Vigil held on anniversary of Paterno's death

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Vigil held on anniversary of Paterno's death

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Flowers and mementos left by supporters adorned Joe Paterno's gravesite Tuesday, a year after the longtime Penn State coach's death, while at the spot where a bronze statue of him used to stand, a makeshift sign of cardboard flapped in a cold wind.

"Joseph Paterno. Always remembered. Always a legend," read the sign outside Beaver Stadium and attached to a tree with white wire.

The Hall of Fame coach died of lung cancer Jan. 22, 2012, at age 85. Besides the bouquets and signs, at least 150 supporters also marked the anniversary of his death with a candlelight vigil on a frigid evening at a downtown State College mural that includes a depiction of Paterno.

He died more than two months after being fired in the frantic days following the arrest of former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky on child molestation charges in November 2011. His legacy remains a sensitive topic for groups of alumni, former players and residents.

"I definitely think that everything that has happened isn't at all indicative of the kind of man that he was," said Bridget Beromedi, 32, of State College, who wore a shirt with Paterno's image. She held up a sign that read "JoePa. Legends never die."

She added that Paterno's role in the scandal "got totally overblown because of his name. He got an unfair deal."

Organizers lit candles inside white or blue paper bags, many inscribed with handwritten messages from supporters. The gathering slowly broke up within 45 minutes after mural artist Michael Pilato thanked attendees, several of whom wore "JVP" buttons on their winter parkas.

A family spokesman said the Paternos wouldn't take part in public gatherings Tuesday.

A year ago, the campus was flooded with mourners. Commemorations were much smaller this year with temperatures in the teens.

Supporters like Dan Hamm, a freshman from Williamsport, have said Paterno's 46-year career as a whole should be taken into consideration, including his focus on academics.

"We wanted to pay our respects. We wanted to celebrate who he was as a person," Hamm said after visiting Paterno's grave at a State College cemetery.

Then, nodding his head in the direction of Paterno's adorned gravesite, Hamm said, "You can see here that Joe Paterno was Penn State, and Penn State will always be Joe Paterno."

Former FBI director Louis Freeh released findings July 12 in the school's internal investigation of the scandal. Paterno's reputation was tarnished after Freeh accused the coach and three former school administrators of covering up allegations against Sandusky.

The retired defensive coordinator has been sentenced to at least 30 years in prison after being convicted of 45 criminal counts. Prosecutors said allegations occurred off and on campus, including the football facility. Sandusky has denied the allegations.

On July 22, Penn State removed Paterno's statue, which was a gathering point for mourners last January. The next day, the NCAA reacted with uncharacteristic swiftness in levying strict sanctions including a four-year bowl ban, strict scholarship cuts and a 60 million fine.

Paterno was also stripped of 111 victories, meaning he no longer held the major college record of 409 career wins.

Paterno's family and the three administrators have vehemently denied Freeh's allegations, along with denying suspicions they took part in a cover-up. Also, Paterno's family has been planning what a spokesman has called a comprehensive response to Freeh's findings.

But on Tuesday, the family remained in privacy. A delivery man dropped off flowers at the Paternos' modest ranch home in the afternoon, walking past a sign staked to the snow-covered lawn.

The sign read in part, "Thank you Joe! Thank you Sue!", referring to Paterno's widow. "RIP JoePa ... 409 forever."

The crowd at the vigil broke up after Pilato spoke for about five minutes. "If Joe Paterno is looking down on us tonight," he said, "we all know that he is not concerned with that number (409), but with the people connected with those wins.

He also said that Paterno's role was sensationalized in media coverage and by a rush to judgment. Pilato ended his talk by starting a chant of "Joe Paterno!"

Hamm's friend, fellow freshman Nick Bucci, said he felt his school handled the scandal well overall, given the extent of the fallout, with some exceptions.

At some point, Bucci said, the school should honor Paterno. He referred to one suggestion that dated back years before Paterno's death, of naming the field at the stadium after the coach.

But Bucci advocated for perspective.

"A day like today, those emotions might be high," said Bucci, of Dayton, Md. "I don't think now is the time to do it. I think you have to wait."

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Drexel's Chris Crawford soaks up tradition at U.S. Open

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USA Today Images

Drexel's Chris Crawford soaks up tradition at U.S. Open

ERIN, Wis. — The U.S. Open is all about tradition. This week is the 117th playing of golf's national championship and this event more than most celebrates those golfers who play the game as amateurs. 

