So Officially Begins the New Era in Penn State Football

So Officially Begins the New Era in Penn State Football

By now you have heard about how Penn State is turning the page to a new chapter in their football history this weekend. That could not be farther from the truth. Penn State is starting a brand new book altogether when it hosts Ohio on Saturday (12 p.m. / ESPN).

You do not need me, or anyone else, to remind you just how much has changed at Penn State, but I will do it anyway. Former New England Patriots offensive coordinator Bill O’Brien steps in to the middle of one of the biggest reconstruction projects of all-time, following in the footsteps of a fallen icon in Joe Paterno as the program receives a massive punch to the gut in the form of crippling NCAA sanctions – a four year postseason ban, massive reduction in scholarships and a $60 million fine – and the entire university and community continues to search for answers amid a lack of responsible leadership.

The NCAA has granted free transfers to any Penn State player choosing to leave, and some have taken that rare opportunity, including running back Silas Redd (USC), wide receiver Justin Brown (Oklahoma), linebacker Khairi Fortt (Cal) and kicker Anthony Fera (Texas). A few others have left the program, including some recruits, which was to be expected, and O’Brien will have a tough job ahead of him to keep more players from leaving in the off season.

Yes, it is a brand new era for Penn State football. They even have names on the jerseys now. But Saturday afternoon will serve a larger purpose for many. It will be an opportunity for the community and fans to come together and get a release from the real life issues that loom larger than football. While the conduct and statements of some in the Penn State community appear to do more harm than good, everybody at this point deserves a couple hours to have nothing more to worry about than a football game, even if that does play in to the culture argument that has been widely discussed.

So, what can we expect from Penn State as it opens the 2012 season? That’s an excellent question, because it’s nearly impossible to answer at this point.

The defense should be in solid condition, with Marple Newtown’s Pete Massaro back from another ACL injury and looking to see some time on the defensive line. As expected from Penn State, the linebackers will also be in good form, with last year’s three starters back for another fall, including Michael Mauti. Mauti is also coming back from an ACL injury, but he has worked hard to be ready to go this season and his senior leadership will be vital for keeping this team together. Mauti will be joined by Glenn Carson and Gerald Hodges, who turned down a chance to enter the NFL Draft to come back for his senior season.

The name fans around the Big Ten will likely get to know from Penn State’s defense will be defensive tackle Jordan Hill, who looks to follow in the footsteps of Devon Still and Jared Odrick. Hill is a monster in the trenches but will be in for a tough test against Ohio’s offensive line, who does as good a job protecting quarterback Tyler Tettleton as any line in the country (well, except for Alabama, perhaps). The success of the front seven will be key because Penn State must replace all four starters in the secondary. Sophomore Adrian Amos looks to be the young player to watch this season, as he can move from defensive back to safety if needed. 

The concerns are clearly on the offense. Matt McGloin is far from Tom Brady, although he has joked otherwise, and with a new crop of wideouts looking to replace the three leading receivers from last season (Derek Moye graduated, Brown transferred and Devon Smith was cut and transferred to Marshal), who knows what to expect from the passing game. Further complicating things could be the fact that McGloin and everyone on the offense will be looking to pick up a new style. Of course, with new players stepping in to the receiving game perhaps the offensive philosophy change may not be as much a detriment as it could for most teams. Allen Robinson, Shawney Kersey and Alex Kenney will be some of the names to watch step in to the receiver spots.

With Silas Redd moving to the west coast, O’Brien is not being shy about hyping up sophomore Bill Belton, who was used as a wildcat option late last season under interim head coach Tom Bradley. O’Brien quickly made sure he was moved to running back and was prepping him to back-up Redd. Now O’Brien says Belton is a guy he can count on for a good number of carries each week.

O’Brien is breathing new life into the Penn State football program in more ways than one, but now he needs to find a way to win some football games. Or at the very least, prove he knows how to be a head coach. Success for Penn State now will not be measured in wins and losses on the field, but how the team sticks together on and off the field.

Whatever lies ahead for O’Brien and Penn State, it begins Saturday afternoon at noon, against the Ohio Bobcats.

Follow Kevin’s college football coverage on Twitter @KevinOnCFB.

Union-Toronto FC 5 things: Embracing the playoff underdog role

Union-Toronto FC 5 things: Embracing the playoff underdog role

Union vs. Toronto FC
7:30 p.m. on ESPN2

Riding a seven-game winless run entering their first playoff match since 2011, the No. 6 Union (11-14-9) will attempt to hit the reset button and unseat the third-ranked and heavily favored Toronto FC (14-9-11) on Wednesday (7:30 p.m., ESPN2) at BMO Field.

