Cary Williams: Peterson, Revis, Sherman my equals

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Cary Williams: Peterson, Revis, Sherman my equals

Cardinals cornerback Patrick Peterson on Wednesday inked a contract extension that paid out the most guaranteed money for a cornerback in the history of the game. Richard Sherman scored his big payday from the Seahawks in May and Darrelle Revis hit the jackpot (again) in New England shortly after the Bucs released him.

Since the start of the new league year, the consensus top three corners in the game have totaled about $100 million in guaranteed cash.

Eagles cornerback Cary Williams on Wednesday was asked if he felt one of those three should be considered the league’s No. 1 corner over the two others. After first saying, “I don’t care” and later adding that “they deserve the money,” Williams suggested that playoff performance should factor into a corner’s reputation -- and then he conveniently mentioned that he’s won many, many playoff games.

Asked if he’d put himself in their echelon, Williams didn’t mince words.

“Yeah,” Williams said. “No question.”

Williams said great corners “come through in great situations in great games in big-time situations,” which he said he’s done already.

“I look at my career. I’ve played in playoff games,” he said. “Most of those guys haven’t played in playoff games. It is what it is. Hopefully those guys could make it to the playoffs. Hopefully those guys could continue the success that they’ve had in their careers. Much respect to those guys, because I don’t see a much of a difference in any of them.”

His argument that the aforementioned three haven’t played in the postseason applies only to Peterson. (Maybe he also counted Browns cornerback Joe Haden, who recently signed a five-year, $68 million contract with $45 million guaranteed despite no playoff resume.)

Revis, a five-time Pro Bowler and three-time All-Pro, has played in six playoff games with the Jets, who went 4-2 in those games and allowed more than 16 points in just three. Sherman, a two-time All Pro, just won a Super Bowl with Seattle, which is 4-1 in playoff games when Sherman starts.

Williams started for the Ravens in 2012, when they beat San Francisco in the Super Bowl after rallying in the AFC championship to upend Peyton Manning and the Broncos in Denver. He then signed a three-year deal with the Eagles that came with a $5 million signing bonus and $10.5 million guaranteed.

He has played in 11 postseason games and his teams are 7-4 in those games, but he’s never made All-Pro or the Pro Bowl.

Williams wondered why he doesn’t get as much credit as the big three, given that he’s got more postseason wins than any of them.

“I’ve started and haven’t given up a touchdown in any of those playoff games. And my name is never brought up because maybe I’m a seventh-rounder or whatever the case may be,” he said. “I don’t know what it is. It is what it is, because my statistics definitely show I can play this game.

“But at the end of the day it’s not my job to heckle or wonder why I’m not in the top 100 or anything like that. I just play and try to be the best I can possibly be. Those guys are great, those guys are equally as talented and they do what they have to do to get their teams wins.”

2017 NFL draft prospect watch: Corey Davis, James Washington, Courtland Sutton

2017 NFL draft prospect watch: Corey Davis, James Washington, Courtland Sutton

We lead this prospect watch with what else but wide receivers to help Eagles rookie phenom Carson Wentz.

We also look at an offensive lineman to help protect Wentz, a corner that could help Jim Schwartz's defense, and a local running back getting lost in a deep class.

Here are six players to watch on Saturday:

Corey Davis, senior WR, Western Michigan (6-3/213)
Davis' stock is skyrocketing and deservedly so. This kid can play. He's put up 24 catches for 395 yards and four touchdowns in four games. He'll take on Central Michigan, who took down Oklahoma State earlier this season. Watching Davis for the first hour of that game will be a nice appetizer before some of the bigger matchups.

Western Michigan at Central Michigan, 7 p.m.

James Washington, junior WR, Oklahoma State (6-1/205)
I profiled Washington earlier this week and now he'll get some decent competition against No. 22 Texas. He had a monster game against Pitt a couple weeks ago (9 catches, 296 yards, two TDs), but has lacked consistency overall this season.

Oklahoma State vs. No. 22 Texas, 12 p.m.

Courtland Sutton, redshirt sophomore WR, SMU, (6-4/215)
A tight end in high school, Sutton's speed was too great to keep playing that position. A redshirt sophomore, Sutton is averaging 24.9 yards a catch with four touchdowns this season. He'll be in our own backyard this Saturday afternoon when he takes on Temple at the Linc.

SMU at Temple, 12 p.m.

