Middle finger last year, indifference this year: Halil Kanacevic talks about St. Joe's vs. Nova on Saturday

Middle finger last year, indifference this year: Halil Kanacevic talks about St. Joe's vs. Nova on Saturday

One year after saluting Villanova fans with both of his middle fingers and then promptly blowing the game, St. Joe’s forward Halil Kanacevic was asked by reporters this week if he was relieved that the Hawks' next game against ’Nova -  this Saturday at 6 p.m. - is in his home gym.

And he responded with what was the equivalent of a shrug. A manly shrug.

“Personally, I don’t care,” he said. “It could have been there. I have no problem with it. But whatever, it’s here. I’ll go play there – I don’t care. Whatever happened last year happened last year. It’s a new year.”

Hear that, ’Nova fans? Kanacevic isn’t scared of your middle-finger-prompted heckling. And he’ll surely get plenty of that from the Main Liners that were able to secure a seat in tiny Hagan Arena for Saturday’s Big 5 showdown in Philadelphia.

But there might not be too many of them. For my CSNPhilly.com game preview, Kanacevic told me that “getting tickets is harder than getting tickets for the Super Bowl” and that he can’t even get some of his family members seats in the cozy gym.

The fans that do make it inside the building will almost certainly see a great game (perhaps a court-storming if St. Joe's pulls off the win against the 14th-ranked team?) but they probably won’t see any more obscene gestures. Kanacevic has learned his lesson that giving the finger to an entire section of students is not exactly the smartest thing to do.

“I probably should be the one that dwells on it the most,” he said. “It happened. I learned from it. I’m not gonna do it again. That’s pretty much all I can say about it, honestly. But whether the game being here, there, people dwelling on it, that’s really out of my mind. I’m just worried about winning a basketball game.”

Another award: Carson Wentz named NFL Offensive Rookie of the Month

Another award: Carson Wentz named NFL Offensive Rookie of the Month

Three games into his NFL career, Carson Wentz might need a bigger trophy case.

The 23-year-old, who picked up his first NFC Offensive Player of the Week award for his performance against Pittsburgh, has been named the NFL's Offensive Rookie of the Month for September.

Yes, Wentz's first NFL month was a special one.

The No. 2 pick from North Dakota State has completed 64.7 percent of his passes for 769 yards, five touchdowns and zero interceptions. He's the first rookie in NFL history to put up those numbers in the first three games of a career. And his 102 straight passing attempts without an interception is also a rookie record.

It's hard to believe that a little over a week before the season began, Wentz was scheduled to be the Eagles' third-string quarterback and have a redshirt year. That all changed when de facto GM Howie Roseman traded away starter Sam Bradford and the team decided to start the rookie.

While many thought the decision to start Wentz was the beginning of a long rebuilding year, the rookie has the Eagles off to a fast 3-0 start. Wentz has played very well, but has also been aided by a stout defense, led by NFC Defensive Player of the Month Fletcher Cox.

This week, Wentz is spending some time hunting while the Eagles are on their bye week. He bagged another trophy on Thursday.

The team will be back in action on Oct. 9 in Detroit to face the Lions.

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Watch: Joel Embiid can't get over how much he trusts the process

Watch: Joel Embiid can't get over how much he trusts the process

Joel Embiid really trusts the process. 

And he'll tell you as much over and over.

In fact, JoJo said it so much yesterdady that he was cracking himself up about just how much he trusts the process.

By most accounts, Joel was a bit rusty in the first couple of practices to kick off training camp, but, you know, you've just got to trust the process.

And he does. Trust the process.