Penn State abuse scandal costs approach a quarter-billion

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Penn State abuse scandal costs approach a quarter-billion

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Penn State's costs related to the Jerry Sandusky scandal are approaching a quarter-billion dollars and growing, five years after the former assistant football coach's arrest on child molestation charges.

The scandal's overall cost to the school has reached at least $237 million, including a recent $12 million verdict in the whistleblower and defamation case brought by former assistant coach Mike McQueary, whose testimony helped convict Sandusky in 2012.

The university has settled with 33 people over allegations they were sexually abused by Sandusky, and has made total payments to them of $93 million.

The total also covers the $48 million "fine" levied by the NCAA that is funding anti-child-abuse efforts in Pennsylvania, $27 million in lawyer fees to defend lawsuits, nearly $14 million that includes the legal defense of three former administrators facing criminal charges for their handling of Sandusky complaints and $5.3 million for crisis communications and other consultants.

The school's latest financial statement said insurers have covered $30 million in costs, while other insurance claims remain pending. Penn State says donations, student tuition, and taxpayer funds aren't being used to pay uninsured costs, including legal expenses. Instead, the school is relying on interest revenue from university loans.

The school also was hit in November with a $2.4 million fine from a federal investigation, started immediately after Sandusky was arrested, that concluded the university repeatedly violated campus crime reporting requirements.

A look at where some of the other pending Sandusky-related matters stand:

Administrators' criminal case
A senior judge sitting in Harrisburg is considering a request by three former high-ranking Penn State administrators to throw out their criminal charges, following an oral argument that was held in Harrisburg in October.

Former Penn State President Graham Spanier, former Athletic Director Tim Curley and former Vice President Gary Schultz are accused of not responding properly to McQueary's 2001 complaint that Sandusky was sexually abusing a boy in a team shower. They are also accused of putting children in danger.

The attorney general's office wants to add a new count, of conspiracy to commit endangering the welfare of children, against all three defendants. Judge John Boccabella has not indicated when he might rule.

The three men have consistently maintained their innocence.

Sandusky's appeal
Sandusky is serving a 30- to 60-year sentence in Greene State Prison on a 45-count conviction for sexual abuse of 10 boys, and he is currently pursuing an appeal in county court near State College.

In November, the judge handling that appeal -- Judge John Cleland, who was also the trial judge -- took himself off the case after Sandusky's lawyers raised objections to Cleland's role in a December 2011 meeting in a hotel the night before Sandusky waived a preliminary hearing.

Cleland's sternly worded order included a footnote saying his review of the 34 issues raised by Sandusky found none of them had merit.

The state court system is working on appointing a new judge, but that decision has not been made.

Spanier v. Penn State
Penn State countersued Spanier last month, saying he violated his employment agreement by not disclosing what he knew about Sandusky before Sandusky's 2011 arrest. The school is seeking repayment of millions of dollars it has paid him over the past five years.

Spanier's lawsuit claims the school violated an agreement made when he was pushed out of the top job -- days after Sandusky was charged -- by making public comments that were critical of him and not living up to promises regarding office space, teaching opportunities and payment of legal costs.

Spanier v. Freech
A judge has scheduled a hearing later this month in a lawsuit by Spanier against former FBI Director Louis Freeh and his law firm, who were paid by Penn State to produce a 2012 report into how Spanier and other top administrators handled the Sandusky matter.

Judge Robert Eby will hear oral argument in Freeh's preliminary objections to the lawsuit. Spanier is seeking damages for the reputational and economic harm he alleges resulted from the report.

Paterno v. NCAA
The family of former Penn State head coach Joe Paterno is suing the NCAA, saying it damaged the Paterno estate's commercial interests by relying on conclusions about Paterno in the Freeh report. Two former Paterno assistants, son Jay Paterno and Bill Kenney, are also suing, saying they have not been able to find comparable work because of the Freeh report. The most recent action in that case involved a dispute over subpoenas. Paterno died in 2012.

Penn sweeps season series from Cornell for 5th straight win

Penn sweeps season series from Cornell for 5th straight win

BOX SCORE

ITHICA, N.Y. – Ryan Betley scored 21 points, Darnell Foreman made two crucial free throws in the closing seconds, and Pennsylvania held on to beat Cornell 69-66 on Friday night.

