Owls lack scoring punch in loss to No. 21 UConn

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Owls lack scoring punch in loss to No. 21 UConn

BOX SCORE

They were struggling to win before. And that's when Quenton DeCosey was making more than half of everything he threw at the basket.

The Temple Owls failed to follow up their upset win over No. 23 SMU, falling on Thursday night to No. 21 UConn, 68-55, at the Liacouras Center (see Instant Replay).

The loss drops Temple to 7-18 this season and a 2-11 in the American. Temple's 18 losses are tied for its most under Dunphy -- the 2006-07 Owls had 18 his first year -- and are also tied for the most in his 25-year coaching career.

"We're in a stretch where [we're playing] five Top 25 teams in a row," Dunphy said.

"I think, we've looked at it, we will have played 12 times against teams that have been in the Top 25 at some point during the course of the year. But that's what you want, you want that challenge, and we've been presented with that."

DeCosey led the way with a team-high 16 points on 5 for 15 shooting. Nothing any of the Owls did Thursday could be called efficient. Temple went 19 for 56 shooting from the field (33.9 percent) and 5 for 18 from three (27.8 percent).

Though the defense was much improved from the last time these two teams played -- when Temple let UConn score 90 en route to a 24-point loss -- it was the offense that cost the Owls this time around.

Temple went through two different stretches -- one lasting 6:27 and one lasting 9:48 -- without a field goal.

"We struggled to score against a really good defensive team," Dunphy said. "[UConn center] Amida Brimah changed a bunch of shots, but we had our share of open looks from the perimeter. Obviously, we didn't do a great job of knocking some of those down.

"There were other times when we had some poor choices. We needed to come to jump stops, and look for more drive-and-kicks than we did trying to drive all the way to the rim."

Still, Dunphy said he was pleased with most of the looks. His team just couldn't knock down its open shots.

DeCosey went 0 for 5 from three and senior leading scorer Dalton Pepper was a disastrous 4 for 18 from the field. DeCosey did, however, grab a career-high eight rebounds.

It's been a tough stretch for DeCosey, who started the season so well. After a poor opening game against Penn, the sophomore wing ripped off a 13-game stretch in which he was shooting 52.5 percent from the field. He had scored in double figures in 17 straight games.

But in his last nine outings, in which Temple has gone 2-7, DeCosey has made only 37 of his last 118 attempts (31.3 percent).

Dunphy has been leaning on DeCosey -- and Pepper, for that matter -- heavily. During a five-game stretch in January, he had played 198 of 200 minutes, participating in three straight games in which he never came off the floor.

"I'm just in a little slump," DeCosey said, "but I'm trying to work hard every day and doing whatever I can to get out of it."

DeCosey, like Dunphy, was asked about Temple's schedule, especially this murderer's row of five straight games against the Top 25.

"It's a tough schedule. It's a change coming from the A-10 to this conference," DeCosey said.

Temple was 5-5 before opening league play. The Owls are now 2-11 in the American and have dropped 13 of 15 games since closing 2013 at .500.

"After we got a couple of losses, we kind of got down on ourselves, started feeling sorry for ourselves," DeCosey said. "We stopped competing hard every night."

"During the SMU game, we kind of got that back, and we're trying to carry that over through the end of the season."

Temple has just five regular-season games remaining. The Owls visit No. 24 Memphis and No. 11 Louisville before returning home for games against Houston and UCF and finally finishing at USF.

The inaugural American Athletic Conference tournament tips off in Memphis on March 12.

The Owls currently find themselves tied for last place in the league with UCF. USF sits just barely ahead at 3-11.

All 10 conference teams make the tournament. And half of those might end end up going to the real tournament.

"It's been a tough road to hoe," Dunphy said, "but we've got more in store."

Temple basketball legend Hal Lear dies at 81

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Photo: Temple University

Temple basketball legend Hal Lear dies at 81

Temple University and Philadelphia basketball legend Hal Lear died on Saturday at the age of 81.

"The entire Temple University community mourns the loss of Hal Lear," Patrick Kraft, Temple's athletic director, said in a statement.

"Hal was an All-American on the court, and, with Guy Rodgers, part of the greatest backcourt in Philadelphia basketball history. More importantly, though, he was truly a great man, and beloved by all. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife Maggie and the entire Lear family at this time.”

Lear is one of four players to have his number retired by the university, as Temple retired his No. 6 in a ceremony on Jan. 30, 2013, at the Liacouras Center. He still holds the school's single-season record for most points scored — 745 set in 1955-56, his senior season, when he helped the Owls reach the Final Four for the first time in program history, and he's just one of three players in school history to average 20 or more points in two different seasons, with Mark Macon and Guy Rodgers being the others.

On May 7, 2013, Lear was elected into the Middle Atlantic Conference Hall of Fame.

He finished his Temple career scoring 1,472 points and averaging 19.0 points in 79 games, and is widely considered one of the best players to ever put on an Owls uniform.

The Philadelphia Warriors drafted Lear, a left-handed guard who starred at Overbrook High School, in the 1956 NBA draft. He played just three games in the NBA.

Lear is survived by wife, Maggie O’Keefe Lear, nine children, 21 grandchildren and one great grandchild.