Soon-to-be Drexel graduate Chris Crawford has been soaking up all the traditions this week at Erin Hills. Playing in his second U.S. Open after qualifying through both local and sectional competition for the second straight year, an extremely difficult feat, the 23-year-old fifth-year senior enjoyed the amateur dinner put on by the tournament organizers with the USGA. Crawford and his fellow amateurs, a stout list including Texas' Scottie Scheffler, who shot 3-under Thursday to seize the early low amateur lead, were celebrated the entire evening — one of Crawford's early highlights in a long week here in Wisconsin. 

Crawford produced a 3-over par 75 Thursday during the first round to tie for 102nd out of a field of 156 players.

"I played OK (Thursday)," Crawford said. "I'm going to take more positives than negatives out of the round. I played really well for 14 holes and just had a few bad swings on the other four holes."

Indeed, Thursday morning started nervously for the former Drexel golf standout. On the opening par-5 first hole, he snap-hooked his drive into the weeds out of bounds to the left, resulting in a double bogey. Three holes later, he chipped one shot over the back of the fourth green and took another double-bogey, placing him 4-over through four holes. 

Although bogeys might keep many of us alive in our weekend matches, it doesn't cut it in a U.S. Open. Crawford responded well in the ensuing 14 holes, going 1-under in that stretch.

Crawford's coach Mike Dynda, who teaches him at LuLu Country Club in Glenside, Pennsylvania, said he makes a big point to prepare Crawford's mind for his big rounds.

"I texted him last night and said, 'When you got to sleep, imagine that you're on the 18th hole and you have a putt for 9-under,'" Dynda said. "It's important to go to sleep and dream like that."

On the other side, Dynda — who taught the golf team at Drexel from 2003-2015 — also told his pupil to stay away from expectations. When you're 23 and you're playing in your second consecutive U.S. Open, one might think it would be easy to get ahead of yourself. Not so with Crawford, according to Dynda.

"I've taught him to not have any expectations for the five years we've been together," Dynda said. 

Crawford had a superstar practice round on Monday, playing with Jordan Spieth, Jim Furyk and Wisconsin's own Steve Stricker.

"It was a lot of fun playing with those guys and just watching them strategize about learning a brand new U.S. Open course," Crawford said. "I think that's the biggest thing I was impressed with, was the way they talked about strategy on this golf course.

"They were all very nice with me and were very specific to ask about me and they wanted to learn a little bit about my life, so I appreciated that."

For Dynda, talking with Furyk brought back a fond memory. Furyk's father, Mike, actually sold Dynda his first set of golf clubs, Tommy Armor 845s, back in Philadelphia years ago. 

With one round in the books and the forecast calling for rain this weekend, Crawford was looking forward to having the proper mentality as he headed into Friday's second round.

"I want to go out there and just not get ahead of myself," Crawford said. "I'm going to think positively and appreciate that I'm playing in the national open."

Crawford teed off at 2:31 p.m. local time off of the 10th hole.

"This week is so cool because I never do something like this," Crawford said. "Playing in front of such large crowds is a treat and I just love the interaction with the fans before and after the rounds as well."

Last year at Oakmont, dozens of friends and family made the drive down the turnpike to see him play in his first U.S. Open. This year, Crawford estimates that he has around 15 friends and family out in the galleries cheering him on. Though coach Dynda caddied last year, those duties have gone to current Drexel golf coach Ben Feld.

It's a party this week of Drexel golf proportions.

Atlantic 10 reveals 2017-18 schedule pairings

Atlantic 10 reveals 2017-18 schedule pairings

Philadelphia basketball fans will be getting a double dip of one of the Atlantic 10 conference's best rivalries once again next season.

With the league's 18-game regular season format in place for a fourth straight year, it was revealed Wednesday afternoon that Saint Joseph's and La Salle will battle twice — once in North Philly at Tom Gola Arena and a second time at the Hawks' home just off City Line Avenue. Each team in the 14-member conference will play eight teams once and five teams twice.

The full pairings for the Explorers and Saint Joe's are listed here:

La Salle
Home: Dayton, George Mason, St. Bonaventure, VCU, Fordham, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Saint Joseph’s, Saint Louis
Away: Davidson, Duquesne, George Washington, Richmond, Fordham, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Saint Joseph’s, Saint Louis

Saint Joseph’s
Home: Dayton, Duquesne, Saint Louis, VCU, Fordham, George Mason, La Salle, Massachusetts, St. Bonaventure
Away: Davidson, George Washington, Rhode Island, Richmond, Fordham, George Mason, La Salle, Massachusetts, St. Bonaventure

It was also rumored earlier in the day that the Hawks have added a Big Five matchup at Temple for Dec. 9.