Penn (12-12, 5-6 Ivy League) opened up a 43-31 lead with 17:45 to go, but Cornell erased the gap over the proceeding seven minutes, taking a 53-51 lead on a Matt Morgan jumper.

The two teams remained virtually deadlocked the rest of the way, neither side held an advantage greater than four. A Wil Bathurst 3-pointer for Cornell cut its deficit to 67-66 in the final seconds. But after a Bathurst foul, Foreman sank two at the line to push it to 69-66. Morgan had a last shot to tie, but missed.

AJ Brodeur scored 13 points for the Quakers, who shot 50 percent overall.

Morgan led all scorers with 26 for Cornell (7-19, 3-8). The Big Red shot only 39.3 percent, but held advantages is 3-point shooting, free-throw shooting, and rebounding.

Villanova seniors reflect as winningest class in school history

Villanova seniors reflect as winningest class in school history

Senior Day is always one of the most anticipated days on the college basketball calendar. Second-ranked Villanova will honor its seniors prior to Friday's game against No. 23 Creighton at the Pavilion.

This year's ceremony takes on added importance. Josh Hart, Kris Jenkins and Darryl Reynolds have won more games than any class in Villanova history -- 123 wins, to be exact, compared to just 16 losses. The Wildcat seniors have won more than 88 percent of their games over the last four years. 

They have a 61-9 career record against Big East opponents and have won four straight regular season conference championships. They also won the 2015 Big East Tournament and of course, the 2016 NCAA Tournament. 

The list of accomplishments goes on. These Villanova seniors have a 45-1 record at the Pavilion and finished with a perfect 16-0 record against Big 5 competition. They are the first four-year class in Big 5 history to go undefeated against their city rivals.

They've accomplished plenty individually as well. Hart is the front-runner for Big East Player of the Year honors and will likely be a first team All-American. Jenkins authored arguably the most famous shot in college basketball history, knocking down a buzzer-beating three-pointer to beat North Carolina in last season's championship game. Then there's Reynolds, who blossomed from little-used reserve to a key starter on this year's national championship contender.

The mood, rightfully, will be celebratory for Senior Day on Saturday. Villanova is 26-3 on the season and is closing in on a top seed in the NCAA Tournament. But the Wildcats will also set out to atone for Wednesday's loss to Butler, the first ever loss at the Pavilion for the seniors.

I sat down with Hart, Jenkins and Reynolds to discuss their journey to this point as well as what still lies ahead.

A shared bond
Most college basketball classes are tight. But the bond between the Villanova seniors runs especially deep. It's evident listening to each of them discuss their shared friendship.

"Our relationship has grown over the years," Jenkins said. "It's continuing to grow now. We're just around each other all the time, we understand each other, we have a genuine love and we really care for each other and I think that spills onto the court."

"I don't like either of them," Reynolds joked before reflecting on the relationship he shares with his classmates. "It was something we were blessed to have, something that clicked. We found that we all had similar upbringings in many ways, which is something that contributed to it. Our parents have always taught us to realize that you're going to be a part of something bigger than you and that's OK."

The relationship between Jenkins and Hart dates back to their time as high school standouts in the Washington, D.C. area. 

"Me and Kris, being from the 301 (area code) we knew each other," Hart said. "And Darryl fit in well with us. After I committed (to play at Villanova), I remember texting Darryl during Sunday worship, I wasn't supposed to have my phone. But I wanted to know what his decision was. And he was like, 'Yeah, I'm coming'. And one of the first things he said, not to sound corny, was, 'Let's do this, I want to win.' We started from there."

The legacy
If Reynolds' goal was to win, consider it a success. In addition to being the winningest class in school history, the Villanova seniors have won more games than any class in the long and storied history of the Big East conference.

"That's definitely an honor, definitely humbling," Hart said. "The Big East is one of the best conferences in the country, not just right now but tradition-wise. You've seen all the battles, and to have that (record) is definitely cool. Something we can't really hang our hats on right now. Obviously, we have the rest of this year to keep working towards. But if we take a step back and look at that, that's something that's a great accomplishment. It's more so the hard work and everything that we put in on a day-to-day basis, it's not just the games. It's coming in, getting your shots up, working in the weight room, getting your body right. It's not just the games and that's something that means the most to us, just the grind. It's great to have it pay off in that kind of way."

