10 observations from Eagles-Bears

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10 observations from Eagles-Bears

CHICAGO -- There was some good. There was some bad. There was some really bad. And then there was Roc Carmichael.

It was certainly a tough evening for Carmichael, Jordan Matthews, Allen Barbre, Nick Foles and a handful of other Eagles Friday night in the preseason opener, a 34-28 loss to the Bears at Soldier Field (see Instant Replay).

But it was a good day for Mark Sanchez, Beau Allen, Zach Ertz and Vinny Curry, among others.

It’s the first of 20 (at least), so please welcome back … Roob’s 10 Observations!

1. Can’t say I’m concerned with Foles’ performance, but he was so bad — two interceptions in nine attempts, with a third INT dropped — that it does give the next two preseason games a little more importance. Foles wasn’t great last preseason — he didn’t throw a touchdown and went on to have one of the greatest seasons any QB has ever had. With the pressure of a QB competition off, Foles has the freedom to make throws he might ordinarily not make. It seemed like he was really focusing on getting rid of the ball quickly Friday night, and he got himself into trouble a few times with poor decisions.

2. I am a little concerned with Barbre, who is pegged to start the first four games at right tackle while Lane Johnson serves his suspension. Barbre got pushed around a little bit by the Bears, but this was his first real playing time at right tackle since 2009 with the Packers, so it shouldn’t be all that surprising. But keep an eye on him. He needs to be better.

3. First defense did some good things, but I didn’t like those two third-and-long conversions by the Bears on their second drive — a 3rd-and-11 and a 3rd-and-10 that led to the Bears’ first TD. Billy Davis wasn’t dialing up any exotic stuff, and there wasn’t a lot of pass pressure, but third-and-long was a problem last year. The Eagles allowed 18 conversions on 3rd-and-10 or longer last year, and only the Dolphins (20) and Vikings (22) allowed more. That’s got to change, so something to keep an eye on.

4. Saw some good things from special teams. Damion Square blocked a field goal, Alex Henery’s kickoffs all went into the end zone, and rookie Josh Huff looked fast and decisive on his explosive 102-yard kickoff return touchdown. The Eagles made a lot of changes on special teams this offseason, and it looks like they’re paying off. The return game was awful last year. If Huff can be a quality kick returner, that would really solve a huge question mark facing the Eagles.

5. Loved what I saw out of Beau Allen. It’s tough to evaluate the young defensive lineman, since the Eagles don’t do live goal-line or short-yardage anymore at practice. But Allen was very active in his NFL debut, stout against the run and got great push in the pocket.

6. Good stuff — as you’d expect — from Sanchez. Say what you want, he’s one of the best backup quarterbacks in the league. How many teams have a No. 2 quarterback who’s won four playoff games and has one of the 15 highest passer ratings in NFL postseason history? Put a smart, veteran QB in a preseason game against a second-team defense and you’re going to get efficiency, and Sanchez was sharp, completing 7 of 10 passes for 79 yards, with two touchdown drives. In 19 of the last 23 seasons, the Eagles’ No. 2 quarterback has started at least one game, so it’s a critical spot, and the Eagles are in good hands if Sanchez has to play.

7. Not an auspicious debut for Matthews, the rookie second-round pick. He had three drops in all. The first one was a tough catch, the next two are catches he has to make. Matthews finished with four receptions for 14 yards with a long of five. I’ve always said wideout is the toughest position for rookies to come in and shine. Matthews has all the tools, and I think he’ll be fine, but it’s not going to happen immediately.

8. Was good to see Jeremy Maclin play for the first time since 2012. Foles targeted him once, and he caught a 15-yarder. The Eagles were awfully vanilla offensively, and I feel like Maclin needs a good bit of work before the regular season. He’s been OK at practice but hasn’t flashed. He still looks a little rusty. Good start but a ways to go.

9. The Eagles have some crazy depth at running back. After Shady McCoy, Darren Sproles and Chris Polk, you have Matthew Tucker, who looked terrific Friday night (minus a fumble) and then you saw what David Fluellen can do, with six runs for 25 yards and an acrobatic 14-yard touchdown catch from Matt Barkley. Good production.

10. Was disappointed in Barkley. There’s been a lot of talk about how far he’s come and how much he’s improved, how he’s gotten stronger, healthier, but he just didn’t look sharp at all, going 7 for 16 for 73 yards with the one TD to Fluellen on a play that was really all Fluellen, and one interception. Was looking for a lot more.

