Penn to Install Video Boards at the Palestra, We Brainstorm Further Ideas for Modernization

Penn to Install Video Boards at the Palestra, We Brainstorm Further Ideas for Modernization

Miss something? See it on replay! Finally...

The University of Pennsylvania announced Monday that its famed Palestra would soon be joining the 21st century thanks to a partnership with ANC Sports Enterprises and the addition of two new "Mitsubishi Electric Diamond Vision" video boards. According to the University's press release, the new displays will replace the conventional scoreboards mounted on the walls behind each basket.

Thankfully, for those of you worried that the technological advancements might in some way diminish or cheapen the Palestra's famed look, the University has ensured that the update will do its best to preserve "the traditional atmosphere of the venue." Via UPenn Athletic Director Steve Bilsky:

"We are being extremely careful to enhance the game-day environment while not disturbing the integirty of The Palestra, including using technology that is capable of creating a nostalgic feel."

For reference, the boards are described as similar to that of the out-of-town scoreboard at Safeco Field in Seattle. Per the release:

"ANC's unique VisionSOFTTM operating system will enable the displays to mimic the look of the current fixed digit scoreboards, feature in-depth statistical analysis, or dissolve into full-motion video of memorable events which make up The Palestra's storied history. The patented software is also capable of creating the appeal of an old manually turned scoreboard, a unique feature which enabled the Seattle Mariners' out-of-town scoreboard to be named the best in Major League Baseball by ESPN.com."

It really is about time for this sort of addition. Even though it can fun to sit there like a snob and laugh at the people who missed something because they weren't paying attention, there are countless other times when you just want see it again for yourself. Bravo to the University for finding a way to update the Cathedral without compromising its character.

Speaking of which, is there any chance you guys at Penn might want to continue down this path and make a few more not-so-great leaps forward? The
$2-million dollar remodeling project known as "Palestra 2000" did
little to solve any of the building's actual issues, opting instead to
play on the its history by turning the concourse walls into a
mini-museum. As an odd yet semi-relevant aside, doesn't literally everything once-slapped with the suffix "2000" seem outrageously dated now only eleven years later?

For our own pet project—"Palestra 2011"—accepting debit and credit cards seems like a good start. I mean really, if you can figure out the wiring for a 24-foot video board, we shouldn't be totally screwed if we're cash-less. Moreover, while standing in line to pee in the janitor's sink has a certain charm the first few times, it's really just not cool anymore.

Obviously, we realize the building has structural issues that really can't be rectified (there really isn't room for additional bathrooms and the width of the corridors are stuck as they are). I personally should also clarify before I'm criticized as lacking a certain local pride—I love the place. There's absolutely nowhere I'd rather watch a basketball game. Still, as patrons of the arena, lovers of basketball and fans of the Big 5, we all have our hopes for the place moving forward.

If you could change one thing about the Palestra (obviously within reason, given the practical limitations), what would it be?

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout sure does win a lot when the Eagless beat the Cowboys.

Not only did the Los Angeles Angels outfielder get a touchdown ball from Carson Wentz during the Eagles win over the Cowboys to cap off the season, but he also won a bet on the game with a friend.

Turns out, Wentz had some sort of bet with DJ Cottrell, whose Twitter profile says he is from Trout's hometown of Millville, NJ. Cottrell is likely a Cowboys fan and came up on the losing end.

"The fact I have to wear an entire Eagles uniform to the gym for a week is going to be the death of me," he Tweeted on Tuesday.

Then he posted a photo of himself in the ridiculous football uniform while posing alongside Trout.

It's good to be Mike Trout. Not so much a Dallas Cowboys fan these days.

[via Cut4]

 

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”