality in public.

Which is why his personality on gameday has been so surprising.

Pederson is a risk taker as a playcaller. Aggressive and fearless.

Whether it’s going for it on fourth down with the lead, going for two after a successful PAT or throwing deep in a situation that doesn’t necessarily call for it, Pederson has proven to be the proverbial riverboat gambler that Chip Kelly was expected to be but never became.

“My personality is probably a little more conservative by nature, I think,” Pederson said Monday. “You'd probably agree with that.”

Pederson got a laugh with that comment because his public persona is exactly the opposite of his gameday demeanor.

It only took one day before we all got a taste of Pederson’s fearlessness.

In the season opener against the Browns, with the Eagles clinging to a 15-10 lead and a rookie quarterback making his first NFL appearance and a 4th-and-4 at the Browns’ 40--yard-line, he kept the offense on the field.

Carson Wentz responded by connecting with Zach Ertz on a five-yard gain to move the chains, and one play later, the Eagles took command on Wentz’s 35-yard TD pass to Nelson Agholor.

Six weeks in, the Eagles are 5 for 5 on fourth down. Only the Falcons have converted more fourth downs in the NFL this year, and they’re 6 for 10.

In the win over the Bears, the Eagles were 3 for 3 on fourth down, their best fourth-down conversion day in nine years.

This is the first time in 14 years the Eagles have converted five or more fourth downs through six games.

According to Pro Football Reference, the Eagles are one of only seven teams in NFL history to attempt five or more fourth down plays through six games and still be at 100 percent. The Lions are also 5 for 5 this year.

Pederson said analytics are a big part of his decision-making process, but he also trusts his instincts.

“I think it's both,” Pederson said. “But I trust our guys and I trust our offensive line and I think it sends a great message to the rest of the team, to the defense and special teams, that, ‘Hey, if we can convert this and stay on the field,’ it sends a good message.

“And on the other side of that, if you do convert, (it’s about) the message you send to the other team and the fact that you're going to stay aggressive.”

The Eagles are 29th-best in the NFL on third down at just 34 percent. But they’re one of only three teams that’s at 100 percent on fourth down.

“It's kind of a crazy deal when you're not great on third down, but you can be 5 for 5 on fourth down and convert them,” Pederson said. “It's a weird deal. But credit to the guys for the execution.

“I'm going to continue to look at it. I don't ever want to be in a position that I'm going to jeopardize the team at the time (by being too aggressive). Looking at the five fourth-down decisions this year, I don’t think they put us in any harm at that time.”

Wentz is 3 for 3 for 21 yards on fourth down, with the four-yard completion to Ertz, a seven-yard first down to Jordan Matthews in the Bears game and a nine-yard to Dorial Green-Beckham, also in the win in Chicago.

He also rushed six yards for a first down on a 4th-and-2 Sunday in the win over the Vikings. The Eagles’ other fourth-down conversion this year was Ryan Mathews’ one-yard TD on a 4th-and-goal against Chicago.

Pederson said as an assistant coach under Andy Reid, he always found himself asking himself whether he would be conservative or aggressive in crucial situations.

We’re all learning the answer now.

“Yeah, you definitely put yourself in those situations, as a coordinator and a position coach,” he said. “Putting yourself in those spots, it's a lot easier when you're not making the decision obviously to go, ‘Oh, yeah, I would have not gone for it there or not gone for it there.’

“Now, being in this position, it's my tail on the line if we don't convert.”

6 months later, Cubs' Kyle Schwarber returns for World Series Game 1

6 months later, Cubs' Kyle Schwarber returns for World Series Game 1

CLEVELAND — Chicago Cubs slugger Kyle Schwarber's rehab finished just in time for the World Series.

Schwarber will bat fifth and be the designated hitter for the National League champions in Game 1 on Tuesday night against Cleveland's Corey Kluber. Schwarber hasn't played in the majors since tearing ligaments in his left knee on April 7 in a collision with teammate Dexter Fowler.

Dallas Cowboys orthopedic surgeon Dr. Daniel Cooper operated 12 days later to repair torn anterior cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments. He was expected to miss the rest of the season but was cleared to return on Oct. 17.

Schwarber played a pair of games in the Arizona Fall League, going 1 for 6 with a double and two walks, and flew to Cleveland on Monday.