Report: Temple ''Wants In" the Big East

Report: Temple ''Wants In" the Big East

As reported by the Daily News' Mike Kern earlier this morning, Temple University has made clear to conference officials its interest in potentially joining the Big East. Kern's report indicates that Temple's No. 1 preference would be to join as an all-sports member, but that the university might well be willing to settle for a football-only invitation.

And so, rather than sitting back and playing the waiting game, it seems Temple has gone out made its own intentions known. While the story has a "big feel" about it based on the barrage of media coverage surrounding the move over the past few weeks, it's nothing to get radically excited about just yet.

When it comes to Temple football possibly rejoining its former conference, clearly the Big East is a step up from the MAC, but its hard to say just how much of a step it really is, or will be. After all, the renewed interest between Temple and the Big East is largely motivated by the fact that the conference is hemorrhaging programs and needs new schools to hopefully stop further bleeding.

Though it is a BCS conference, its generally considered a step below the Big 10, SEC, PAC(whatever it is now, I don't know)-74, what for the time-being is still the Big-12 and now perhaps even the new ACC. On top of everything else, there's been rumors of the Big East potentially partnering up with remnants of the Big-12, assuming Texas and Oklahoma are on their way out, to possibly create a pseduo-super-conference of its own.

So, yeah, it is a step up from the MAC, but it remains to see just far of a step. In this case, there is an equal fear of becoming the next TCU and being the school burnt by inaction.

As for basketball, assuming the school could be admitted as full-member, its hard not to love the move for the Owls—assuming the conference can stay together for round ball. Let's approach this from the perspective of a best case scenario, since the worst case is evidently a wholesale dissolution of the current programs.

A program that has quickly regained some of the national traction lost under the final years of John Chaney, Temple would figure to inherit the "Big East" recruiting bump that Villanova has so enjoyed these past few years. Though the loss of Syracuse and Pitt have shifted the balance of power to the ACC, the Big East remains one of the premiere basketball conferences in the country.

For a Temple team that is "very good" and looking to become "great," the move could do wonders. One need look most recently to the Daniel Ochefu snafu to see evidence of what Temple has lost and could gain. Ochefu, a 6-9 center from Westtown, PA, was recruited heavily by Temple, but ultimately chose Villanova and a college career in Big East basketball. Leveling the playing field would make a great judge of talent like Fran Dunphy even more effective in landing desired recruits. Add to that membership in the Big East, home games in the Liacouras Center and a brand new multi-million dollar practice facility, and Temple starts looking like a real good destination for a kid to play his college ball—and just as good as, say, Villanova.

If you're a fan of Temple or 'Nova or just particularly interested in the future viability of the Big East, then keep an eye on the UCONN Huskies. UCONN has stayed relatively quiet nationally when it comes to its prospective future in the Big East, and its president has repeatedly indicated a desire toward protecting the stature of the school's current conference. The quality of that conference over the next few years could lie in whether the Huskies stay the course and remain loyal to their current commitment, or jump ship like near-identical athletic institutions Pitt and Syracuse.

Still, as was said up front, there is nothing to get excited about just yet. Temple is the one indicating its interest in the Big East; it is not the other way around...for now.

The Big East could use a school like Temple add some new blood and hopefully reassure its existing programs—specifically, UCONN—that times will be good after all. Because, right now, for all but a few top schools in the Big East and Big-12, it's hard not to get that "we were dead before the ship even sank" kind of feeling.

Watch: Eagles fan wearing Donald Trump mask gets roll thrown at him

Watch: Eagles fan wearing Donald Trump mask gets roll thrown at him

Philadelphia sports fans have a storied history of throwing things.

They threw snowballs at Santa Claus back in 1968 and bracelets onto the ice at the Wells Fargo Center during a Flyers home playoff game last April.

On Sunday, one fan took that long-standing reputation to new heights.

At a tailgate outside the Linc leading up to the Eagles-Steelers game, a dancing Birds fan wearing a Donald Trump mask had an Amoroso roll thrown at his face.

