NCAA

Sandusky notifies trial court he plans to appeal

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Sandusky notifies trial court he plans to appeal

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Jerry Sandusky's attorneys have notified his trial judge that he wants a state appeals court to overturn his convictions for molesting boys.

Attorneys for the former Penn State assistant football coach filed a pair of appeal notices Thursday that indicate Sandusky wants the state Superior Court to take up his convictions on 45 counts of child sexual abuse. The notices were filed in the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte, the site of his three-week trial last summer.

Also Thursday, Penn State outlined in a new court filing why it thinks a defamation and whistleblower lawsuit filed by a former football assistant coach who reported Sandusky in 2001 lacks merit and should be dismissed.

The university filed a 33-page document that fleshed out its response to Mike McQueary's civil suit over how he was treated after reporting that he saw the former defensive coordinator showering with a boy.

In the Sandusky criminal case, the new defense filing comes a month after the trial judge rejected their post-sentencing motions, including an argument that his attorneys lacked sufficient time to prepare for trial.

Judge John Cleland also rejected motions regarding jury instructions, hearsay testimony and a comment by the prosecution during closing arguments that referred to the fact that Sandusky, who did not testify at trial, gave media interviews after he was arrested in November 2011.

In the appeals notices, Sandusky's defense attorneys did not elaborate on the issues he plans to raise on appeal. But lead appellate counsel Norris Gelman said he would make many of the same arguments that Cleland rejected in January.

"The publicity has been bad," Gelman said Thursday. "All we can do is hope that it will not affect or infect the judges of the Superior Court."

He said the likely next step will be for Cleland to order Sandusky's lawyers to file a document that lists their intended claims. After that, Cleland would write an opinion about the case and certify the trial record to Superior Court. Gelman would then get two or three months to file a brief to the appeals court.

The attorney general's office had no immediate comment on the notices.

In the McQueary lawsuit, Penn State's new filing argued that statements in late 2011 by Spanier in support of former administrators Tim Curley and Gary Schultz did not suggest McQueary was lying. McQueary is suing for millions of dollars, alleging Spanier made him a scapegoat.

"This daunting analytical leap is illogical and insufficient as a matter of law," wrote Penn State attorney Nancy Conrad. She said "no fair, cogent reading of the statements suggests that Spanier was making statements by innuendo about (McQueary) that he knew were false or with reckless disregard for their falsity."

Conrad declined an interview request, and a message left for McQueary's lawyer Elliot Strokoff was not immediately returned.

Sandusky, 69, is serving a 30- to 60-year state prison sentence for the sexual abuse of 10 boys, including violent attacks inside Penn State athletics facilities. He maintains his innocence.

Michael Vick facing growing outcry against planned induction into Virginia Tech HOF

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AP Images

Michael Vick facing growing outcry against planned induction into Virginia Tech HOF

BLACKSBURG, Va. -- Public opposition is growing against the planned induction of former football star Michael Vick into the Virginia Tech Sports Hall of Fame.

The Roanoke Times reported Tuesday that two online petitions at change.org had received more than 90,000 combined signatures against the September induction. The Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine has also announced its opposition.

The university in Blacksburg has continued to defend its recent decision, noting that some believe Vick is the greatest athlete in school history.

Vick served 19 months in federal prison on 2007 dogfighting convictions. He was a top contender for the 1999 Heisman Trophy after leading the Hokies through an undefeated regular season and to a spot in the national championship game. He went on to play professionally for the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles.

Doug Overton pleads guilty to disorderly conduct in indecent exposure case

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The Associated Press

Doug Overton pleads guilty to disorderly conduct in indecent exposure case

Former 76er and La Salle basketball star Doug Overton pleaded guilty to three counts of disorderly conduct Wednesday, stemming from an April 30 incident on the Cynwyd Heritage Trail.

Overton, 47, was arrested for exposing himself to both men and women while on the trail in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, on April 30, per the police.

Overton, the head basketball coach at Divison II Lincoln University, was sentenced to one year of probation and ordered to participate in a psycho-sexual evaluation.

As part of a plea deal, three counts of indecent exposure were dropped. 

“He admitted on the record that his behavior was offensive and obscene, it was obscene behavior and that other people that were there in the park that day enjoying a public area with their families, that they observed that and it was offensive and obscene to them,” Assistant District Attorney Brianna Ringwood told the Main Line Times. “He admitted to engaging in behavior that was obscene and offensive.”

The Big 5 Hall of Famer played 11 NBA seasons, including parts of three with the Sixers.