Philadelphia 76ers

Kane's NBA mock draft 1.0: What do Sixers do at No. 3?

Kane's NBA mock draft 1.0: What do Sixers do at No. 3?

The 76ers secured a top-three pick for the fourth straight year in Tuesday's NBA Draft Lottery. They will pick third overall for the third time during that four-year span courtesy of the pick swap that former GM Sam Hinkie engineered in a 2015 trade with the Kings. 

The downside of picking third is that top tier guards Markelle Fultz and Lonzo Ball will almost certainly come off the board with the first two picks. However, there will be plenty of All-Star level prospects remaining for the Sixers to choose from. 

With the top two picks all but locked in, you could argue that the draft actually starts when the 76ers go on the clock.

1. Boston Celtics - Markelle Fultz, guard, Washington (6-4/195)
Not a bad couple of days for Danny Ainge and the Celtics, who won the draft lottery Tuesday and will host the Cavaliers in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Finals on Wednesday. Boston shouldn't overthink this one — Fultz is easily the top prospect in this year's draft thanks to an offensive skill set that is tailor-made for today's NBA. The Celtics will pair him with Isaiah Thomas in the backcourt and compete for championships for the foreseeable future.   

2. Los Angeles Lakers - Lonzo Ball, guard, UCLA (6-6/190)
The Lakers lucked out by keeping their top-3 protected pick and the reward will be Ball, a playmaking point guard who is poised to be the next in a long line of Laker superstars. Ball has terrific size and is the best passer in the draft — his skills are comparable to Jason Kidd's and the man who will draft him, Magic Johnson. The only potential drawbacks are a funky jump shot and his meddlesome father, LaVar. 

3. Philadelphia 76ers - Josh Jackson, forward, Kansas (6-8/210)
Bryan Colangelo and the 76ers' brass will ultimately decide between three players here: Jackson, Duke's Jayson Tatum and Kentucky's Malik Monk.

I would take Tatum — I think he'll end up being the best player of the three. Monk's elite shooting makes him the best fit to play alongside Ben Simmons. But in the end, the Sixers will be swayed by Jackson's athleticism, defensive ability and overall potential. He comes with his share of question marks (including a few off the court) but there is no denying he has superstar potential. Jackson reminds me of Tracy McGrady, and pairing that type of talent with Simmons, Joel Embiid and Dario Saric is too enticing to pass up. 

4. Phoenix Suns - Jayson Tatum, forward, Duke (6-8/205)
Tatum represents tremendous value for the Suns with the fourth pick. I've been a big fan of his since his days as a high school standout in St. Louis and he made significant strides during his one season at Duke, particularly with his jump shot. Tatum will team up with Devin Booker to give the Suns an explosive 1-2 punch.   

5. Sacramento Kings - De'Aaron Fox, guard, Kentucky (6-3/170) 
Fox is a blur, hands down the fastest player in this draft. His stock soared during the NCAA Tournament after he outplayed Ball in Kentucky's win over UCLA in the Sweet 16. Fox gets to the basket whenever he wants but needs to improve his inconsistent outside jumper. If he does, he has the potential to eventually become one of the top five point guards in the NBA. 

6. Orlando Magic - Malik Monk, guard, Kentucky (6-3/200)
An exciting few minutes for John Calipari mugging for the cameras in the green room as Kentucky prospects go back-to-back. The Magic will be very fortunate to grab Monk with the sixth pick; he could go as high as third to the Sixers. He's the best shooter in the draft and will provide instant offense to a Magic team that could certainly use it. 

7. Minnesota Timberwolves - Jonathan Isaac, forward, Florida State (6-10/215)
I'm not as high on Isaac as others but he's worth the gamble here for Minnesota. Isaac's big selling point is his defensive versatility — he's able to guard multiple positions on the perimeter and in the post. His offensive consistency concerns me but it shouldn't concern Minnesota too much with Karl-Anthony Towns and Andrew Wiggins already on the roster.

