Philadelphia Eagles

2017 NFL draft: Sherman's Round-by-round targets for Eagles, 1.0

2017 NFL draft: Sherman's Round-by-round targets for Eagles, 1.0

Despite their 7-9 record this season, the Eagles took a big step forward with rookie Carson Wentz, who started all 16 games and confirmed that indeed they have a potential franchise QB.

The Birds can now focus on putting the necessary tools around him to ensure he can take the next step to leading this franchise to where the Patriots and Falcons are today.

While we still have a long way to go before the NFL draft, here's an early look at some players the Eagles should be looking at in each round. Keep in mind, the number of their first-round pick is pending a coin flip with Indianapolis, and the later-round numbers could change pending the awarding of compensatory picks.

First Round (No. 14 or 15) - For Paul Hudrick's full first-round mock draft 1.0, click here.

Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan
It's no secret the Eagles need more talent at wideout, and this draft offers several solid options in the middle of the first round. Davis is the best among the them. With size (6-foot-3/215 pounds), ball skills and excellent route-running ability, Davis has the look of a No. 1 WR. The one potential knock on him is his speed, and with an ankle injury suffered during pre-draft training (and subsequent surgery), there's a good chance he won't be able to put that question to rest during the combine. That might work to the Eagles' benefit, however, because a fast 40-time might put Davis out of range.

Sidney Jones, CB, Washington
No surprise there's a corner on this list. Jones is a potential lockdown guy who plays hard every snap and has the swagger and confidence you want in a man-to-man cover guy. His size (6-foot-1/170 pounds) is a bit concerning, but you have to think time in an NFL weight room and lunch table will help that.

Reuben Foster, LB, Alabama
The Birds have a budding star in MLB Jordan Hicks and a solid pro in Nigel Bradham at the SAM position, but with Mychal Kendricks' future up in the air, Foster could make an already good unit a great one. He would be an ideal WILL LB, using his speed to make plays sideline to sideline and delivering the kind of hits the Eagles' defense has lacked since Brian Dawkins retired. Foster stood out to me like Luke Kuechly did when I watched the Panthers' star at Boston College — he's just everywhere.  

Second Round (No. 43)

Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford
I don't see McCaffrey as an every-down back in the NFL, but I could see Doug Pederson trying to use him in a similar way the Chargers and Pats used Danny Woodhead — especially in the passing game. McCaffrey's size (6-foot/197 pounds) may be limiting in terms of the number of carries he has per game, but his ability to create mismatches in the short passing game could provide Carson Wentz another reliable option and help prepare for the inevitable departure of Darren Sproles.

Pat Elflein, C, Ohio State
Not sexy, but if Jason Kelce is released and Isaac Seumalo is deemed a better fit at OG, Elflein could be an immediate starter for the Birds. The three-time All-Big Ten selection is smart, physically stout and versatile (he earned his first selection as an OG). He could be a 10-year starter.

Budda Baker, S, Washington
I have a feeling Baker will be snatched up by this point, but there's a chance his size (5-foot-10/180 pounds) could cause him to slip a bit. Baker is a tenacious player with fantastic instincts and ball skills. Safety isn't the Eagles' biggest need, but the defense needs more winners and playmakers, and Baker is both, even if it's in a part-time role early in his career.

Third Round (No. 74)

Adoreé Jackson, CB, USC
Jackons is an unbelievable athlete who doubles as a lethal return man. Size (5-foot-11/185 pounds) may keep him in the slot, but the Eagles could use the ball skills and explosive speed Jackson offers.

Samaje Perine, RB, Oklahoma
A bowling ball of a back (5-foot-10/235 pounds), Perine has the size to carry a heavy load. More power than finesse, Perine could be a valuable goal-line asset.

Taywan Taylor, WR, Western Kentucky
Taylor is fast, lightning quick and dangerous on quick outs and bubble screens. His hands are a bit suspect, his route tree was limited, and his size will probably restrict him to the slot, but Taylor's exciting run-after-catch skills are tantalizing.

Fourth Round (No. 108)

Corn Elder, CB, Miami(FL)
On talent alone, Elder could be a first-round pick, but size (5-foot-10/179 pounds) is going to stunt his draft position. Elder is as nasty as they come, and the 2016 All-ACC First Teamer would be an ideal slot corner.

Ryan Glasgow, DT, Michigan
Stout, tough and energetic, Glasgow would add needed interior depth if the Eagles lose Bennie Logan to free agency.

Julie'n Davenport, OT, Bucknell
A project, Davenport lacks experience against top competition, but his size (6-7/310) is outstanding, and he has the physical tools to develop into a possible backup.