Eagles wise to bring Jason Peters back, even with full salary

Eagles wise to bring Jason Peters back, even with full salary

This isn't a big surprise, but Jason Peters will be back with the Eagles — big salary and all — for the 2017 season.

While the Eagles approached the veteran left tackle about his contract in January, Peters has not restructured his deal, according to a league source. 

NFL Network's Ian Rapoport on Thursday morning reported that Peters will be back next season on his normal contract. 

Yes, Peters is expensive in 2017. His base salary after hitting another Pro Bowl escalator written into his contract is up to $10.45 million for next season (plus a $250K workout bonus), which comes with a big cap hit of $11.7 million. That cap hit is the highest on the team, but not outlandish for a high-caliber left tackle. 

The Eagles could have very well cut Peters and moved on. It would have saved them significant cap space to use elsewhere. They just wouldn't have found any player more valuable to pay with that money. 

Peters, 35, is still their best option to protect Carson Wentz's blind side. He made his ninth Pro Bowl in 2016 after playing all 16 games. The team hasn't been shy about wanting him back and Peters toward the end of the season said he wanted to return for another year. 

"We certainly want to have him back," Eagles vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said of Peters in early January.

“I love him. I want him on the team,” head coach Doug Pederson said with two games remaining this past season. “I don’t want him to go anywhere."

With Peters back, it means Lane Johnson's eventual trip to left tackle will be held off for another year. Eventually, he'll take over that spot … just not right now. 

During the season, Peters opened up about his future, saying he hopes Wentz can be the guy who finally gets him a Super Bowl ring (see story).

Eagles Mailbag: Restructuring Barwin, Allen Barbre, Jason Kelce's importance

Eagles Mailbag: Restructuring Barwin, Allen Barbre, Jason Kelce's importance

We answered half of your questions in the first mailbag this week (see story)

But there are plenty more to go. 

With free agency just around the corner, let's not waste any time jumping into today's questions: 

I don't think so. 

Yeah, moving on from Connor Barwin is going to be tough. He's a great guy and has been a tremendous asset in the community. His foundation is amazing. But on the field, his production dropped while his price tag soared. That's a problem. 

Barwin has said publicly that he'd be willing to take a pay cut to stay in Philly. He's a smart guy and knew there's no way the Eagles are going to keep him around with an $8.35 million cap hit, especially when they can save $7.75 million of that if they cut him. ... So maybe they would keep him at a reduced rate. There's logic in that, but it's time to move on. I don't think Barwin would really want to stay for the pay cut it would probably take. 

Right now, Barwin is blocking Vinny Curry from seeing significant playing time. And while Curry didn't have a good year in 2016, he's getting paid a lot, so it's time to see if he can live up to that contract. 

And for Barwin, while he loves Philly and has made this his home, he deserves to be in a defense that fits him better.

I'm a little surprised more haven't come already. To me, this likely means the Eagles are trying to exhaust any trade options first. Why cut a guy if you can get some kind of return, even a late-round or conditional pick? 

There's no real harm in waiting right now, and maybe the team will find a trade partner for one of their players on the chopping block. 

I always like these hypotheticals from Drew. Basically, I'd keep the youngest and most-talented players:

Carson Wentz, Fletcher Cox, Lane Johnson, Jordan Hicks, Malcolm Jenkins. 

Wentz, Cox and Johnson were pretty easy. Then I really struggled. Jenkins is the oldest guy on the list, but he's so important to the team. I left off Brandon Graham and Zach Ertz and Brandon Brooks and Jordan Matthews, which I'm not so sure about. This was harder than I anticipated. 

I guess you're talking about Allen Barbre's hamstring injury. Yeah, barring something I don't know about, he should be completely healed and ready to go. 

Here's something to think about, though: Barbre will be 33 when the 2017 season starts and I wouldn't put him down in pen as the starter at left guard next year. If Jason Kelce is still on the team, he'll be the center, but why not let Isaac Seumalo battle for the left guard job? 

If Seumalo wins the spot, then Barbre is still a relatively inexpensive and really good backup option. 

I honestly think Jason Kelce is better than most fans in this city think. People see him get blown up a few times in a year — really blown up — and think he's an awful player. He's not. No, he can't go 1-on-1 with nose tackles, but he's still great at getting downfield and into the second level. 

And then there's the importance of the center. I don't know exactly how important he is in terms of calling the shots on the line, but he didn't miss a single snap in 2016. I know cutting or trading Kelce would save significant cap space, but I wouldn't do it. The Eagles have shown they'll do whatever it takes to develop Wentz; I think keeping his veteran center for a second year would help.