Burke's 2014 Eagles mock draft 3.0

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Burke's 2014 Eagles mock draft 3.0

Between now and the draft, our draft pundits Ron Burke, Chris Steuber, Jared Sherman and Geoff Mosher will provide their latest Eagles mock drafts. They will make selections for each of the Eagles' six picks, and when they update their selections, their new mocks will be posted. 

Round 1, Pick 22: Kyle Fuller, CB, Virginia Tech (6-0/190)
The Eagles make a make a concerted effort to strengthen their secondary for the foreseeable future, and they begin by adding this team captain from Virginia Tech. Fuller may not be ready to step in and start right away, but he possesses the leadership, confidence and toughness to develop into a solid NFL contributor. He is an instinctive player that tries to outthink the receiver, which leads to playmaking opportunities. Does a good job of sticking with receivers while keeping his eyes on the quarterback. He can play zone and man coverage with effectiveness. Fuller does not shy away from contact and he has the size and leaping ability to play bigger receivers.

(Mock 2.0 pick: CB Jason Verrett, TCU)

Round 2, Pick 54: Jordan Matthews, WR, Vanderbilt (6-3/212)
Matthews carried a heavy load in the Vanderbilt offense en route to becoming the SEC’s all-time leader in receptions and receiving yards. Because he was used so heavily, being in a pro offense that demands much of him won’t be a shock to his system. Matthews clocked a 4.46 40-yard dash, but his speed does not jump off the screen. His knack for using his size to create space is one of his better attributes. Even with his glowing resume, Matthews appears to be a player on the upswing and would fit in comfortably as a big-bodied option in an offense that spreads around the ball. Matthews is a cousin of Hall of Fame WR Jerry Rice.

(Mock 2.0 pick: Matthews)

Round 3, Pick 86: Jimmie Ward, S, Northern Illinois (5-11/193)
If it’s a solid football player you want, then Ward fits that description, albeit in a smaller-than-ideal package for the safety position. He is a safety trapped in a cornerback’s body, yet his aggressive style of play rivals that of any player in this class. Ward does not shy away from contact; in fact he seeks it. He plays the game at full speed and is a determined tackler. He could contribute at both safety spots and would be an intriguing choice as a slot corner in certain packages. Ward had seven interceptions in 2013. He often was used to blitz off the edge. A fracture in his foot kept him for working fully at the combine, but he responded with an impressive pro day before scheduled surgery.

(Mock 2.0 pick: DT Daniel McCullers, Tennessee)

Round 4, Pick 122: Christian Kirksey, LB, Iowa (6-2/233)
This is a case of trying to fit a player that’s better suited in a 4-3 defense into a 3-4 defense. Ideally, Kirksey is a 4-3 OLB, however, I am intrigued by his abilities enough to take a shot at having him add weight to play inside. He still could be used in packages that take advantage of his athleticism by allowing him to rush the quarterback. Overall, Kirksey is a sound football player with the movement skills needed to play forward and drop in coverage. At worst, he should be a capable special teams contributor.

(Mock 2.0 pick: FS Terrence Brooks, Florida State)

Round 5, Pick 162: Andrew Jackson, ILB, Western Kentucky (6-1/254)
Built like a fireplug, Jackson is a thumper that in time could man one of the starting inside linebacker positions in the Eagles' 3-4 defense. He does a pretty good job of locating the football and chasing it. Plays a physical game. He was a three-year starter for the Hilltoppers.

(Mock 2.0 pick: Jackson)

Round 7, Pick 237: Shaq Evans, WR, UCLA (6-1/213)
Transferred to UCLA from Notre Dame. Evans is a smooth runner for a receiving corps that needs an infusion of viable weapons. More of a possession receiver than a home run hitter. Evans can make the tough catch, much like the departed Jason Avant, and he has experience as a punt returner.

(Mock 2.0 pick: Evans)

Eagles Injury Update: Mathews and Matthews to return to practice

Eagles Injury Update: Mathews and Matthews to return to practice

If you're searching for some good news following the Eagles' dismal 32-14 loss to the Bengals on Sunday afternoon, here it is. 

Jordan Matthews (ankle) and Ryan Mathews (knee) are going to return to practice this week, head coach Doug Pederson said on Monday. 

Ryan Mathews, who suffered an MCL sprain against Seattle, has missed the last two weeks. The Eagles averaged just 77 yards rushing in those two losses, going with Wendell Smallwood, Darren Sproles and Kenjon Barner. 

