10 observations from Eagles-Buccaneers

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10 observations from Eagles-Buccaneers

BOX SCORE

Where do you start?

The Buccaneers piled up more than 500 yards. They ran for nearly 300 yards. Their 21-year-old rookie quarterback playing in his 10th career game threw five touchdown passes.

45-17? This was an absolute disgrace for the Eagles, who became only the second team since 1950 to allow 280 rushing yards and five TDs in a home game (see Instant Replay).

I could have written 500 points off this game, but the rules say just 10.

So buckle up and read on.

1. If this game demonstrated anything, it’s how desperately the Eagles need what Tampa has. A young quarterback to build around. I’ve been harping about this all year, but until the Eagles draft a quarterback they believe can be a franchise guy, they’re just not going to win a thing. If you have Michael Vick, Nick Foles, Sam Bradford or Mark Sanchez, you might win a few games here and there and you might even sneak into the playoffs once in a while. But let’s face it. The Eagles aren’t going anywhere with Bradford or Sanchez (more on Sanchez here). They’re buried in mediocrity right now, winning too many games to get a pick to draft a Jameis Winston or Marcus Mariota but not winning enough to be taken seriously. This will be seven straight years without a playoff win for the Eagles, and it’s no coincidence that coincides with Donovan McNabb’s career winding down. Think about this. Winston is 21 years old. The Bucs won two games last year but have solidified their future for the next decade with one draft pick. The Eagles won’t draft No. 1 but they’ve got to find somebody because without a young, elite, stud QB, they’re just not going anywhere.

2. And onto the defense. Goodness gracious. I don’t like to use the word gutless, but I don’t know a word that better describes the effort the Eagles showed against an average offense — ranked No. 14 in the league coming in. They allowed Doug Martin runs of 58 and 84 yards — equaling his career total of two runs of 50 yards before halftime. They let Winston — who had thrown four touchdown passes in Tampa’s last five games combined — throw four before halftime and five in all. They gave up 521 total yards, fifth-most they’ve ever allowed at home. Ever. I’m not sure how it got this bad. The Eagles’ defense was actually very good up through the Giants game and pretty good since. Sure, they lost Jordan Hicks, but come on. Something much deeper is missing. I’ve always been a big Bill Davis fan, and I always thought once he got decent players he’d be a very good coach, but I have to question everything right now. Every player, every coach, every scheme. This was a disgrace, and it’s getting worse. The product the defense put out there in its own stadium was embarrassing and pitiful and inexcusable (see story). This is the kind of game that gets people fired. And it should. Somebody should pay for this.

3. I very much believe the Eagles’ problems go beyond offense and defense and beyond personnel. They don’t seem to fight back when bad things happen. They had a 13-point lead at home last week against a last-place team that just fired its coach and was playing on the road for a third straight week, and they just kind of stopped playing, stopped fighting. And then this on top of that? It raises very sobering questions about Chip Kelly and his ability to get this team to play hard and to play hard for 60 minutes. The Eagles have now won five of their last 14 games, and this is the team Chip wanted, the team Chip built. I won’t go as far as saying the Eagles quit because I didn’t see that. But my doubts about Chip’s ability to lead this team and prepare this team and get this team ready to play a football game are only getting stronger. The Eagles just lost back-to-back games at home to teams with losing records, and they lost both in embarrassing fashion (see story), getting outscored, 17-3, by Miami after the first quarter and, 38-14, Sunday. That reflects on one person more than any other: Chip.

4. Let’s try to put the Buccaneers’ offensive performance in context. They amassed 285 rushing yards and five touchdown passes against the Eagles’ utterly overmatched defense. That makes the Bucs the first NFL team since 1977 and only the seventh team in NFL history with five TD passes and 280 rushing yards in the same game.  

5. It’s tough to single out anybody on the defense as being particularly bad because everybody was Sunday. But I really can’t believe what I’ve seen so far from Kiko Alonso. He had that interception on opening day and obviously he missed a huge chunk of the season, but when he has played he’s been completely ineffective against the run, a non-factor in coverage and unable to produce any big plays. Maybe my expectations were too high coming off a season lost to injury and considering he missed half the season. But the Eagles gave up LeSean McCoy for this guy, and they haven’t gotten anything back.

