Cary Williams: Peterson, Revis, Sherman my equals

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Cary Williams: Peterson, Revis, Sherman my equals

Cardinals cornerback Patrick Peterson on Wednesday inked a contract extension that paid out the most guaranteed money for a cornerback in the history of the game. Richard Sherman scored his big payday from the Seahawks in May and Darrelle Revis hit the jackpot (again) in New England shortly after the Bucs released him.

Since the start of the new league year, the consensus top three corners in the game have totaled about $100 million in guaranteed cash.

Eagles cornerback Cary Williams on Wednesday was asked if he felt one of those three should be considered the league’s No. 1 corner over the two others. After first saying, “I don’t care” and later adding that “they deserve the money,” Williams suggested that playoff performance should factor into a corner’s reputation -- and then he conveniently mentioned that he’s won many, many playoff games.

Asked if he’d put himself in their echelon, Williams didn’t mince words.

“Yeah,” Williams said. “No question.”

Williams said great corners “come through in great situations in great games in big-time situations,” which he said he’s done already.

“I look at my career. I’ve played in playoff games,” he said. “Most of those guys haven’t played in playoff games. It is what it is. Hopefully those guys could make it to the playoffs. Hopefully those guys could continue the success that they’ve had in their careers. Much respect to those guys, because I don’t see a much of a difference in any of them.”

His argument that the aforementioned three haven’t played in the postseason applies only to Peterson. (Maybe he also counted Browns cornerback Joe Haden, who recently signed a five-year, $68 million contract with $45 million guaranteed despite no playoff resume.)

Revis, a five-time Pro Bowler and three-time All-Pro, has played in six playoff games with the Jets, who went 4-2 in those games and allowed more than 16 points in just three. Sherman, a two-time All Pro, just won a Super Bowl with Seattle, which is 4-1 in playoff games when Sherman starts.

Williams started for the Ravens in 2012, when they beat San Francisco in the Super Bowl after rallying in the AFC championship to upend Peyton Manning and the Broncos in Denver. He then signed a three-year deal with the Eagles that came with a $5 million signing bonus and $10.5 million guaranteed.

He has played in 11 postseason games and his teams are 7-4 in those games, but he’s never made All-Pro or the Pro Bowl.

Williams wondered why he doesn’t get as much credit as the big three, given that he’s got more postseason wins than any of them.

“I’ve started and haven’t given up a touchdown in any of those playoff games. And my name is never brought up because maybe I’m a seventh-rounder or whatever the case may be,” he said. “I don’t know what it is. It is what it is, because my statistics definitely show I can play this game.

“But at the end of the day it’s not my job to heckle or wonder why I’m not in the top 100 or anything like that. I just play and try to be the best I can possibly be. Those guys are great, those guys are equally as talented and they do what they have to do to get their teams wins.”

Eagles wise to bring Jason Peters back, even with full salary

Eagles wise to bring Jason Peters back, even with full salary

This isn't a big surprise, but Jason Peters will be back with the Eagles — big salary and all — for the 2017 season.

While the Eagles approached the veteran left tackle about his contract in January, Peters has not restructured his deal, according to a league source. 

NFL Network's Ian Rapoport on Thursday morning reported that Peters will be back next season on his normal contract. 

Yes, Peters is expensive in 2017. His base salary after hitting another Pro Bowl escalator written into his contract is up to $10.45 million for next season (plus a $250K workout bonus), which comes with a big cap hit of $11.7 million. That cap hit is the highest on the team, but not outlandish for a high-caliber left tackle. 

The Eagles could have very well cut Peters and moved on. It would have saved them significant cap space to use elsewhere. They just wouldn't have found any player more valuable to pay with that money. 

Peters, 35, is still their best option to protect Carson Wentz's blind side. He made his ninth Pro Bowl in 2016 after playing all 16 games. The team hasn't been shy about wanting him back and Peters toward the end of the season said he wanted to return for another year. 

"We certainly want to have him back," Eagles vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said of Peters in early January.

“I love him. I want him on the team,” head coach Doug Pederson said with two games remaining this past season. “I don’t want him to go anywhere."

With Peters back, it means Lane Johnson's eventual trip to left tackle will be held off for another year. Eventually, he'll take over that spot … just not right now. 

During the season, Peters opened up about his future, saying he hopes Wentz can be the guy who finally gets him a Super Bowl ring (see story).

Eagles Mailbag: Restructuring Barwin, Allen Barbre, Jason Kelce's importance

Eagles Mailbag: Restructuring Barwin, Allen Barbre, Jason Kelce's importance

We answered half of your questions in the first mailbag this week (see story)

But there are plenty more to go. 

With free agency just around the corner, let's not waste any time jumping into today's questions: 

I don't think so. 

Yeah, moving on from Connor Barwin is going to be tough. He's a great guy and has been a tremendous asset in the community. His foundation is amazing. But on the field, his production dropped while his price tag soared. That's a problem. 

Barwin has said publicly that he'd be willing to take a pay cut to stay in Philly. He's a smart guy and knew there's no way the Eagles are going to keep him around with an $8.35 million cap hit, especially when they can save $7.75 million of that if they cut him. ... So maybe they would keep him at a reduced rate. There's logic in that, but it's time to move on. I don't think Barwin would really want to stay for the pay cut it would probably take. 

Right now, Barwin is blocking Vinny Curry from seeing significant playing time. And while Curry didn't have a good year in 2016, he's getting paid a lot, so it's time to see if he can live up to that contract. 

And for Barwin, while he loves Philly and has made this his home, he deserves to be in a defense that fits him better.

I'm a little surprised more haven't come already. To me, this likely means the Eagles are trying to exhaust any trade options first. Why cut a guy if you can get some kind of return, even a late-round or conditional pick? 

There's no real harm in waiting right now, and maybe the team will find a trade partner for one of their players on the chopping block. 

I always like these hypotheticals from Drew. Basically, I'd keep the youngest and most-talented players:

Carson Wentz, Fletcher Cox, Lane Johnson, Jordan Hicks, Malcolm Jenkins. 

Wentz, Cox and Johnson were pretty easy. Then I really struggled. Jenkins is the oldest guy on the list, but he's so important to the team. I left off Brandon Graham and Zach Ertz and Brandon Brooks and Jordan Matthews, which I'm not so sure about. This was harder than I anticipated. 

I guess you're talking about Allen Barbre's hamstring injury. Yeah, barring something I don't know about, he should be completely healed and ready to go. 

Here's something to think about, though: Barbre will be 33 when the 2017 season starts and I wouldn't put him down in pen as the starter at left guard next year. If Jason Kelce is still on the team, he'll be the center, but why not let Isaac Seumalo battle for the left guard job? 

If Seumalo wins the spot, then Barbre is still a relatively inexpensive and really good backup option. 

I honestly think Jason Kelce is better than most fans in this city think. People see him get blown up a few times in a year — really blown up — and think he's an awful player. He's not. No, he can't go 1-on-1 with nose tackles, but he's still great at getting downfield and into the second level. 

And then there's the importance of the center. I don't know exactly how important he is in terms of calling the shots on the line, but he didn't miss a single snap in 2016. I know cutting or trading Kelce would save significant cap space, but I wouldn't do it. The Eagles have shown they'll do whatever it takes to develop Wentz; I think keeping his veteran center for a second year would help.