Dalton deal clears path for Nick Foles' big payday

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Dalton deal clears path for Nick Foles' big payday

For the second time since the start of the new league season, an NFL quarterback inked a filthy-rich contract extension that can directly impact the value of the deal Nick Foles can sign next offseason.

And for the second time, Foles essentially yawned and shrugged.

The Bengals and fourth-year quarterback Andy Dalton reached an agreement Monday on a blockbuster six-year deal. Reports vary on the total money, but they indicate a total that can be in excess of $95 million.

In June, 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick signed an extension that could be worth more than $125 million.

Foles, who will be eligible for an extension after this year, insisted Monday that he’s not focused on dollars down the road.

“Like we were talking about earlier, I'm really happy for Andy, I think he's a great quarterback and well-deserved,” Foles said. “But I don't worry about it. When I’m on the field, that doesn't matter. My job is to do what I can to help us be a successful football team, so at the end of the day we'll see what happens.”

Per rules of the CBA, drafted players can’t sign extensions until after the completion of their third season. Kaepernick and Dalton were each second-round picks from the 2011 draft.

Foles, a third-round pick in 2012, will make $635,000 this season in base salary and workout bonus. Next year, he’ll make $680,000 if he’s on the roster unless he and the team negotiate a long-term contract.

Kaepernick and Dalton each signed “pay as you go” deals, which are structured to dole out big money in the signing bonus and first year of the extension but give the team flexibility for the long term. They’re loaded with incentives that can reap even more money if the player performs at a high level and if the team makes deep postseason runs.

Dalton reportedly gets $17 million upon signing and $5 million more in March to go along with his $986,000 base salary in 2014. He has a $4 million roster bonus next year along with a $3 million base salary, both of which he’ll likely see even if he struggles this year. But the Bengals can move on from Dalton in 2016 without a crippling cap hit if Dalton fails to perform.

So that’s $29 million over the next two seasons for Dalton, who made the Pro Bowl as a rookie but hasn’t since. He’s had just one 4,000-yard passing season and hasn’t won a game in three trips to the playoffs. In his three postseason games, Dalton has completed 57 percent of his passes and compiled a 56.2 passer rating.

Dalton has a career 60.9 completion percentage and 85.7 passer rating, which are both worse than Foles’ career averages, albeit Dalton has 1,630 career pass attempts to Foles’ 582. Foles has completed 62.5 percent of his passes and has a career passer rating of 101.

If Foles comes close to duplicating his 2013 season and wins a playoff game or two this year, he can expect to cash in with a contract that blows Dalton’s away and mirrors the haul Kaepernick got from San Francisco.

But it couldn’t be further from his mind.

“It's a blessing to play this game. I'm never worried about that,” he said. “I always know that if you just take care of business and take care of business each and every other day the rest will take care of itself and you'll be taken care of. I'm really happy for Andy and I'm happy for Colin, those guys have done a great job. As a player, I just need to continue to excel on the field, and that's it."

Roob's 25 Random Points: NFL draft edition

Roob's 25 Random Points: NFL draft edition

This isn't an entirely random 25 Random Points because we are three days away from the NFL draft, so it's kind of top-heavy in random draft thoughts.

But there's also the usual nonsense about regional rail, parallel parking, pro bowling, the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame and the best live band in Philly.

Sorry if this one isn't quite random enough. I promise the next one will be far more pointless! 

1. There's a chance the Eagles will select a defensive end in the first round of this year's draft and if they do there's a chance he'll be a terrific, productive player. Historically? That hasn't been the case. In fact, no team in NFL history has been worse drafting defensive ends. Nobody. Let's start with this: In the last 30 years, there have been only 11 defensive ends league-wide who were drafted in the first round and never recorded more than four sacks. Only one team has drafted more than one of those 11 and that's the Eagles, who drafted three of them: Jon Harris in 1997, Jerome McDougle in 2003 and Marcus Smith in 2014. Now, Smith is still active and can add to his total if he makes the roster. But four sacks in three years doesn't augur well for the future.

2. Now consider this: Since sacks became an official NFL stat in 1982, the Eagles have selected nine defensive ends in the first three rounds of the draft. Those nine players have averaged 3.4 sacks per season in an Eagles uniform. Yep. Fewer than 3 1/2 sacks per season! Who has the highest average of the group? None other than the unfairly maligned Mike Mamula, who had 31 1/2 sacks in five seasons as an Eagle -- 6.3 per season. Nobody else is close: Brandon Graham (4.1 sacks per season), Vinny Curry (3.8), Derrick Burgess (2.8), Greg Jefferson (2.7), Victor Abiamiri (1.3), Daniel Te'o-Nesheim (1.0), Jerome McDougle (1.0), Jon Harris (1.0). 