Fifth Round (No. 138)

Trey Hendrickson, DE, Florida Atlantic
With Marcus Smith's and Connor Barwin's days numbered, the Eagles may be looking for help at DE. Hendrickson is an effort guy who may have some pass-rush ability with continued coaching.

Jarrod "Chunky" Clements, DT, Illinois
Solid but unspectacular interior lineman who flashes penetration skills. Definitely a rotation guy who can spell the starters when needed.

Sixth Round (No. 168)

James Conner, RB, Pittsburgh
Conner battled Hodgkin's lymphoma during his college career and was able to make it back to the field and excel. He's the kind of guy you want on your team, and his power and size (6-foot-2/235 pounds) could make him a short-yardage specialist.

Michael Roberts, TE, Toledo
Not a huge need for the Eagles, but Brent Celek can't play forever. Roberts is a bigger TE who has experience inline blocking and makes all the catches he should.

Jerod Evans, QB, Virginia Tech
Again, not a need, but Chase Daniel is expensive and there's nothing there after that. Evans has interesting measurables and physical skills to work with.

Seventh Round (No. 201)

Sean Harlow, OL, Oregon State
Harlow was a tackle in college but will kick inside to either guard or center in the NFL. Not outstanding in any one area, Harlow could provide versatility and depth.

Derek Griffin, WR, Texas Southern
A total project, Griffin is huge (6-foot-7/225 pounds) and was dismissed by Texas Southern three games into the 2016 season for breaking team rules. The former Miami(FL) recruit also played basketball in college (averaged a double-double during 2015/16 season).

Wendell Smallwood ready for his 'chance to take it' in Eagles' next preseason game

Wendell Smallwood ready for his 'chance to take it' in Eagles' next preseason game

Don't give that fourth running back spot to Corey Clement just yet.

Wendell Smallwood isn't going to go down quietly.

Smallwood, the Eagles' second-year running back from West Virginia, is back practicing with no restrictions after missing nearly two weeks with a hamstring injury.

Smallwood has yet to play in a preseason game, and with undrafted rookie Clement acquitting himself well both at practice and in the first couple preseason games, the pressure is on Smallwood to produce soon to secure a roster spot.

“It was real frustrating," Smallwood said after practice Monday. "Just missing those reps, missing two straight preseason games, not being able to get better. You get better with those game reps and those practice reps, so I think I need to start taking advantage of every one I have."

Smallwood got hurt two weeks ago Monday, and although he returned on a limited basis last week, Monday's practice with the Dolphins was his first with no restrictions since he got hurt.

He looked good. He looked fast and physical. And he said he finally feels 100 percent.

“I think so," he said. "I feel good. Today I forgot about it. Wasn’t even thinking about the injury. Didn’t think twice about cuts, running, bursting, anything like that. I think I got it back.

"It’s a huge relief just because last week practicing I could sense that it was still there and I was still kind of thinking about it, and the coaches could sense it, so being this week, I’m full go, it’s not bothering me. You could see I got some of my burst back. I’m good."

Eagles offensive coordinator Frank Reich said Monday that Smallwood is more of an every-down back than he first realized.

"You know, I think Wendell is a true three-down back," he said. "When we first drafted him, I kind of looked at him as more like a first- and second-down back. I thought he would be OK on third down, but really he's turned out to be better on third down than I thought.

"So really I think he is a very versatile back who knows protections very well, who runs good routes, who catches the ball well. And then I think he's a slashing runner on first and second down, so we like that combination. He's done very well. He works very hard at it. Love him mentally, and really glad he's in the mix."

Smallwood played well early last year before he admittedly got out of shape, hurt his knee and wound up on injured reserve.

He ran for 79 yards against the Steelers and 70 against the Falcons — the Eagles' two biggest wins of the year — before fading later in the season.

He said learning how to work through an injury is an important lesson for a young NFL player.

"I’m definitely more equipped in my second year getting hurt than my first year because I dealt with it differently," he said. "I let it get to me a lot and kind of shied away from the game, but this year I got more into the game.

“It was frustrating, but I stayed into the game plan, stayed in my playbook, [and] I didn’t let it get to me. I stayed dialed in. It was frustrating to me, but I know what I can do and I know what I’m capable of. I’m right back out here and I’m ready to go, and I’m full go."

Much has been made of the Eagles' struggles running the ball this preseason.

LeGarrette Blount is averaging 1.9 yards on nine carries, rookie fourth-round pick Donnel Pumphrey has two yards on seven carries, Clement and Byron Marshall are both averaging under 4.0 yards per carry, and Darren Sproles and Smallwood haven't gotten any carries.

As a group, the Eagles' running backs are averaging 2.4 yards per carry.

