Philadelphia 76ers

Coming Home: Allen Iverson eager to please Philly fans in BIG3 game

Coming Home: Allen Iverson eager to please Philly fans in BIG3 game

Allen Iverson plans to run on that familiar court one more time, cup his ear the way he used to in his prime and implore his adoring fans to make more noise.

AI is back home, Philly.

"It's exciting," Iverson told The Associated Press. "I just want to give them a couple flashbacks of the time I had here. I love them. The only relationship like the relationship I have with Philadelphia fans is (Michael Jordan) in Chicago. It's everlasting. They supported me all throughout my career, through all my ups and downs and that's why I love coming back here. They're the No. 1 fans in the world."

Iverson returns to the floor at the Wells Fargo Center on Sunday night when the Big3 comes to town. The main event features two Philadelphia legends. Iverson's 3's Company team faces Julius Erving's Tri-State team in the fourth game. Dr. J won't be playing, though.

Iverson hasn't done much of that, either. The former NBA MVP is a player-coach but he has spent more time coaching in the first three weeks. The 42-year-old has six points on 3-for-13 shooting.

"I'm going to do what's best to get us the win," Iverson said, explaining that he can't guard bigger opponents in the post.

That's just fine with Ice Cube.

"You gotta commend AI," the rapper-actor told AP. "He's trying to win. If he was on the ego tip, he wouldn't sub himself out, even though he's getting posted up. That's the cool thing about it. You see guys' real competitive juices going."

No matter how little he plays, Iverson is an integral part of Ice Cube's league of former NBA players.

"We don't launch without AI," Cube said. "We had names, we had players. But we didn't have box office, we didn't have that marquee name that you need to make a splash in a league like this. What's great with him and Dr. J and playing in Philly, you have Dr. J who helped cement the ABA, and you have Allen Iverson establishing the Big3. Years from now, we can look back and say this wouldn't have happened without AI taking a chance on us."

Iverson, who was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame last year, is enjoying the ride.

"Seeing guys give it their all and watching how the fans embrace it, guys putting on a show for them, that's what it's all about," he said. "These games haven't been watered down. They've been competitive. I like the direction it's heading. I'm happy to be a part of it. Years to come, I can brag to guys about being one of the first guys to play in the Big3 because it's going to soar, man. It's going to get bigger and bigger every year."

Three weeks into Season 1, Ice Cube is already thinking ahead.

"I can definitely see the future of this league where guys step straight from an NBA court onto a Big3 court," he said. "I think the competition is gonna get stiff. I'm pretty sure there's some big names out there waiting to play the game and have fun. Everybody is having a ball -- players, fans, the league."

Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons among Sixers at Eagles' home opener

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Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons among Sixers at Eagles' home opener

Philly teams supporting Philly teams.

Sixers head coach Brett Brown, Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons, Robert Covington, Richaun Holmes and Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot attended the Eagles’ home opener together Sunday.

While the Sixers watched the Eagles' game against the Giants from a suite, Embiid still high-fived with fans during the afternoon.

The Sixers and Eagles have close ties. Justin Anderson has longstanding friendships with Torrey Smith, Rodney McLeod and Chris Long (see story)

Sunday is the final day of the Sixers' offseason. Media day will be held Monday and training camp begins Tuesday at their training complex in Camden, New Jersey. 

Donald Trump starts war with sports, and athletes have united

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Donald Trump starts war with sports, and athletes have united

OAKLAND -- As President Donald Trump lurches closer to certified insanity, he is unwittingly doing the country a great service that, should we survive his dangerously whimsical term, will bring us closer to realizing our potential.

He’s unifying the previously disconnected and energizing the formerly apathetic. He’s even shaming some of those previously beyond shame.

It is because of Trump’s rage, unleashed in a span of less than 24 hours, that the NBA champion Warriors were more united Saturday morning than they were Friday afternoon.

After a speech in Alabama urging NFL owners on Friday to fire any “son of a bitch” who dared to protest peacefully to shine a light on injustices, Trump woke up Saturday and turned his Twitter ire upon Stephen Curry and the Warriors, conceivably the most wholesome representatives of American sports.

“That’s not what leaders do,” Curry said after practice Saturday.

“We know we’re in a fight,” Warriors center David West said. “And we’re going to continue to fight for our right to be human beings.”

But by advocating the job loss of peaceful protesters and then informing the Warriors they are not welcome at the White House -- because Curry said he’s not in favor of going -- we can only hope Trump has flung open a door of activism that never closes.

Trump’s radical combo ignited mighty blasts of blowback from players and coaches and commissioners of the NBA and NFL.

Among the many NBA figures issuing statements in one form or another, with varying degrees of condemnation: LeBron James, Chris Paul, Kobe Bryant, Magic Johnson, the players association and commissioner Adam Silver.

“The amount of support I saw around the league this morning was amazing,” Curry said.

Among the many NFL figures who were moved to comment: Seahawks players Richard Sherman and Michael Bennett, Broncos lineman Max Garcia, 49ers owner Jed York, New York Giants owners John Mara and Steve Tisch, Packers boss Mark Murphy, the players association and commissioner Roger Goodell.

Trump has, in short, started a war with American sports.

His strike began with the comments made Friday night that were directed at Colin Kaepernick and others who have declined to stand for the anthem. Trump’s aggression intensified Saturday when he went after Curry in the morning and Goodell in the afternoon.

How did we get here?

The Warriors on Friday announced their plan to meet as a team Saturday morning to decide whether they would accept from the White House the traditional invitation extended to championship teams. Though it was fairly certain they would not, they left open the slightest possibility. General manager Bob Myers had been in contact with White House.

Curry at the time said he, personally, did not wish to go, and then he carefully and patiently expounded on his reasons.

Trump responded, at 5:45 a.m. Saturday, to tell the world that the Warriors would not be invited and, moreover, that Curry’s resistance is the reason.

And all hell broke loose.

The Warriors came back Saturday afternoon with a statement that made clear there no longer would be a team meeting on the subject, that they were disappointed there was no open dialogue and that they will instead utilize their February visit to “celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion -- the values we embrace as an organization.”

“Not surprised,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said of Trump’s decision not to invite the Warriors to the White House. “He was going to break up with us before we could break up with him.”

Trump has fired upon every athlete in America. He is waking up this country in ways we’ve never seen or felt and, my goodness, he’s doing so at a level we’ve needed for centuries.

“Trump has become the greatest mirror for America,” West said. “My cousin . . . she brought that to me. Because there are a lot of things have been in the dark, hidden, and he’s just bold enough to put it out on ‘Front Street.’"