Jordan Matthews, who has been the Eagles' best and most consistent receiver this season, suffered an ankle sprain against the Packers and was inactive on Sunday against the Bengals. It was the first game he ever missed in college or in the NFL. 

Wideout Dorial Green-Beckham, who injured his midsection and got X-rays during the game, has an oblique contusion, according to Pederson. Green-Beckham is sore and will be held from practice on Wednesday, but Pederson expects him to be "OK" for the Washington game on Sunday. 

Pederson said right tackle Halapoulivaati Vaitai is "coming along," but isn't yet ready to return. 

"He's going to do a little more this week, not from a practice standpoint but from a rehab standpoint, and he's doing good," Pederson said. "But we'll see where he is again later in the week."

In Vaitai's absence, left guard Allen Barbre has shifted from left guard to right tackle and Stefen Wisniewski has replaced him at left guard. 

Doug Pederson admits 'not everybody' played hard in Eagles' loss

Doug Pederson admits 'not everybody' played hard in Eagles' loss

Doug Pederson’s press conference was humming along as expected on Monday morning, the day after the team’s 32-14 loss to the Bengals in Cincinnati. 

Like he did minutes after the game, Pederson again expressed the idea that the Eagles didn’t lose for lack of effort. 

“I didn’t see any quit in the guys,” he said several different ways throughout the 19-minute session with reporters. 

The effort’s there. There’s no quit. 

Those are the types of responses we’ve become accustomed to hearing from Pederson over the last couple of weeks after embarrassing losses. And it looked like that was how Monday was going to end, with that same message being repeated ad nauseum. 

Until Pederson made a shocking admission. 

Could he honestly say every one of his players played hard against Cincinnati?

“Not everybody,” he said. “Not everybody, and that's the accountability that I talk about. You know, I hold coaches accountable for that. I hold myself accountable for that because it all starts with me and I pride myself each week to make sure the guys are ready to go. 
 
“But at the same time, it comes down to a mentality by each individual player. You know, this is a business where we have to be ready to go every single weekend because every team in the league -- I mean, there's some teams that are better than others, obviously -- but for the most part, anything can happen each weekend.”
 
Not everybody. The admission of that fact is far more shocking than the reality. Fans who watched Sunday’s game will probably be able to pinpoint several plays where one or more Eagles might not have given full effort. 
 
But for a first-year head coach to come out and admit it in public is rare. Perhaps Pederson felt emboldened to say something because he’s been assured of his status within the organization (see story). On Monday, he said he “for sure” thinks his job is secure after this season based on reassurance from Jeff Lurie and Howie Roseman. 
 
While Pederson said it publicly, the conversation between him and his players about accountability will continue. It seems unlikely Pederson will take it a step further by cutting or benching players, but his team will definitely hear the message its head coach put out on Monday. 
 
While Pederson commented that “not everybody” played hard, it seems like he’s convinced that portion of the team is the minority. Overall, he’s still convinced that guys are buying in. The reason he gave was the feedback he’s been getting back from his leadership council (a group of veteran leaders he has depended on throughout the season). 
 
Earlier in the press conference, Pederson was asked about one play in particular, when Zach Ertz failed to block Bengals linebacker Vontaze Burfict as Carson Wentz scrambled for a 10-yard gain in the first quarter. The video shows Ertz making an effort to avoid the linebacker.
 
“Looking at the tape and watching where Carson was scrambling of course he was heading toward out of bounds and I think he just pulled off at that point,” Pederson said. “That’s all I can say. But I’m definitely going to ask him why.”

With a 5-7 record, the Eagles’ playoff chances are all but completely gone, so the last quarter of the season will be about effort, pride and finding out who wants to be back on the team in 2017. 

To end his press conference, Pederson was asked if this Eagles team needs to be “loved up” or if it’s time for some tough love.  

“I think it's both. I think it's both,” he said. “I think there's a level of that tough love. There's got to be that accountability that I was talking about. You know, I implore and I challenge the leaders of the football team to stand up and really not only hold themselves [accountable] but the rest of the team. Listen, it's not a panic move or anything like that, but just, ‘Hey, let's just make sure we're doing things right.’ Everybody just do things right, do their jobs, do their assignments, you know, and good things are going to happen. 

“Obviously, again, it starts with me, and I've got to make sure that I'm doing it right and I'm holding myself accountable, and as you mentioned earlier with Jeffrey and Howie, if they're holding me accountable and all that, that's where it starts, and then I relay that message to the assistants and on to the team.”