One Year Later: Penn State Meets Nebraska

One Year Later: Penn State Meets Nebraska

It has been quite the year for Penn State and the football program. Now a
year and change removed from the startling and haunting revelations
from the Jerry Sandusky scandal and a full year and more removed from
the final game coached by Joe Paterno, one hugely scrutinized trial,
unprecedented sanctions and the naming of a new head coach, here we
are.

It is difficult at times to think about just how
much has changed over the past year in the once quiet and isolated town
of State College, Pennsylvania. Putting anything in to words, at times,
can be challenging because there simply is still now way to fully
comprehend just what happened.

But as we enter the
second weekend of November this year’s Penn State football team is
already marking their place in program history as one of the most
inspirational and memorable teams in school history. Those who have
stayed committed to the program -- be it due to a lack of options so
close to the start of the season or a desire to see this program through
tough times -- will forever be remembered for their dedication and
loyalty to what is a still a proud program looking to show what they are
really all about. No matter if Penn State loses their last three games
of the season, no matter who stands by the idea there should not be
football played in Beaver Stadium this season, and no matter how long
jokes related to their university will be shared by rivals, this year’s
team is deserving of respect.
This week they look for a
signature win to add to their bizarre 2012
season.

Penn State visits Nebraska for a
mid-afternoon Big Ten crossover matchup with plenty riding on the
outcome. Penn State’s division championship hopes are still within
reach, sitting just one game back of Ohio State. Penn State will not be
heading to the postseason but at least a share of a division
championship is still out there to grab. On the other hand, Nebraska has
become the team many suspect will represent the Big Ten in Pasadena in
the Rose Bowl in January. A win for either in Lincoln this weekend will
move the winner one step closer to a division
championship.

Penn State has played exceptionally
well on the road in Big Ten play this season, which should be a
tremendous credit to Bill O’Brien and the coaching staff. The Nittany
Lions have outscored their opponents 72-6 in the first half of road
games this season, and 123-47 overall. Matt McGloin’s passing, the
blossoming of sophomore wide receiver Allen Robinson and the consistent
play of the tight ends has proven tough to combat by Big Ten foes, but
Nebraska figures to be the stiffest road test of the season for Penn
State.

Nebraska has always run the ball well, form
the glory days of the triple-option led by guys like Tommie Frazier to
today’s team led by Taylor Martinez. Nothing should shock anyone who has
been watching Nebraska for a while now. The Huskers will run, run, run.
Rex Burkhead may not be fully available this weekend but even without
last year’s breakout Big Ten player in the backfield, Ameer Abdullah, is
more than capable of picking up the load for Nebraska, and Martinez has
been known to do his damage on the ground. Last week Martinez rushed
for over 200 yards to lead the Huskers to a key victory. For Penn State,
strength and conditioning will have to be the key in order to avoid
being run down the way they were Ohio State against two weeks ago in
Beaver Stadium. It will be important for Penn State to realize that it
is going to give up yards on the ground.

It just has
to make sure it doesn't overcommit agains the run, making things easy
for Martinez downfield. Martinez this season appears to be a more
confident passing game, but he is still prone to make some questionable
decisions with the football. Forcing Martinez to scramble for his life
will be easier said than done. You also never know which Martinez will
show up. Will it be the two-interception or four-touchdown
QB?

Penn State has the defense to keep things
interesting, and the offense has the potential to give Nebraska a solid
test as well. But playing in Lincoln is tough.

This
season has Penn State shown it knows what tough is. On Saturday
afternoon we find out just how tough they really are.

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”

Report: Sixers 'will take a hard look' at Jrue Holiday in free agency

Report: Sixers 'will take a hard look' at Jrue Holiday in free agency

Has The Process come full circle?

The Sixers "will take a hard look" at point guard Jrue Holiday in free agency, according to ESPN's Zach Lowe

Holiday, of course, was the Sixers' starting PG from 2009-13, before he was traded on draft night by then-GM Sam Hinkie for Nerlens Noel and a future first-round pick (which became Elfrid Payton, who was traded for Dario Saric).

In four seasons since, Holiday has averaged 15.3 points, 3.4 rebounds, 6.8 assists and 1.4 steals for the Pelicans. He's fought injury and missed 122 games since joining New Orleans.

The Pelicans have Anthony Davis but little else. They're going to need to make some tough decisions moving forward and one will be with Holiday.

As Lowe points out, there aren't many teams in need of a point guard — he lists the Sixers, Kings, Knicks and maybe the Magic as players for a PG in free agency.

"[Holiday] fits what [the Sixers] need around Ben Simmons, and the hilariousness of Philly bringing Holiday back after flipping him to start The Process is irresistible," Lowe writes.

Holiday has never been a great three-point shooter but he's been decent from long-range his entire career, topping out at 39 percent and sitting at 36.8 percent over eight NBA seasons.

He's coming off a four-year, $41 million contract, and although he has a lengthy injury history, he'll still command a nice-sized contract in free agency, especially with the cap expected to increase again.