Here are five things to know:

1. Playing underdog
The struggling Union are happily accepting the role as underdogs against MLS Cup-hungry Toronto FC.

"It's a difficult task but it’s not impossible,” Union manager Jim Curtin said. "Not many people are giving us a chance. We've been a good team when we're considered the underdog and my guys have responded well in that situation. This is no different."

To fully embrace that underdog role, and in an attempt to wash away the stink of how they ended the regular season, the Union are treating Wednesday as a hard reset. For them, the playoffs will be a fresh chance to prove themselves.

“It’s a new season now,” said Union center back Ken Tribbett, who helped his club draw Toronto FC at BMO Field on Sept. 24. “In the playoffs, anything can happen. We go up to Toronto and it’ll be a good test. We have to stay sharp for 90 minutes and hopefully we can come back here with a win.”

And there is a reason to be slightly optimistic about the Union’s chance. Despite a 1-0-1 record against the Canadian side this season, the Union, who lost 3-1 in the first match, played much better on Sept. 24 at BMO Field. They clogged the midfield and ground the Sebastian Giovinco-less club into a 1-1 draw.

“It’s encouraging that we have gone there recently and played well,” Curtin said. “I think we have a group that has a belief, and one that is pissed a bit about how things have ended. They are motivated.”

2. Leaning on experience
While the 2016 Union will ultimately be known for their reliance on youth — a group that included Keegan Rosenberry, who has played every minute this season, Fabian Herbers, Josh Yaro and Ken Tribbett — it’s the veterans that will lead them on Wednesday.

“This is a pressure game for everybody,” Curtin said. “We have a good balance of guys who have played in big spots, like (Chris) Pontius, Tranquillo (Barnetta), (Alejandro) Bedoya. (C.J.) Sapong has played in big games, you can go through the list.”

Yet despite Curtin’s need for his veterans to lead, his reliance on youth means the younger players need to be reliable. The manager admitted that pressure can change how people play, and he is making sure the Union youth movement remains steady on Wednesday.

“We have young guys, there’s no question about it,” Curtin said. “These guys will play in their first playoff game and a lot of the guys on our roster have never been in a playoff game. You hope they rise to the occasion and I’m confident they will.”

3. Pressure on Toronto
Making their second-ever postseason appearance, high-priced Toronto FC has its sights set on bigger things than the Union in the play-in playoff round. That’s why Curtin believes the pressure is squarely on his opposition.

“I’d say the pressure is on them, they are the home team,” the manager said. “My guys should be loose, they have nothing to lose. It’s fair to say, they are the home team and they want to make a deep playoff run. We want to make some noise.”

Toronto FC coach Greg Vanney knows his team will be excited, so he’s trying to instill a high intensity but controlled start for his club.

“We expect a little of the unexpected at the start,” he said. “The game settles down eventually, but at the start, there’s a lot of emotion into it and you want to play with the right kind of caution but the right kind of intensity to put the opposing team on their back foot.

“The guys are ready to go, ready to go after Philadelphia.”

4. Keep an eye on
Jozy Altidore: It would be easy to go with Giovinco here, but Altidore has a recent history of crushing the Union. He has two goals in his last three games against the Union and buried 10 in 23 games this season.

“Jozy is a guy who can stretch the field and is dangerous,” Curtin said. “He’s not a guy you can shut down, it’s not possible. He’ll have his moments, you just have to make those looks as predictable for (goalkeeper Andre Blake) as you can. You hope he’s a little off on the night.”

Tranquillo Barnetta: Without added inspiration, the Union offensive catalyst has been one of the club’s best players all season. On Wednesday, Curtin expects a little extra from Barnetta, who is not returning to the Union in 2017.

“I’ve talked a ton about how special he is, he’s been a great attribute for the Union and a guy we want to prolong the season for,” Curtin said. “He’s played in the big spots, the big games and there’s something extra there for him.” 

5. This and that
• On the injury front, Union center back Yaro sprained his MCL while returning from a concussion. “It’s a two-week injury,” Curtin said, “so it will be unfortunate he won’t be part of the Toronto game.”

Warren Creavalle is also fighting injury. The defensive midfielder left Sunday’s match with a rib injury but could be available for Wednesday. “It’s painful for him,” Curtin said. “He’s a tough kid and he wants to be a part of this game.”

