Camp Observations: No hesitation, limitations for Maclin

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Camp Observations: No hesitation, limitations for Maclin

He hasn’t missed a rep, hasn’t needed a day off, hasn’t worried that three straight practices in pads would be detrimental to his reconstructed knee.

Each day at Eagles camp, Jeremy Maclin has jogged onto the NovaCare Complex field and practiced as if he didn’t miss the entire 2014 with the second torn knee ligament he’s suffered in his life.

“I didn’t come in here thinking I have any limitations or anything like that,” Maclin said after practice. “The knee has felt fine. It’s held up. I feel great. I’m out here getting better each and every day. That’s all I can ask for.”

More than a year has passed since Maclin ripped his knee up on the practice field, ensuring he would undergo surgery and miss out on Chip Kelly’s promising first year as head coach.

But watching him on the field since the team started practicing Saturday, he’s showing no signs of hesitation or loss of explosion. In one drill Thursday, Maclin faked safety Chris Maragos out of his jock for an easy catch. In another, Maclin made a touch catch over the middle despite tight coverage from safety Malcolm Jenkins.

On another catch, Maclin fought off so much contact from Bradley Fletcher that the referee quickly tossed out the yellow flag.

He’s worked in the slot. He’s worked on the outside. He’s done everything the coaches have asked. He’s also fulfilling his offseason pledge to replace the leadership lost when the team cut Jason Avant. Maclin has stayed on the field after practice to get some extra receptions from the JUGS machine, along with rookies Jordan Matthews and Josh Huff.

Not that this comes as a surprise to him.

“I don't think I necessarily needed confirmation (that I’m 100 percent recovered),” he said. “Maybe you guys do. Like I said, I’ve been feeling fine. I’ve been out here since April 21, continuing to get strong, continuing to get better, just working on my craft.”

Other observations from the fifth day of training camp:

Rising stock
Nolan Carroll, an early camp star, has a knack for getting his hands on the ball. He broke up two more passes, including a sprawling deflection of a Nick Foles pass to Maclin in the end zone. By unofficial tally, Carroll leads the defensive backs in breakups as he continues to push Fletcher for the left cornerback job.

Falling stock
Rough day for Nick Foles and G.J. Kinne. Kinne threw his first pick of camp and Foles was picked off for the second time in as many days, when his underthrown pass over the middle landed in the hands of DeMeco Ryans. Foles also had one of his passes batted down by one of the human flyswatters, which is believed to be the first time he’s ever done that since the obstruction devices first appeared last year.

Mismatch of the day
Tight end Brent Celek lost outside linebacker Brandon Graham in the end zone and reeled in a nice touchdown pass from Foles in red-zone drills.

Trampling of the day
Cary Williams, perhaps eager to back up his comments that he’s as good as any corner in the league (see story), took his wrath out on receiver Jeff Maehl. At the end of a play, Maehl had trouble getting back to his feet -- because Williams was still on top of him and in no hurry to get up.

Catch of the day I
Tiny wideout Damaris Johnson made a diving catch in the back corner of the end zone on a well-placed Matt Barkley toss. Very good effort for the little guy who, up until Wednesday, hadn’t been very impressive.

Catch of the day II
Towering wideout Ifeanyi Momah twisted in midair to reel in a Barkley pass along the left sideline with cornerback Brandon Boykin doing his best to compensate for the nine-inch differential.

Special guest of the day
Former Cowboys wide receiver and Eagles nemesis Michael Irvin, a Hall of Famer, attended camp Thursday on behalf of his current employer, the NFL Network.

Henery vs. Murderleg
Still no clear leader in this kicking competition. In the early afternoon duel, Alex Henery and Carey Spear each went 5 for 5 on attempts of (unofficially) 36, 39, 47, 50 and 52 yards. Later, Henery nailed a 50-yarder, then missed from 33, then hit from 40. Spear dropped in one from 41 yards out but had his 46-yard attempt minutes later rejected by the left goalpost.

Believe the hype?
Matthews, who’s caught everything at camp, ran with the first team early as the Eagles continued to practice without Riley Cooper (foot). Matthews dropped the first two passes thrown to him by Foles and later struggled to get separation against safety Jenkins. Be careful about sky-high expectations for the rookie wideout.

Personnel shuffles
Rookie seventh-rounder Beau Allen, who teammates have raved about since the spring camps, ran at nose tackle frequently on the first-team base defense. The Eagles have worked Bennie Logan and Damion Square mostly on the first team before giving Allen some reps there. Also, Maragos took his turn running alongside Jenkins at safety on the first defense.

Injury update
Cooper (foot), running back Chris Polk (hamstring) and center Julian Vandervelde (back) each missed practice for the second straight day. Safety Earl Wolff, who ran with the first defense Wednesday, was in his pads and helmet but didn’t get many snaps on any team. No word on if he suffered an injury.

Up next
The Eagles practice at 11:45 a.m. Friday at the NovaCare Complex, their last practice before an off day Saturday.