8. New York Knicks - Dennis Smith, guard, NC State (6-3/195)
Smith is in the mold of Russell Westbrook — an aggressive, explosive guard who won't back down to anyone. He gives Knicks fans something to get excited about and head coach Jeff Hornacek an enticing perimeter piece to pair with budding superstar forward Kristaps Porzingis.

9. Dallas Mavericks - Lauri Markkanen, forward, Arizona (7-0/230)
With Dirk Nowitzki entering his 20th season, the Mavericks select a player in Markkanen who shares a lot of the traits Nowitzki had when he entered the league. Markkanen is an elite shooter for a 7-footer but is inexperienced and has plenty to learn. Who better to teach him than a Hall of Famer who just scored his 30,000th point last season?

10. Sacramento Kings - Zach Collins, forward, Gonzaga (6-11/230)
The Kings address the frontcourt with their second pick in the Top 10. Collins helped himself tremendously during Gonzaga's run to the National Championship Game. He's very skilled offensively and competes on the defensive end. 

11. Charlotte Hornets - Justin Patton, forward, Creighton (6-11/230)
Patton is a lottery pick based on raw athletic ability and upside. He might not contribute immediately but has the potential to be a game-changing big man on both ends of the floor. Patton only scratched the surface during his one season at Creighton.

12. Detroit Pistons - Frank Ntilikina, guard, France (6-5/190)
The Pistons could use a long-term answer at the point guard position and they find it here in Ntilikina, a rangy prospect with the ability to become a lockdown defender. His offensive skills need polishing.

13. Denver Nuggets - Harry Giles, forward, Duke (6-10/230)
Two years ago, Giles was a frontrunner to be the first pick in this draft. But a knee injury cost him his senior season of high school and he struggled to return to top form at Duke. But the skills that once made him an elite prospect remain. Giles just needs to get (and stay) healthy.  

14. Miami Heat - John Collins, forward, Wake Forest (6-9/225)
Collins was one of the most reliable and productive players in all of college basketball last season. He is a natural scorer in the low post and should help fill the void left by Chris Bosh on the Miami frontline. 

15. Portland Trail Blazers - Jarrett Allen, center, Texas (6-10/235)
Allen fits the bill in terms of what NBA teams look for in a big man — he scores in a variety of ways and protects the rim defensively. He put up solid numbers as a freshman at Texas and down the road he will provide balance for a Portland team that relies primarily on its backcourt. 

16. Chicago Bulls - Bam Adebayo, forward, Kentucky (6-10/245)
Adebayo made strides last season at Kentucky but he still as a long way to go before he can be counted on as a consistent offensive performer. But his size, defensive presence and rebounding ability make him a good fit for the Bulls. 

17. Milwaukee Bucks - Donovan Mitchell, guard, Louisville (6-2/210)
Mitchell is an elite athlete who was one of the best perimeter players in the country as a sophomore at Louisville. He was more of a combo guard in college but will be asked to play point guard in the NBA. That transition will take some time.  

18. Indiana Pacers - OG Anunoby, forward, Indiana (6-7/230)
Like a lot of players in this draft, Anunoby is billed as a defense-first prospect. So much so that a few Kawhi Leonard comparisons have already surfaced. I'm not ready to go there, but Anunoby certainly has the potential to develop into an elite defender.

19. Atlanta Hawks - T.J. Leaf, forward, UCLA (6-10/225)
Leaf has outstanding scoring skills for a big man and he displayed that offensive versatility last season at UCLA. He has a high basketball IQ, which helps compensate for his lack of elite athleticism. Leaf will fit in well with how the Hawks like to play under head coach Mike Budenholzer.

20. Portland Trail Blazers - Justin Jackson, forward, North Carolina (6-8/200)
Jackson capped his college career with a NCAA championship and ACC Player of the Year award at North Carolina. His versatility should serve him well at the pro level — he shoots consistently from the perimeter and drives to the basket effectively. 