• The Union and Toronto FC are deadlocked all time, with a 6-6-5 record against each other. 

• The Union are 2-4-3 at BMO Field.

• Both clubs enter Wednesday limping. Since August 27 (the Union’s last win), Toronto FC is 2-1-4, while the Union are 0-5-2.

NFC East Week 7 Recap: Enter Dallas Week

NFC East Week 7 Recap: Enter Dallas Week

The Giants beat the sleeping Rams, Washington replicated the Eagles in Detroit, and the Cowboys former QB showed off his soon-to-be-former house. Here’s a look at what happened during Week 7 in the NFC East:

New York Giants

What Happened: The Giants took part in the NFL’s weekly crime against America; a football game in London. In the Battle of Bad Facial Hair, Brian McAdoo’s squad snuck away with a 17-10 lead over Jeff Fisher’s Los Angeles Rams, and it was about as impressive as a new season of “The Simpsons.” (It’s an accomplishment, I won’t argue that, but let’s not make it out to be some sort of minor miracle).

The Giants fell into an early 10-0 hole, but scored 17 straight over the last three quarters in a game about as exciting as The American Crossword Puzzle Tournament. The hero for New York was safety Landon Collins, who had two interceptions. One went for a touchdown that tied the game at 10 (and is, admittedly, much more fun to watch in German), while the other came with just over 12-minutes remaining, which would put Big Blue in position for the game-winning touchdown.

The Giants offense did little to build confidence in McAdoo’s system, however. Victor Cruz had some drops, Odell Beckham didn’t do enough to warrant some silly antic with the kicking net, and Eli Manning biggest impact was by acting as Donald Trump’s best surrogate. Look out, Kellyanne Conway, Eli’s got you on the hot seat!

Meanwhile, at the fear of sounding too #MAGA, the games in the U.K. really aren’t fair to the fans here in the Colonies. Every season, numerous teams (and fans) are sacrificing a home game to help “grow the game globally,” a.k.a. “Try to find new ways to make the owners money.” One of these years, it’s gonna be the Birds who are going to play a “home game” at Twickenham or Piccadilly or Mary Poppin’s Field rather than the Linc, and that’s gonna be some bull. How it is fair that one team loses home field advantage while another gets a game at a neutral field? When the NFL calls for a referendum on this Brexit, you can bet I’m voting STAY. #Topical.

On a serious note, the mother of cornerback Eli Apple, Annie Apple, took Giants owner John Mara to task for his nonchalant response to kicker Josh Brown’s domestic abuse case.  Considering I’m terrified to even sneeze too harshly around my boss, the fact that Apple would go public with her feelings at the risk of her son’s employment is in itself brave. Her experience as a victim of domestic abuse, and how she’s overcome it, is truly heroic. Definitely worth a read. 

What It Means: For the first time this season, the Giants followed the script they drew up over the offseason. The defensive front-four put pressure on the QB, which translated into turnovers. The offense spread the ball around (Cruz, OBJ, and rookie Sterling Shepard each had five catches a piece). And the Giants, despite falling into an early hole, stuck tough and walked out with a victory on the “road.” That takes #GUTS.

<Insert sarcastic applause here>

While the optimists in New York may take this as a sign their team is coming together, the more likely explanation is that the team from Los Angeles was suffering from being EIGHT HOURS BEHIND THEIR NATURAL TIME ZONE. Kickoff was at 6:30 A.M. Los Angeles Time. Instead of uniforms, the Rams should have been given pajama onesies.

And while some in New York would like to paint Collins as the NEXT GREAT GIANTS DEFENDER, let’s not act like this isn’t anything more than a testament against Rams quarterback Case Keenum.  Both picks came off tips, for the record, and floated so high that even the Eagles wide receivers wouldn’t have dropped them. Keenum had two other INTs to former Iggle Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, and we all know he’s not bound for Canton.

What’s Next: Once again, an NFC East rival will get a bye week before facing the Birds. That’ll be followed up by games against the Bengals, Bears, and Browns, so it’s incredibly conceivable Eli & Co. have a bit of a winning streak ahead of them.



What Happened: Remember when the Iggles choked the game away to Detroit in Week 5? Well Matt Stafford and Co. came to return the favor. The Lions had an impressive two-minute drive that cullminated in an 18-yard touchdown pass to Anquan Boldin with 16-seconds remaining, handing Washington a 20-17 defeat.