Eagles propose four rules to be considered by NFL next week

Eagles propose four rules to be considered by NFL next week

Next week, when the NFL convenes for its owners meetings in Phoenix, there will be 15 proposed rule changes under consideration by the competition committee. 

While the one proposed rule change would cut regular-season overtime from 15 to 10 minutes (see story), there are 14 others up for discussion. 

Of those 15, seven were submitted by NFL teams. And of those seven, four were submitted by the Eagles

Three of the four rule proposals from the Eagles are safety related. 

Here are the four from the Eagles, per the NFL: 

1. Gives additional protections for long snappers on kick plays. 

2. Prohibits the “leaper” block attempt on field goal and extra point plays. 

3. Expands the “crown of helmet” foul to include “hairline” part of helmet. 

4. Amends the challenge system by granting a third challenge if a club is successful on at least one of its initial two challenges, and expands reviewable plays outside of two minutes of each half.

The first proposed rule would offer long snappers -- Jon Dorenbos included -- some extra protection. It would add this language to Article 6, Unnecessary Roughness: "When a team is in scrimmage kick formation, a defensive player may not initiate contact with the snapper until one second has elapsed after the snap." 

The second proposed rule change is one of the proposals that has garnered the most attention. Basically, the league now allows players to leap over the line of scrimmage on kicks as long as they don't touch anyone. This new rule would completely outlaw the process of leaping over the line. 

It seems like this rule change is likely to happen. The NFLPA has previously asked for this rule to be changed. 

"So the inevitable is going to happen, and just hearing from the players association, Philly now proposing it is really in the best interest of the game," former Eagle and league football operations director Troy Vincent said on a conference call Thursday. 

The next rule does pretty much exactly what it says: it expands the area that is considered to be the "crown of the helmet." 

Here's the new language that would be added to Article 8, Initiating Contact with the Crown of the Helmet: "Lowering the head and making forcible contact with the crown or 'hairline' parts of the helmet against any part of an opponent shall be considered a foul even if the initiating player's head moves after initial contact and the majority of contact occurs with the side or front of the helmet."

Finally, the last proposal isn't a safety one. It's about replay and is pretty self-explanatory for the most part. 

The reasoning given for this rule change on the proposal: "Provides coaches with a greater opportunity to correct subjective officiating errors, but excludes those fouls that have a minimal opportunity for reversal."

NFL owners mull cut of regular-season overtime to 10 minutes

NFL owners mull cut of regular-season overtime to 10 minutes

NEW YORK -- NFL owners will consider proposals next week to cut regular-season overtime from 15 minutes to 10; eliminate players leaping over the line on kick plays; and expansion of coaches' challenges and what can be reviewed by officials.

In what promises to be a busy annual meeting next week in Phoenix that will include discussing the Raiders' potential relocation from Oakland to Las Vegas, the 32 owners also will vote on changing the mechanics on replay reviews and other items intended to reduce downtime during games.

The Eagles proposed four rules changes, including abolishing the leaping techniques that league football operations director Troy Vincent said Thursday "don't belong in the game."

Seattle and Buffalo co-authored a proposal allowing a coach to challenge any officiating decision, whether a foul is called or not.

"That is a significant change to our current replay rule and it is something that will be on the floor and will be debated next week," NFL officiating chief Dean Blandino said.

Another major change would be the reduction of overtime in-season; the extra period in the playoffs would remain at 15 minutes. The powerful competition committee, of which Vincent and Blandino are members, believed it's a player safety issue, noting that number of snaps for games going to OT -- especially deep into the overtime -- is excessive. Especially if a team has a quick turnaround.

"We don't know where a team is going to be playing the next week, it could be four days later," said committee chairman Rich McKay, president of the Atlanta Falcons. "We felt we should put an end to it. We don't think it will lead to more ties. Could it? It could, but we are not concerned with that."

As for changing the format of overtime to ensure both teams always get a possession -- a popular topic after how the Super Bowl ended -- Blandino said the league's wants to keep the element of sudden death in the extra period.

The "leaper rule" has taken some priority among competition committee members, the players' union and coaches. Vincent said coaches have begun scheming how to defense it, which can "create a real safety issue."

"It is really in the best interest of the game" to outlaw leaping on kicks," Vincent added.

McKay noted that the NCAA is in the process of passing a similar ban on the technique.

During the meetings that run from Sunday to Wednesday, the teams will be shown plays the competition committee believes should result in suspensions or ejections. Game officials already have had the leeway to eject players, but it rarely has happened; there were three in 2016.

"They don't happen very often, let's give the players credit," McKay said. "We have 40,000 plays in a year. We'll show a tape that will have four or five plays that would warrant suspension. This is not a widespread situation."

Added Vincent, a former NFL defensive back: "When you see the plays, they are catastrophic. We had two players who did not return for the season. They are high-impact plays that belong out of the game. It will be a real point of emphasis this season."