So of the nine defensive ends the Eagles have drafted in the first three rounds, Mamula has been, by far, the most productive. And six averaged fewer than 3.0 sacks a season in an Eagles uniform. And I didn't even include Chris Gocong, a college defensive end who the Eagles converted to linebacker. It's really hard to be this bad at something!

3. Everybody loves mock drafts. They're so popular now that many analysts do multiple versions of the first round and then they keep "updating" their mocks as the draft gets closer. Which makes me wonder what the purpose of those earlier mock drafts is. You're basically saying ... 'OK, this is completely wrong and I'm going to fix it soon, but I'm going to throw it out there anyway because OMG IT'S A MOCK DRAFT. And then I'm going to change it next week and throw it out there again and more people will read it because OMG IT'S A MOCK DRAFT! And it will be completely wrong again.' People love reading mock drafts even though deep down they understand they're meaningless!

4. It also cracks me up when analysts breathlessly claim that a player is DROPPING DOWN THE DRAFT BOARD or SHOOTING UP THE DRAFT BOARD. Actually, they're really not. There is often a perception of players rising and falling, but most of the time it's not really happening. NFL teams set their boards based on a lot of information, most of which the public never sees. When bits of that information leak out, then that's reflected in mock drafts, and you have the illusion of players rising and falling. But in reality, teams have already set a value for that player. So he's not really rising or falling at all. Mock drafts just THINK he is. Now, if a player gets hurt in his pro day, yeah, that will affect his actual status. But those are the exceptions. Most of the time you hear people talking about a player "shooting up the draft board" or "plunging down the board?" Not really happening. It's all an illusion!

5. All that said, I feel like the first couple days of the draft are the most revealing time of the season for NFL teams because it's the one point where they really tip their hand about what they like about their roster and what they don't like. For 363 days, NFL coaches and executives tell you they love everybody on their team. For a couple days in April, they can't hide the truth any longer. That's when we truly learn what they are thinking.

6. I love a good train trestle.

7. My top 20 Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame omissions: 1. Todd Rundgren, 2. Warren Zevon, 3. The Monkees, 4. Dire Straits, 5. Kate Bush, 6. The B-52's, 7. Roxy Music, 8. Bon Jovi, 9. Cheap Trick, 10. The Replacements, 11. T. Rex, 12. Guided by Voices, 13. The Smiths, 14. Jethro Tull, 15. Television, 16. Three Dog Night, 17. The Cars, 18. Big Star, 19. Iron Maiden, 20. Gentle Giant.

8. Who do I want at No. 14? Let's say Gareon Conley, John Ross, Corey Davis, Dalvin Cook, Christian McCaffrey, Jabrill Peppers, Derek Barnett, Charles Harris and Reuben Foster are all on the board. That won't be the case, but let's say they are. What direction would you go? There's no right or wrong answer. You can make a good case for any of those guys. We know the Eagles are desperate for pass rush help. We know they desperately need corners and a running back. But for me, it's all about weapons for Carson Wentz, and there's no guarantee Alshon Jeffery or Torrey Smith will be here beyond this year. So a young, play-making wideout is at the top of my list. Someone Wentz can grow with for the next several years. It comes to whether you like Ross or Davis better. Ross is obviously faster, but Davis is a big, tough, strong, smart, physical kid who has pretty good speed of his own. If I were making the pick? I'm going with Davis.

9. What about cornerback? The class is so deep the Eagles should be able to get some help in the later rounds. There could be four or five corners taken in the first round, and since there are teams that don't need corners, it will push quality guys into the second, third and even fourth rounds. Remember, Eric Allen? Second round. Sheldon Brown? Second round. Bobby Taylor? Second round. The Eagles have five of the first 139 picks and I would be fine using two of them on corners.

10. Speaking of corner ... I haven't given up on the notion of Jalen Mills as a potential starter. I know he doesn't have world-class speed, but, man, I like the way he plays. He's tough, he's aggressive, he doesn't back down, he's got that LSU swagger. Yeah, he got beat deep too many times last year, but tell me a rookie cornerback who doesn't get beat. Every time he kept his head up and kept fighting. Mills battled some pretty darn good wide receivers last year and held his own much of the time. Is he best-suited to be a slot or a third corner? Maybe. But I want to at least give him a shot in training camp. I like his game, and I think he has a chance to be a player.