21. Oklahoma City Thunder - Luke Kennard, guard, Duke (6-6/195)
Kennard had a breakthrough season at Duke that significantly elevated his status as a NBA prospect. He is an elite shooter with range well beyond the three-point arc. His spot-up shooting would be a great asset for a Thunder team built around Russell Westbrook.

22. Brooklyn Nets - Terrance Ferguson, guard, Australia (6-7/190)
Ferguson enters the draft by way of Australia, where he played professionally last year as an 18-year-old. He remains very raw but should have plenty of time to develop during the Nets' rebuilding period. 

23. Toronto Raptors - Ivan Rabb, forward, California (6-10/220)
Rabb arrived at California two years ago billed as a future NBA star but didn't do a whole lot to enhance his draft status during his college career. He'll need to improve a great deal on both ends of the floor but is worth a flier here for the Raptors, who need help inside.

24. Utah Jazz - Tyler Lydon, forward, Syracuse (6-9/215)
Lydon was very impressive at Syracuse. He's an intelligent player with a very dependable jump shot. His athleticism and defensive ability are question marks. He's far from a lock to be selected in the first round but could thrive in the right situation. 

25. Orlando Magic - Caleb Swanigan, forward, Purdue (6-9/250)
I'm higher on Swanigan's NBA potential than most. He was one of the best players in college basketball last season and has a very well-rounded offensive game. All the concerns center around his defensive ability. I view him as a winning player capable of helping Orlando immediately.

26. Portland Trail Blazers - Hamidou Diallo, guard, Kentucky (6-5/200)
Diallo enrolled at Kentucky early and may leave the school without ever playing a game. He has the elite athleticism that NBA talent evaluators covet but his offensive skills, particularly his jump shot, are a long way from being pro-ready. He's worth the risk for Portland and would be able to learn from two of the best guards in the league in Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum.

27. Brooklyn Nets - Ike Anigbogu, center, UCLA (6-10/250)
I view Anigbogu as a major project, but he's the type of player who could pay major dividends down the road for a Nets team that isn't in a hurry to contend. He didn't produce much offensively at UCLA but his defensive potential is his biggest asset.

28. Los Angeles Lakers - Jordan Bell, forward, Oregon (6-9/225)
Bell is a lot like Jonathan Isaac in that his biggest contribution will be the ability to guard multiple positions at the pro level. He always plays hard and has NBA-caliber athleticism. Bell could end up being a steal for the Lakers this low in the first round. 

29. San Antonio Spurs - Josh Hart, guard, Villanova (6-6/215)
Hart isn't showing up in the first round in most mock drafts but I'm convinced he's first-round worthy after watching every game he played during his four years at Villanova. He is a winning player who can guard multiple positions on the perimeter. He scores in a number of ways and has an effective, if not natural looking, jump shot. The best-case scenario is a winning team like the Spurs drafting him and molding him into their program. He's exactly the type of overlooked prospect that San Antonio banks on finding late in the first round. 

30. Utah Jazz - Rodionis Kurucs, forward, Latvia (6-8/200)
What would the first round be without one draft-and-stash prospect? Kurcus is an offensively gifted wing who appears to be a good fit in Utah's preferred style of offense.

Top Sixers Quotes: For JJ Redick, finally a 'sports town'

Top Sixers Quotes: For JJ Redick, finally a 'sports town'

CAMDEN, N.J. — Sixers president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo and all 20 players on the team's training camp roster spoke at the organization's training complex during media day.

Here are some of the best quotes from Colangelo and each player from Monday's session:

JJ Redick, who has played in Orlando, Milwaukee and Los Angeles, finally gets to play in a sports town.
“I’m going to offend some people in L.A. and Orlando, but I don’t know that I’ve played for a sports town. I’ve never played in a sports town. There are sports towns, right? New York is a sports town, Boston is a sports town, Chicago is a sports town. Those are sports towns. Philly’s a sports town. For me, I’m excited about that.”