“Hal Lear was not only one of the greatest players, but one of the greatest people in Temple basketball history,” Owls head coach Fran Dunphy said. “He personified class in every way, was a loving husband, father and grandfather. He is someone that will be remembered for his great feats on the court and how he handled himself with grace off it. A great man has left us."

Jerry Sandusky accuser asks to limit questioning, protect identity

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USA Today Images

Jerry Sandusky accuser asks to limit questioning, protect identity

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A man who claims he told Penn State football coach Joe Paterno in 1976 that he was sexually abused as a teen by Jerry Sandusky asked a judge Wednesday to protect his identity and limit questioning by lawyers in a lawsuit brought by Paterno's family against college sports' governing body.

Lawyers for the man called John Doe 150 said he gave a sworn deposition in October 2014 in a related case, brought by Penn State against its insurer over coverage for Sandusky-related claims, and that he should not have to endure another one.

He previously testified under oath about his abuse claims "and his reporting of the abuse to Coach Joseph Paterno and Penn State," his lawyers told Judge John Leete, who is presiding in the Paternos' lawsuit against the NCAA.

"Forcing John Doe 150 to sit through yet another deposition is not only duplicative, unnecessary and unduly burdensome, but it would force this victim of childhood sexual abuse to, again, relive the trauma of his abuse," his lawyers wrote. They said he settled with Penn State in 2013 and has kept his abuse a secret from those closest to him.

They alleged the abuse occurred when the man was a 14-year-old participant at a Penn State football camp but disclosed no other details.

Paterno, who died in 2012, said in an interview before his death that an assistant's report in 2001 of Sandusky attacking a boy in a team shower at the State College campus was the first he knew of such allegations against his longtime top assistant.

Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach, was convicted of 45 counts of child sexual abuse and is serving a sentence of 30 to 60 years in prison. He maintains his innocence and is pursuing an appeal.

John Doe 150's lawyer, Slade McLaughlin, said in a phone interview Wednesday that his client was concerned about "nuts" harassing him over his role in the scandal, which has generated strong feelings.

"Some of these people are really over the top and some of these people are militant, and some of these people, in my mind, are terrorists," McLaughlin said.

The filing comes two days after Penn State asked the judge to reject a subpoena from the NCAA in the Paterno family lawsuit, seeking the man's name and the identity of a Sandusky accuser who made a confidential settlement with the school over claims he was abused as a boy by Sandusky in 1971.

Penn State said neither settlement agreement contains specifics about either man's claims.

In May, the judge in the insurance dispute being litigated in Philadelphia said in a written opinion that there was a claim that Paterno was informed by a boy in 1976 that Sandusky had abused him. The school subsequently also confirmed it had settled over a 1971 allegation.

The judge has since decided to disclose more information about the two claims, details that are expected to be made public in about three weeks.

The Paternos are suing the NCAA, saying it used a Penn State-commissioned report that harmed their commercial interests. Two former Penn State coaches, Jay Paterno and Bill Kenney, are also suing the NCAA, saying the report made it impossible for them to find comparable work.

Jerry Sandusky granted hearing in appeal of sex abuse conviction

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The Associated Press

Jerry Sandusky granted hearing in appeal of sex abuse conviction

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A judge on Thursday ordered hearings to let former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky develop more information as he tries to overturn his child molestation conviction.

Judge John Cleland said the three days of proceedings in August will address, in part, whether defense lawyers should have called Sandusky to testify and whether prosecutors improperly leaked information about the grand jury investigation.

The hearing also will delve into whether prosecutor Joe McGettigan lied during closing arguments at Sandusky's 2012 trial when he said he did not know the identity of a figure referred to as Victim 2.

"The question is what Mr. McGettigan believed to be true when he made the statement to the jury," Cleland said.

Sandusky, 72, is serving a 30- to 60-year sentence for 45 counts of child sexual abuse covering 10 victims.

Eight young men testified they had suffered abuse at Sandusky's hands. The two others were Victim 2, who assistant coach Mike McQueary testified he saw being abused by Sandusky in team shower in 2001, and a boy who was reportedly seen by a custodian with Sandusky in the locker room.

Also at issue on appeal are decisions by Sandusky's lawyers to let him do an television interview with NBC's Bob Costas soon after his arrest, to waive his preliminary hearing and to not use grand jury testimony by three Penn State administrators.

A spokesman for the attorney general's office said prosecutors feel strongly that Sandusky's appeal is meritless and they plan to challenge the claims vigorously. A message seeking comment from Sandusky's appellate lawyer, Al Lindsay, was not immediately returned.

Cumberland County prosecutor Dave Freed, speaking for the state district attorneys' association, said complicated cases sometimes generate multi-day post-conviction appeals hearings.

"This order seems to me very much in keeping with the way Judge Cleland conducts business, which is he lays out very clearly what he expects, how he expects the hearing to go, allows sufficient time for it and allows the parties to prepare so he can use court time efficiently," Freed said.

Sandusky previously lost direct appeals to the state's Supreme and Superior courts. He is now pursuing claims under the state's Post-Conviction Relief Act, which is confined to newly discovered evidence, constitutional violations and ineffective lawyering.