11. OK, if you're at a restaurant and you're on the phone, don't eat. And if you're eating, don't use the phone. M'kay?

12. It's amazing how many bad quarterbacks the Eagles have had in their history. Did you know only four QBs in Eagles history have won more than 20 games as a starter? Donovan (92), Jaws (69), Randall (63) and Norm Snead (28). And only six have won at least 10 games and have a winning record: McNabb (92-49-1), Jaws (69-67-1), Randall (63-43-1), Norm Van Brocklin (19-16-1), Nick Foles (15-9) and Rodney Peete (15-9). Only McNabb, Jaws and Tommy Thompson in the 1940s have won more than one playoff game. Carson Wentz needs 22 wins to become the fourth-winningest QB in franchise history. Which is sad.

13. If you wanted to, you could take local rail from Newark, Del., to New Haven, Conn. I have this all figured out. If you took a 6:22 a.m. SEPTA train from Newark you would get to Market East at 7:46 a.m. and connect to a Trenton train at 7:51 a.m., arriving in Trenton at 8:54 a.m. Then you would cross the platform and take the north-bound 9:21 a.m. New Jersey Transit train, arriving at Penn Station at 10:35 a.m. After a quick subway ride up to Grand Central via the 1-2-3 train and the S shuttle (or 7 train), you would jump on the 11:34 a.m. Metro North train, arriving in New Haven at 1:26 p.m. Voila, Newark to New Haven in only seven hours! Matter of fact, other than two segments -- New Haven to Providence and Perryville, Md., to Newark, Del. -- you could take local rail from Fredericksburg, Va., to Newburyport, Mass. If you really wanted to.

14. I remember sitting there in the media room in the basement of the Vet in April of 1988 thinking the Eagles really screwed up taking Keith Jackson with the 13th pick. Jackson had caught only 13 passes for 358 yards his senior year at Oklahoma and averaged just 16 catches for 390 yards in four years with the Sooners. He wasn't considered a good blocker and he never caught many passes. Jackson of course went on to earn first-team All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors in each of his first three seasons with the Eagles and averaged 61 catches for 689 yards and five TDs in his all-too-brief four-year stint with the Eagles.  

15. Two years later, the Eagles drafted Illinois wide receiver Mike Bellamy in the second round, and I was convinced he was the next Mike Quick. He was smooth, polished, productive. And never caught a pass as an Eagle. I think Jackson and Bellamy are the two Eagles draft picks over the years I was most wrong about.

16. The point being we all have our opinions on the draft, but you really don't know for a year or two what kind of draft a team really had. Consider the Eagles' 1986 draft. Nobody knew at the time, but the Eagles drafted two of the best players in franchise history 25 picks apart in rounds that don't even exist anymore -- Seth Joyner in the eighth round and Clyde Simmons in the ninth round. Joyner was released on final cuts and returned home to Pearl River, N.Y., before rejoining the Eagles. He didn't become a star until his third year. Simmons didn't have his first double-digit sack season until his fourth year. But Joyner went on to become the only player in NFL history with 50 sacks and 25 interceptions, and Simmons ranked 10th in NFL history with 121 sacks at the point he retired after the 1999 season (behind eight Hall of Famers and Leslie O'Neal). That was one of the greatest drafts in Eagles history. But nobody knew it for years.

17. Sometimes I feel like people are underestimating the Eagles' defense. Let's not forget they ranked 12th in the NFL last year, held quarterbacks to the fifth-lowest completion percentage in the NFL, allowed the fifth-fewest first downs, allowed the eighth-fewest touchdowns and ranked third in the red zone. All this under a first-year defensive coordinator and rookie head coach. Now, they also ranked last in the NFL allowing big plays. Which is why they're focusing on corner and pass rush. But they have tools to work with. It's not a total rebuild at all. They underachieved up front last year, but they're still solid on the defensive line, linebacker and safety. If they figure cornerback out, there's absolutely no reason this can't be a top-10 defense in 2017.

18. I don't get why the Google maps app on my phone always tries to direct me to a random place on the other side of the world when I ask for directions. If I just type "drug store," it will try to send me to a drug store in Venkatanarasimharajuvaripeta, India. If I type "gas station," it will try to send me to a gas station in Mamungkukumpurangkuntjunya, Australia. Dude. I'm in Philly. I've also learned that screaming at my cell phone doesn't help.