In addition to the conference championships and the national title, one particular accomplishment stands out: Entering Saturday's game against Creighton, this group has yet to lose two games in a row during its college career. The seniors have never experienced a losing streak; they always bounce back following a loss.

"We have great coaches and we have players that want to learn and want to get better and want to improve," Jenkins said. "So when we lose, we learn from that just as if we won. When we win a game, we go back and watch film and come back and get better the next day. We do the same thing when we lose, nothing changes."

That approach is part of a winning culture that Reynolds believes is the root for all of Villanova's success over the past four years.

"The thing that I'm most proud of is the culture here," Reynolds explained. "There's a million programs out there and there's a million ways of doing it. Everybody has a different idea of how to do it. There's so many different ways to look at this game and approach this game. The fact that with all of our success, we've never bailed out on our culture, never bailed out on what this program is all about. The fact that we've stuck to our core values throughout these years is the thing you have to be most proud of because a million things can be thrown at you. There's different trials and tribulations throughout the year. The fact you can stick to what you do and still be successful through that is a blessing in itself."

And while outsiders tend to focus on all the wins and the national championship, the players themselves find deeper meaning in the bonds they've developed.

"It's been a lot of fun. Obviously, we've had some very successful years here," Hart said. "Winning always makes things a little more fun. The national championship, that's something no one can take away from us. But the thing we value more than that national championship is the relationships. That's something we're going to take for the next 20, 30, 40 years. The (championship) rings, those can be lost, those can turn up missing. But the relationships are what we really take pride in, that's something we're always going to have."

A Villanova senior
Rarely does Hart give an interview without mentioning the role of the Villanova seniors. Following games, he's quick to point out what the seniors did well, or in most cases what they could have done better.

"Your role (as a senior) isn't to be the leading scorer or the one that's always going to get to play," he said. "It's to make sure you teach the younger guys how to be a Villanova basketball player, how to be men, how to grow up and be successful in this program. That's day by day -- you bring it in practice, you bring it every game and they see that and say 'OK, this is what a Villanova senior is supposed to be like, this is someone who is not going to break no matter what adversity he faces.' That's something we want to pass down to the younger guys." 

Seniors have become a dying breed in big time college basketball. But not at Villanova, where four-year players are the backbone of Wright's program. Reynolds best sums up the unique mindset of a Villanova senior. 

"A Villanova senior is all about everything but himself," he said. "You hear about so many times guys become seniors in different places and they focus on themselves and their next step. Your job as a senior here is to make sure everyone else is OK, that this culture is staying alive. That this team is where it needs to be, that you and coach are on the same page. So it honestly is a role of selflessness in its purest form."

Jenkins expands on the importance of the leadership provided by the senior class.

"We all take a great deal of pride in it because when you get to this point a lot is expected of you," he said. "These younger guys look up to you, they believe in you. And the guys that were seniors before us set the standard real high and they expect nothing less. So we owe it to not only those guys but the younger guys and to ourselves to give it our best shot and make sure we continue to hold this program up high and be great Villanova seniors."

Finishing strong
The goal from here on out would appear to be obvious -- defending last year's national championship. It's a task this group realizes but doesn't emphasize. They prefer to stick with the mentality that has served them so well to this point.

"We're anxious to get to this last little stretch," Reynolds said. "As scared as we are of it, because we realize this our last stretch, we'll just approach it like we always have. Focus on what is at hand at the moment and over time it builds and builds and builds. We'll look up and hopefully it will be a month and some change later and we'll be where we want to be as a Villanova basketball team."

"We owe it to each other to finish this year out the right way," Hart said. "That might not be winning it all, but that's making sure we're all on the same page, making sure we're giving it up for each other. We're not going to judge this season on the last month. We're going to make sure we're the best Villanova basketball team at the end of the year and that's something we're going to judge ourselves on. 

"If we don't make it all the way but play the best we can, play the Villanova basketball way, we'll be able to look each other in the eye in the locker room. Obviously, we'll be sad, probably be some tears being shed, but we'll be able to look each other in the eye knowing we gave it up for each other. I think that's the biggest thing and the best feeling -- that we battled to the last second for our brothers."