Colangelo says Sixers are ready to take the next step.
“We have added a number of pieces, some familiar faces, some unfamiliar. But we feel that all in all, we’re going in with a good blend of that young core that we talk about. We talk about the veteran presence and inclusion with the mix, and feel that things are moving in the right direction with us and put us in a good position to compete and take another step forward as an organization.”

Philly has welcomed Markelle Fultz.
“I love it. Just walking around, just having the fans here. Just walking around hearing, ‘Trust the process.’ This team is just so young, so open. We’ve got some good vets here. Just coming here, I feel welcomed. It almost feels like I’m almost going back to college, just being welcomed. Just having everyone being around all the time. I love it. I don’t regret anything that happened. I’m excited.”

Ben Simmons doesn't care about a rookie survey.
“I don’t really worry about the guys coming in. I’m worried about the guys at the top. They’ll remember.”

Robert Covington is patient with his contract situation.
“We’ve definitely been in talks and everything. Both sides are very open to what is going on. It’s just a matter of the right move that’s to be made. Bryan is playing chess right now with the pieces that he’s adding. Now it’s just making sure that everything stays the way that he pictures.”

James Michael McAdoo wants to share some wisdom.
“I’m not going to sit here and act like I know everything. Obviously, I didn’t play a ton when I was there. But just being around those guys for three years and being able to pick their brains and just having such great teammates, guys that have been around the league so long and played at such a high level, I definitely look forward to getting into camp tomorrow and being able to share some of that wisdom and just experience with these guys. That’s where we want to be and tomorrow when we show up and these past couple months, that’s what we’ve been working to be.”

Joel Embiid wants to play ... like a guard?
“It’s just about being competitive. I love to win. I’ll do anything to win. I’ll put my body on the line to win. I’m a big man and I’ve never viewed myself as a big man. When I see guards doing certain things, I want to do that too because I’m a human being and it doesn’t matter that I’m seven feet. I want to do that too.

"I feel like people haven’t really seen what I can do and it’s also because I’ve only played 31 games. I think as long as I stay healthy, I have a lot to improve on and a lot of potential. I love it. I love when people criticize me. I love when you guys say whatever you have to say because that makes me go to the gym and work on me to improve myself.”

Jerryd Bayless knew he had to get his wrist repaired when ...
“Yeah, there was a moment. I think it was against the Bulls. I was dribbling and then I tried to go between my legs and the ball hit the wrist. I couldn’t control it. It was like a wet noodle almost. That’s when I knew I had to get it fixed. I wasn’t going to be able to play the rest of the season doing that.”

Amir Johnson’s opening statement to the media:
"My name is Amir Johnson. I'm new to the team. I'm happy to be here. Don't make it awkward."

Emeka Okafor, the 2nd overall pick in the 2004 draft, turns 35 on Thursday and has to prove he can still play.
“The hardest part actually has been the perception. In terms of my conditioning and my ability, especially after going down and playing with various teams, there’s no doubt in my mind I can play in this league and still contribute. I can contribute a lot both on and off the court. I understand the perception of my age and the fact that I’ve been away from the game for so long.

"That being said, being back in this environment, just being back in the NBA umbrella, with the guys and team and with you guys, talking to the press, just feels so good. It just feels like putting on a suit that’s always been the right fit, favorite pair of jeans, however you want to put it. It just feels very, very natural. I’m very excited to be here. I’m very excited for the process and whatever’s coming.”

Richaun Holmes is eager to battle for playing time.
“It’s fun, man. It’s competitive. This is competing every day. It’s fun, it’s kind of what I live for. I’ve never had any problems with it. I love playing against these guys, love getting better in practice against these guys. I just look for everything as an opportunity.”

Nik Stauskas still talks with John Beilein, his coach at Michigan.
“I stay in touch with Coach Beilein throughout the year. I wouldn’t say we talk regularly, but every now and then we stay in touch. His whole thing is just he always taught me to continue believing in myself, continue working. He saw me for two years in college, so he knows what I’m capable of. He understands how bad I want to be a great player in this league, so he just continues to encourage me. It’s great to have a powerful basketball mind like that on your side."