19. Crazy that 18 of the Eagles' last 24 first-round picks have been linemen. That goes back to 1991! The only players they've taken in the first round the last 26 years are quarterbacks Donovan McNabb and Carson Wentz; wide receivers Jeremy Maclin, Freddie Mitchell and Nelson Agholor; and cornerback Lito Sheppard. If the Eagles take a non-lineman this year at No. 14, it'll be the first time since 1982 through 1984 they haven't taken a lineman in the first round for three straight years. They drafted Mike Quick, Michael Haddix and Kenny Jackson in the first round those years.

20. All of which means Lito is the only defensive player who wasn't a lineman the Eagles have drafted in the first round since Ben Smith in 1990!

21. Is there something seriously wrong with me if I pump my fist a few times and scream, "AWWW YEAH," after a particularly good parallel parking job?

22. Best live local band from Philly is Sheer Mag.

23. It's not "sampling." It's stealing.

24. I'll be surprised if Wentz doesn't throw at least five more touchdowns and five fewer interceptions in 2017 than he did in 2016 (16 TDs, 14 INTs). How does 23 touchdowns and nine interceptions sound?

25. I was in a restaurant the other day and they had pro bowling on the big-screen TV. Turns out it was a big match between the New York Kingpins and the Philadelphia Hitmen. Did you know we have a pro bowling team? Go Hitmen?

2017 NFL draft positional breakdown: Defensive backs

2017 NFL draft positional breakdown: Defensive backs

We continue our positional breakdown leading up to the 2017 NFL draft with a look at defensive backs. Instead of a top 5, we'll highlight players at these positions who fit the Eagles and have a chance to be available when the team picks. 

We've already looked at running backs, linebackers, quarterbacks, offensive linemen, defensive ends and defensive tackles

At No. 14

Marlon Humphrey, Alabama, 6-0, 197 pounds
Opinions are really split on Humphrey. Some see him as one of the top guys in the cornerback class, while others aren't sure his ball skills will improve enough. The one thing that shouldn't be questioned about Humphrey is his physicality. If the Eagles want a corner that will jam at the line and isn't afraid to use his body, it's Humphrey. 

While Humphrey is a skilled tackler from the cornerback position, it's fair to wonder how much the Eagles (or any team) should care about that. The big question about Humphrey is his ability to track balls and his ability to bring them in. That's a big part of being a corner. 

Tre'Davious White, LSU, 5-11, 192 pounds
While Humphrey is the physical corner with less-than-stellar ball skills, White is kind of the opposite. He's an absolute ball-hawk, but can't tackle. Really, though, that might be a more desirable flaw to have for a cornerback. 

At LSU, White wore the No. 18, which is reserved for the player that represents the school best on and off the field. Bennie Logan once wore 18 at LSU. The question with White has centered around his ceiling. He might be ready to step in and play right away, but some question his ability to ever become one of the best in the business. 

Gareon Conley, Ohio State, 6-0, 195 pounds
Playing on the other side of Marshon Lattimore put Conley in the shadows for a while, but he's out now. It's no secret that Conley's a first-round pick and might not even be around when the Eagles pick at 14. He's really risen up the draft boards of analysts and has had a rise like his former teammate Eli Apple, who went 10th overall last year. 

Conley might appeal to the Eagles for a few reasons, including his cover skills and ability to press. He had a good showing at the combine, which simply matched his production all season. Many folks think he has the potential to be great. 

In the middle 

Cameron Sutton, Tennessee, 5-11, 188 pounds
The Eagles look for versatility and Sutton offers that. He's listed by most places as a corner but can play safety and even did so during Senior Bowl week in Mobile, Alabama. The idea of him playing safety is a little odd just because he lacked the ability to jam consistently at the line. Likely a Day 2 pick. 

Corn Elder, Miami, 5-10, 183 pounds
A little undersized but a skilled corner. His best fit at the next level is probably as a slot guy, but that's not a reason to pass on him. With how often teams are out of base packages, a guy like Elder can play a big role at the next level. More likely a Day 3 pick. 

Late-round sleeper(s)

Montae Nicholson, Michigan State, 6-2, 212 pounds
The big safety had a great showing at the combine in March, which definitely turned some heads. He ran a 4.42 and tested well in other areas. A late-round pick who might not be able to step on the field on defense just yet but could be a force on special teams.