The story was almost Kirk Cousins, who led Washington on a game-altering nine-play touchdown drive just moments before to take the lead. Had Washington held on, Cousins the Comeback Kid would have been the focus, and not the number of erratic overthrows, or the lost fumble in the 3rd quarter, or the near-interception in the 2nd quarter, or the near interception in the 4th quarter, either. No, the story would have been Cousins, and the high-level of football he provided for an amazing one quarter on Sunday. Thankfully, the YOU LIKE THAT vine’s were left in the draft folder.

The Goat for D.C. was running back Matt Jones, who makes Ryan Matthews seem as secure as Al Gore’s lockbox. Jones had two fumbles in the first quarter alone, losing one in the Lion’s endzone on a drive that should have at least netted Washington three points. Then, for good measure, Jones fumbled in Lions territory deep into the third. That’s probably the last we’ll see of Jones for a while; trust is hard.

Meanwhile, Jamison Crowder is everything Iggles fans want Josh Huff to be, and he’ll likely be the reason DeSean Jackson’s D.C. home will be up for sale this summer.

What It Means: Jay Gruden’s team can leave Detroit with the same mindset Doug Pederson’s did; they can convince themselves they were the better team, that they shot themselves in the foot, and that on a more fundamentally-sound Sunday, they come away with the victory.

Sure, if Josh Norman wasn’t out with a concussion, maybe they don’t give up the final score. Maybe if Jones didn’t spend the afternoon doing an early-career Tiki Barber impression, this whole day would be different. Maybe if Blockbuster had started live-streaming in 2006, they’d still be in business. Maybe, maybe, maybe.

This team followed an 0-2 start with a four-game winning streak. This Washington squad is as confusing as trying to figure out how to turn the lights on in a hotel room. Is it the switches on the walls or the knobs under the shades? WHICH ONE IS IT!? 

Also, Washington LT Trent Williams hurt his left knee, though all indications are it isn’t significant. That being said, Williams is arguably the team’s offensive MVP, and an extended absence would hurt this squad bigly.

What’s Next: Washington gets a “home” game against Cincinnati in London next week, which as previously mentioned, is as fair as a carnival game. They’ll follow that up with games against the Vikings, Packers, Cowboys, and Cardinals, a month-long stretch that should shine some clarity on the type of team this is. 


Dallas Cowboys

What Happened: The Dallas Cowboys were on a bye this past weekend, which means an overload of hot takes on what the team should do when Tony Romo comes back. Also, fun stories about what the Cowboys players did on their week off. Here’s some photos of the house Romo is gonna sell when he’s cut and signed by the Bears next season. Neat!

Also, Dez Bryant looks like he’s ready to play this week, which is frightening considering the Birds total lack of depth at cornerback.  Maybe he’ll throw a temper-tantrum about something mundane and get ejected. Or maybe he’ll just throw a temper-tantrum. Probably just the latter.

Honestly, an NFL weekend without the Cowboys is like a Star Wars movie without Darth Vader (or, for us more recent nerds, a GoT without Cersei). We want the villain. We NEED the villain. Just so long as that villain is defeated in the most soul-crushing, gut-wrenching, humiliating way possible. We’re not savages, after all.

So let’s reverse the order a bit here now, and skip too….

What’s Next: EAGLES!! In case you hadn’t heard, the 5-1 Dallas Cowboys play host to the 4-2 Philadelphia Eagles in a game that will shape the course and destiny of the NFC East for approximately six days, depending on what Washington does that morning.

What It Means: Everything! If the Cowboys deliver another convincing victory -- or any sort of victory, that is -- they has righteous claim not just to Best-Team-in-the-Division, but Best-Team-in-the-Conference, and local beat bloggers will start counting the games necessary to clinch home field advantage.

On the flip side, if the Eagles come away with a road upset -- and it would be an upset, mind you -- they have righteous claim to Best-Team-in-the-Division, despite being humiliated by Washington just fourteen days prior. Plus, bloggers like myself will be able to fire up our favorite “What’s More Overrated: the Dallas Cowboys or ‘The Walking Dead’” Hot Takes. Dak Prescott vs. Rick Grimes, what suspense!!

Unfortunately, this game is on paper WAY more important for the Eagles than it is for ‘dem Boys. A loss drops the Birds two games behind the divisional lead (not to mention 0-2 vs. the NFC East), and puts Dallas in full control of a division that doesn’t quite seem as good as the combined 17-9 record suggests. 

The Eagles season won’t end this Sunday, no matter the result. But it most certainly may feel like it.