The Eagles finish the preseason against the Dolphins at the Linc Thursday — the first offense is expected to play into the third quarter — and at the Meadowlands against the Jets, when most starters won't paly.

Smallwood knows people are already questioning the Eagles' running game.

“We sense it, we hear it, but like Doug (Pederson) said, we’re not going to overreact, we’re not going to underreact," he said. "It’s preseason, we’re going to get better at it, we know what we’re capable of doing. We’re not going to let it get to us that much.

“This game is going to be the one where we dial up the run and show how we can run the ball."

And it needs to be the game that Smallwood does the same thing.

“I’m definitely very hungry," he said. "I missed a lot of reps and missed a lot of game reps that could have made me better. So this is my chance to take it and go full throttle.

“It’s the game, man. It’s my welcome home party. I’m back on the field, going to go out there, I'm going to get some plays, I’m going to get some runs, going to get some passes. It’s real important for me."

Smallwood finished last year with a 4.1 rushing average, becoming only the fourth Eagles rookie running back to rush for 300 yards with an average of 4.0 or more in the last 35 years (also Correll Buckhalter, LeSean McCoy and Bryce Brown).

And he felt before the injury he had come a long way from his rookie year.

“I definitely think I took that step," he said. "From last year to this year, I took that leap that I needed, and I think just my running, I was more dialed in, my shoulder pads were getting low, I was running through people instead of trying to run around. I wasn’t thinking so much. I was just playing with confidence.

"Now I’ve just got to do it Thursday night — and every day we’re out here at practice."

Ronald Darby has potential to change how frequent Eagles blitz

Ronald Darby has potential to change how frequent Eagles blitz

The Eagles blitzed early and often during their second exhibition game against the Bills last week, and unlike much of what we see in preseason, it actually could be a sign of what’s to come.

No NFL defense used a standard four-man pass rush with greater frequency than the Eagles in 2016 at 79.3 percent of the time, according to Football Outsiders Almanac. (Conversely, the team that rushed four the fewest was the Jets at 49.2 percent.) This has long been the philosophy of defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz, who prefers to generate pressure from the front four without drawing on help from linebackers and defensive backs.

Schwartz also may have been more hesitant to blitz than usual last season out of fear a weak secondary would not be able to hold up in coverage. Now that the Eagles acquired cornerback Ronald Darby in a trade, the defense may have the freedom to send additional pressure.

“A lot of times, your blitz really depends on how well your corners are going,” Schwartz said Monday after practice (see 10 observations). “The more help you're getting in the corners, obviously, the less guys that you can use to blitz, so they certainly both go hand in hand.”

The Bills game almost certainly does not represent a fundamental shift in Schwartz’s strategy. The Eagles are not expected to go from blitzing the least in the league to sending extra rushers on every other play.

It’s only preseason — a time when coaches are evaluating everything.

“We didn't scheme up, we used more of our scheme,” Schwartz said. “Everything that we ran in that game, we had run 50 times in training camp. It was all sort of base stuff, but there were some different things we were looking at.”

So nothing to see here, right? Maybe, but if nothing else, this goes to show Schwartz is working from a larger playbook than it might have seemed in '16, when the Eagles rigidly sent four rushers down after down.

Having a potential shutdown cornerback in Darby, or at least a competent tandem along with Jalen Mills, could provide the Eagles' defense with the flexibility it sorely lacked last season. It may merely be a matter of getting Darby up to speed in the system, considering his arrival was less than two weeks ago.

“He's pretty close,” Schwartz said. “There are some situations that don't come up very often where he's still maybe a step slow when a safety makes a call, but everything is installed.

“He has it. It's just a matter of repping it enough times that he feels comfortable with it, and we're still a work in progress there.”

Darby impressed in his Eagles debut last Thursday, recording one interception and letting another go through his fingertips (see story). However, the third-year defensive back is coming off of a down season in Buffalo, so it’s not necessarily a given he’ll continue producing at a high level.

In order for Schwartz to feel comfortable with getting creative, Darby must continue to demonstrate not only his individual ability, but that he’s also able to work in concert with the rest of the secondary.

“There is something with a corner and safety communication,” Schwartz said. “The safety is making calls, there’s a lot of moving parts — motion can change a technique the corner makes, and anticipating that motion, and sort of being one step ahead — so it certainly would help a corner to have that.”

Since his arrival, Darby has already changed the complexion of the defense, putting another playmaker in the secondary. The Eagles are making some tweaks to his technique — he’s working with legendary safety Brian Dawkins, and catching balls from the JUGS machine in the hopes of converting more pass breakups into picks.

And if Darby turns out to be everything the Eagles hope, he may even allow the Eagles' defense to get after the quarterback a bit more.