Justin Anderson wasn't concerned Nerlens Noel’s contract negotiations after the trade.
“My parents taught me to never worry about another man’s money, never worry about another man’s career. The best to him, but the reality of it is Bryan made a move to get me here. I’m very happy to be here. I text him before the season started not too long ago and said I won’t let you down. I’m going to make sure I handle everything that I need to handle to make sure that the season is successful not just for me but for my team.”

Jacob Pullen is ready to trust the process too.
“I was here for a couple weeks before signing and they’re ready to work. There are a lot of guys here that are ready to take the next step and show that they’re capable of winning games. They’ve been trusting the process and these guys believe. It’s a great group of guys here and I’m just ready to help.”

T.J. McConnell is happy to honeymoon ... in Camden? 
“I went home for about a month after the season was over to Pittsburgh and then I came back out here and I’ve been working out since May. Then I went back home to plan for the wedding a bit and then got married on Sept. 9. What’s better than a honeymoon in Camden, New Jersey?”

If Kris Humphries, a 13-year veteran, could take a time machine ...
“Someone asked me earlier today, what would you tell your rookie self? I said to shoot threes so I could get a jump-start on that. I started shooting threes at like age 30. People were kind of like, ‘You can’t do it that late. You are who you are.’ I kind of took that as a challenge and expanded my game.

"Being in Boston and then Atlanta, kind of the system and playing out on the floor and making decisions, that open-style basketball, which is a lot of what they’re doing here. It’s pretty cool to kind of build on what I’ve been doing and also be that guy that continues to work hard and help the young guys. I’ve always been just a hard worker, earn-it type guy in my career. Just continue to do that.”

Furkan Korkmaz needs to hit the gym and play better D.
“My first goal was to come here and work individually to put on some pounds, to get some kilos. Then to work on my weaknesses. I know everyone is talking about my defense now, but I think I will be a great defender.”

How James Blackmon Jr. earn a roster spot?
“I feel like my scoring, not just shooting the ball, but my scoring and making plays offensively is definitely what got me here. I just feel like bringing that same effort and intensity on defense is what’s going to make me stay.”

Dario Saric needs some sleep.
“I’m feeling a little bit tired. It’s not too much. I didn’t expect to finish the national team like that. That’s because I was feeling a little bit different than usual. My physical things, I’m feeling a little bit tired. I don’t have any problems, any health problems. I think before the season starts I’ll be mentally ready, physically ready and ready to play every game and give 100 percent.”

No more McDonald's for a slimmed down Jahlil Okafor.
“It wasn’t easy. The first drastic change I made was my diet. I became a vegan. I didn’t jump full vegan. I gradually made my way to that. First I took out dairy. I took out steak and chicken and fish and then some of my favorites like cheese. All the other BS I was putting in my body I cut out.

"The reason for doing that was so that I could become healthy. I read somewhere that dairy wasn’t inflammatory and my knee was always swelling up last season. I had no idea about that, so once I found that out, I cut out dairy. Now I’m a full-on vegan and I feel great. I’m gonna stick with it.”

Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot's knee is finally feeling better.
“I think as the season went along last year it got a little bit worse and worse every game and every week. I just kind of felt it during summer league a little bit. Afterward, I stopped playing for a little while. Then when I got back to the national team, I did an MRI and it showed something on my tendon. Directly after, I came back here. The week after, I got a PRP injection. Since that time, I’ve just kept going and my knee has been feeling way better right now. I’ll be ready. I can’t say when like an exact date but I think it’ll be little time.”

And finally ... a budding bromance between Redick and Embiid?
“In terms of the dynamic of the two of us, I think we can balance each other out. I can provide things for him and he provides things for me. I think we complement each other really well. An example, of course, would be spacing. But I also think because of my cutting and my off-ball movement, his passing, his screening, his rolling, my pocket passes, those are all things that sort of complement each other.