6. Let’s touch for a moment on Martin. He’s a very tough back, a solid player. But he hasn’t been an elite back since 2012, when he had his only 1,000-yard season. Hasn’t been healthy since. So for the Eagles to stand there and let him have the biggest game ever against the Eagles is shocking. The Eagles have faced Walter Payton, Tony Dorsett, Jim Brown, Adrian Peterson … none of them ever ran for 235 yards against this football team. It wasn’t that long ago the Eagles had the No. 2 rush defense in the NFL. Going into Week 7. But stopping the run is an attitude. It’s a mentality. It’s mental and physical toughness. It’s want-to. You have to want to. When you lack all those qualities, this is what you get. An absolute embarrassment. On their own turf. In front of their own fans. Martin reached 240 yards twice late in the game — which is the most anybody has ever gained against the Eagles — but he finished with 235 yards, two shy of Emmitt Smith’s and Brown's record. Still. The Eagles are only the eighth team since 1960 — more than 60 years — to allow a back 235 rushing yards in its own stadium. Pathetic.

7. I really want to hear Chip after the game say, “I did not have this team prepared. I did not do my job. This is my fault. This was an embarrassing loss and it’s all on me.” Because say what you want about Davis and everybody else, this is Chip’s team right now and this was an abomination. I’d like to see him be accountable (here's what Chip had to say).

8. Did you see Sanchez and Darren Sproles having words after Sanchez’s third interception — Lavonte David’s pick-six in the fourth quarter? Maybe Sproles did run the wrong route, but that’s the last thing this team needs right now, the quarterback and running back yapping at each other (see story). Sanchez is fiery, and fiery is fine. But when you’re down, 45-17, in the fourth quarter in your own stadium, and you’re about to fall to 4-6 with your second straight humiliating loss, you don’t need that stuff. Be a leader. Help the Eagles out of this instead of making it worse.

9. Is it even fair for you guys to go through all of that and then start talking about the Eagles’ wide receivers? What the heck. It’s truly painful to watch this group (more on offense here). Nelson Agholor was invisible again Sunday, with three catches for 11 yards. That’s 14 for 148 in six games. The Eagles really need to find a way to get this kid going.

10. And only four days until their next game!

Eagles pick up compensatory fourth-round pick from Browns

Eagles pick up compensatory fourth-round pick from Browns

The NFL announced the list of compensatory picks for the 2017 draft and the Eagles weren't awarded any.

They're still going to get one, though. 

Thanks to the trade with the Browns to move up to No. 2 in last year's draft, the Eagles got back a conditional fifth-round pick that has now turned into a fourth. 

Basically, if the Browns received a fourth-round compensatory pick, the Eagles would get it. The Browns were awarded two (Nos. 139 and 142), so the Eagles get one. According to a league source, the Eagles will get No. 139 overall, the higher of the two.  

This is the first year teams are allowed to trade compensatory picks. The Bengals, Browns, Broncos and Chiefs were each awarded four compensatory picks. The highest compensatory pick awarded this year belongs to Miami at No. 97 in the third round. 

The Eagles still don't know where they'll pick in the first round -- either No. 14 or 15. That will be determined by a coin flip next week at the combine in Indianapolis. They have eight draft picks in total.

Eagles wise to bring Jason Peters back, even with full salary

Eagles wise to bring Jason Peters back, even with full salary

This isn't a big surprise, but Jason Peters will be back with the Eagles -- big salary and all -- for the 2017 season.

While the Eagles approached the veteran left tackle about his contract in January, Peters has not restructured his deal, according to a league source. 

NFL Network's Ian Rapoport on Thursday morning reported that Peters will be back next season on his normal contract. 

Yes, Peters is expensive in 2017. His base salary after hitting another Pro Bowl escalator written into his contract is up to $10.45 million for next season (plus a $250K workout bonus), which comes with a big cap hit of $11.7 million. That cap hit is the highest on the team, but not outlandish for a high-caliber left tackle. 

The Eagles could have very well cut Peters and moved on. It would have saved them significant cap space to use elsewhere. They just wouldn't have found any player more valuable to pay with that money. 

Peters, 35, is still their best option to protect Carson Wentz's blind side. He made his ninth Pro Bowl in 2016 after playing all 16 games. The team hasn't been shy about wanting him back and Peters toward the end of the season said he wanted to return for another year. 

"We certainly want to have him back," Eagles vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said of Peters in early January.

“I love him. I want him on the team,” head coach Doug Pederson said with two games remaining this past season. “I don’t want him to go anywhere."

With Peters back, it means Lane Johnson's eventual trip to left tackle will be held off for another year. Eventually, he'll take over that spot … just not right now. 

During the season, Peters opened up about his future, saying he hopes Wentz can be the guy who finally gets him a Super Bowl ring (see story).