Chad Wheeler, senior OT, USC (6-6/310)
Wheeler's issues have nothing to do with his ability. He's a stud with great size and above average athleticism. But the massive left tackle has had issues off the field and with injuries. He should dominate against Arizona State on Saturday night.

USC vs. Arizona State, 8:30 p.m.

Cordrea Tankersley, senior CB, Clemson (6-1/200)
Tankersley could've joined the seven Clemson defenders that jumped to the NFL, but he decided to come back after having a strong junior campaign (19 passed defended, five picks). Tankerlsey has ideal NFL size and above average ball skills. His speed, which isn't quite elite level, will be tested against Heisman favorite Lamar Jackson and his speedy receivers.

No. 5 Clemson vs. No. 3 Louisville, 8 p.m.

Corey Clement, senior RB, Wisconsin (5-11/227)
The Glassboro, New Jersey native has been hampered by injuries but did manage to score two touchdowns in Wisconsin's upset of No. 17 Michigan State last week. With this running back class being so deep, Clement could be a sleeper that gets lost in the shuffle. He'll have a tall task competing against No. 4 Michigan on the road.

No. 8 Wisconsin at No. 4 Michigan, 3:30 p.m.

Eagles mailbag: Carson Wentz's skill, running backs, center spot

Eagles mailbag: Carson Wentz's skill, running backs, center spot

The NFL found a way to prevent the Eagles from winning this weekend: Don't let them play. 

Yup, the Eagles are riding high at 3-0, but an early Week 4 bye has them waiting to play again until Oct. 9 in Detroit against the Lions. 

Thanks to a hot start from rookie Carson Wentz and the defense, the Eagles have been one of the biggest surprises of the NFL so far and have Philadelphia buzzing. 

As always, thanks for your questions. We'll dive right in: 

Wentz's ability to extend plays doesn't make his receivers better, but it certainly gives them more opportunities, which is really just as good. 

This skill is something Wentz really takes pride in. He wants his receivers to know that no matter how broken the play is, it isn't dead until the whistle. In that regard, the comparisons to Ben Roethlisberger and Aaron Rodgers make plenty of sense. And his receivers love the idea of having extra seconds to get open. 

During the Chicago game, Wentz really showed this ability. He showed he can move around and out of the pocket while also keeping his eyes downfield. It was just a matter of time before he hit big on one of those plays. 

Sure enough, he did it in the third quarter against the Steelers. I broke down that play using the tape and it showed a unique skill set out of a quarterback (see story)

https://twitter.com/faux_micahGreg/status/781171954241851392

We had a few questions about running backs, so we'll let this one speak for them all. 

On Monday, Doug Pederson said that once Ryan Mathews ankle is completely healed, Mathews is still the lead back who will get most of the team's carries. I think Pederson means it. 

Still, Mathews has had injury problems for a long time and it looks like this year is no different. It had to be encouraging for the Eagles to see how well Kenjon Barner and Wendell Smallwood played against the Steelers. While Mathews is averaging just 3.2 yards per carry, Barner is at 6.1 and Smallwood is at 4.8. 

Sproles, who has 19 carries this year, shouldn't be getting as many carries as he has, but he's still going to get some. He's averaging just 2.7 yards per attempt.

That's a long answer to say this: For now, Mathews is the guy. But if he can't stay healthy, one of the other guys could and should earn more carries. 

https://twitter.com/ATONAMIS317/status/781174071400755200

I thought Stefen Wisniewski looked OK in camp as the primary backup at right guard. 

Sure, Jason Kelce hasn't looked like a Pro Bowler in 2016, but he might not be as bad as you think. Here's Andrew Kulp's film breakdown of Kelce from the Bears game, where to the casual observer, it looked like Kelce got worked (see story). We see Kelce looks bad when he's asked to block a nose tackle 1-on-1. That's never been his strength and never will be his strength. His strength is getting to the next level to block and use his athleticism. 

One more reason to not expect a change at center unless things start to go really bad is that Kelce has been really good for Wentz. Sure, there was a bad snap against the Steelers (something Wisniewski has had his troubles with) but Kelce is a veteran and has helped the rookie out plenty during the first three weeks. 

And besides, with Lane Johnson's suspension looming, the Eagles are likely going to use Wisniewski to fill it at left guard. They could put him at center and Isaac Seumalo at LG, but that would be a pretty big offensive line shakeup for a team that hasn't yet lost a game.