(h/t Deadspin)

Instant Replay: Mets 17, Phillies 0

usa-jay-bruce-mets-phillies.jpg
USA Today Images

Instant Replay: Mets 17, Phillies 0

BOX SCORE

NEW YORK — This time, there was no lead for the Phillies’ bullpen to blow.

Sunday, the Mets tagged five Phillies relievers for 14 runs in a 17-0 demolition and won the four-game series. 

The Phillies only recorded three hits against Robert Gsellman, a rookie righthanded starter who stands to play a large role in the Mets’ injury-ravaged rotation down the stretch.

The Mets — for now — regained control of the first wild card spot in the NL. They had entered Sunday tied in the standings with the Giants. The Giants’ game against the Padres had no score when the Mets’ game concluded. The Cardinals sit a half-game back of both teams. Their game against the Cubs does not begin until 8:08 p.

The Phillies fell to 70-86.

Players from the Mets and Phillies both poured out of the dugouts for a pregame moment of silence in honor of Marlins ace Jose Fernandez, who died early Sunday morning in a boating accident at the age of 24.

Starting pitching report
Jake Thompson showed life on his changeup, a pitch he has struggled to wield effectively since his August arrival in the majors. He ran into trouble in the second inning when he surrendered a double to Jay Bruce on a middle-in fastball and a single to T.J. Rivera, but escaped with only one run in damage after inducing James Loney into an easy double play.

He nearly imploded in the fourth, surrendering a solo homer to Curtis Granderson to lead off the inning and then walking Jose Reyes with the bases loaded and two out to force in a run. Thompson elicited a popout to left from Asdrubal Cabrera to end the bases-loaded scenario, but that was the end of his afternoon.

Gsellman erased the rough memories of his first major league start, a 5-1 defeat to the Phillies at Citi Field on Aug. 28 in which he surrendered four runs on five hits and was pulled in the seventh inning.

He struck out eight batters in seven shutout innings. Gsellman only ran into trouble in the first inning when he faced a runners-on-the-corners, two-out situation in the top of the first. He promptly got Ryan Howard to ground out to first base.

Gsellman even managed to reach base with a bunt single in the third despite not being able to swing a bat due to a labrum tear in his non-throwing shoulder.

Bullpen report
Phil Klein made his first appearance since being called up for the second time on Sept. 10. He had been dealing with elbow soreness. Klein only retired one batter in the fifth and surrendered two runs on two walks, two singles and a pitch that hit Rene Rivera in the left hand. He departed with the bases still loaded.

Colton Murray entered to clean up the mess in the fifth and allowed an inherited runner to score on a wild pitch. He added a scoreless sixth but loaded the bases with one out in the seventh and got pulled.

Frank Herrmann inherited the bases-loaded situation and promptly walked the first batter he faced, Jose Reyes, to force in a run. It was all downhill from there, as Asdrubal Cabrera took him deep to right for a grand slam.

Patrick Schuster gave up four runs in the eighth on a Jose Reyes double with the bases loaded and a two-run single by Eric Campbell.

Luis Garcia allowed two runners to score in the eighth on a Michael Conforto double, one of which was assigned to Schuster.

At the plate
Cesar Hernandez’s 29-game streak of reaching base safely came to an end.

Freddy Galvis was the only Phillies player to advance past second base, singling in the first and then advancing on a wild pitch and steal of third. He was stranded by Howard’s grandout.

In the field
Hernandez and Freddy Galvis turned a 4-6-3 double play in the second inning in a runners-on-the-corners, no out situation.

Health check
Tyler Goeddel did not play as he recuperates from his concussion. Relievers Luis Garcia and Severino Gonzalez were unavailable last night due to ankle issues. Garcia pitched the end of the eighth in mop-up duty.

Up next
The Phillies will have a day off before they start their final homestand of the season against the Braves on Tuesday. Jerad Eickhoff (11-14, 3.75 ERA) will start for the Phillies. He has a 1.75 ERA against Atlanta in four starts against them this season.

The Braves’ scheduled starter has yet to be determined and their game against the Marlins scheduled for Sunday was cancelled once news emerged of Fernandez’s death.

Find great deals on Philadelphia Phillies tickets with TicketIQ. Buy cheap Phillies tickets with no hidden fees for all games on their 2016 schedule.