"Defensively, he gives me a lot of confidence to guard a guy when I have somebody like Joel similar to how I’ve had at different times in my career with DeAndre (Jordan) and Dwight (Howard) protecting the rim. Those are all things that I think are sort of complements to each other that we’re going to work really well together.

I'm flattered that you guys think ... I’m not serious. It’s hour four of media day, give me a break here. I think there’s a budding bromance between Joel and I, I really do. I’m looking forward to sort of just letting it develop.”

Markelle Fultz already showing he's no ordinary No. 1 overall pick

Markelle Fultz already showing he's no ordinary No. 1 overall pick

CAMDEN, N.J. — The life of a No. 1 overall pick can get pretty hectic, particularly during the summer heading into their first season.

Getting acclimated to a new city, making appearances, signing endorsement deals, etc. The list goes on forever.

Unless that top pick is Markelle Fultz.

“I did a lot of basketball stuff, just traveling around for basketball purposes,” Fultz said of his summer during Sixers media day. “Of course being the No. 1 pick, a lot of stuff comes along with that."

“I just recently went back to Seattle to hang out with some of my college friends, but other than that, getting in the gym has been the most fun thing for me.”

If there is one thing to know about Fultz so far, it’s that he is constantly working to hone his craft.

Put aside the left ankle sprain he suffered in the Las Vegas Summer League that forced him to spend some time healing up and the 19-year-old spent virtually the entire offseason on the court.

“My summer’s pretty much just been of course rehab for my ankle, which is way better now,” said Fultz, who averaged 16.0 points, 3.0 rebounds and 2.3 assists in three summer league games before the injury. “Just learning the plays and just learning my teammates. Really just enjoying this process, having fun and getting ready.

“I stay in the gym 24/7. Even at home, I’m fortunate enough to have a basketball court outside. Just staying around the game, just playing, shooting trick shots as a lot of people know I like doing. Like I said, just trying to learn the plays to the best of my ability so I can be ready for the season.”

Fultz’s gym-rat mentality combined with his skill set is what ultimately made Sixers president Bryan Colangelo feel comfortable enough to send the No. 3 pick and a protected first-round pick to the Boston Celtics to move up to the top of the draft.

“We felt that that decision was the right one at the time and it’s the right one now,” Colangelo said of the deal. “Markelle is a tremendous young talent. He’s got a high ceiling. He’s very young, but certainly someone that we’re excited to have in the fold with our young core of players that we’ve been bringing together.”

While Fultz certainly fits into the team’s mold of recent selections, it’s how he meshes with previous No. 1 overall pick, Ben Simmons, that could ultimately decide how successful he is in Philadelphia.

Sixers head coach Brett Brown has made clear his desire to use the 6-foot-10, 230-pound Simmons as the squad’s primary point guard. That means Fultz will get moved to shooting guard, a change he views as a plus and not a problem.

“I think I’ll be comfortable with it. My main goal is just to do whatever I have to do to help the team win and if that’s me playing on and off the ball, that’s what I’m willing to do,” Fultz said. “I think the success is going to be high really just because it’s going to throw teams off. You don’t know who’s bringing it up, who’s going to get it. I’m definitely looking forward to it.”

Never lacking in confidence, Fultz reiterated on several occasions that his backcourt partnership with Simmons would work and that the Sixers would reach the postseason.

When you put in the tireless work on the court like Fultz does, you expect results.

“My first goal is always team first and myself, I always have to keep my confidence high,” he said. “In order to be great, I set high goals for myself so that I can achieve them.

“It’s not only my mindset. You ask any of my teammates, they’re going to say the same thing — it’s getting back to the playoffs, that we’re going to make it. Really it’s just the way I believe, the way I think. That’s the way you have to think in order to change things around. In order to be successful, you can’t think that you’re not going to make it. Your chances of doing that are going to be low, so you have to believe it in order to do it.”