Eagles Mailbag: Receiver solutions, linebackers, free agency

Eagles Mailbag: Receiver solutions, linebackers, free agency

Other teams are still playing and there are still months before free agency and the draft, but the NFL never sleeps. 

You have questions, we make up answers. 

Let's hop into this week's first mailbag: 

There are a few guys who would be good picks in the first round with that 14th or 15th pick. Mike Williams (Clemson), Corey Davis (Western Michigan) and John Ross (Washington) are considered the top three by most.

Ross is an interesting name because he's a lot like DeSean Jackson — a sub-6-foot burner who can deliver on deep balls. The other two are 6-3. 

There will be some options in the second round, too. If JuJu Smith-Schuster (USC) falls or if Cooper Kupp (Eastern Washington) is still there, either would be a fine pick for good value. 

This kind of works with the first question, so we'll go back to back. I think they try to fix the receiver position through the draft and in free agency. That's how much help they need there. 

Remember, Howie Roseman put everything into getting a franchise quarterback in Carson Wentz last offseason. So it would be crazy for the Eagles to not give him some help. Wentz's biggest weapons in 2016 were Zach Ertz and Jordan Matthews. He needs a big-time weapon on the outside. 

If you're looking at free agents, there are plenty of options, but the Eagles don't have a lot of cap room. Everyone's going to talk about Jackson, but aside from him, there's Kenny Britt and Kamar Aiken. They're a couple years younger than Jackson, which would allow Wentz to grow with them some. Britt is a big receiver and Aiken has the ability to play inside and outside. Either would help upgrade what they have. Among those two, Britt will cost more money. 

On the list of needs the Eagles have, linebacker isn't near the top of the list for me. There's receiver, cornerback, running back and edge rusher, so linebacker isn't up there. 

The Eagles were very fortunate this season to have Jordan Hicks and Nigel Bradham on the field for most of it. Bradham has just one year left on his contract, and it might make sense to figure out a new contract with him. He's had his issues off the field but formed a nice duo with Hicks. 

And Joe Walker was just a seventh-round pick last year and suffered an ACL tear, but the team really liked him last training camp. He'll have a chance to return from injury and be the team's backup MIKE linebacker in 2017. 

So maybe the Eagles use a mid- or late-round pick on a linebacker, but if I was running the show, I wouldn't make it the biggest priority. 

Free agency starts at 4 p.m. on March 9. The legal tampering window begins on March 7. That's when teams can talk to soon-to-be free agents but can't agree to deals yet. 

The Eagles will have nine free agents. Take a look at them here

I think the Eagles need to sign a receiver. Maybe not a top of the line one, but not a bottom of the barrel either. They need to get someone they're confident will make them better there, not take a chance on a draft pick. It would just be unfair and cruel to Wentz to not offer him some immediate help. 

NFL Notes: Raiders reward Derek Carr with record $125 million deal

NFL Notes: Raiders reward Derek Carr with record $125 million deal

ALAMEDA, Calif. -- Derek Carr and general manager Reggie McKenzie never doubted the two sides could reach a long-term contract agreement to keep the quarterback with the Raiders before Carr's self-imposed training camp deadline.

Carr was open about how much he wanted to spend his entire career with the organization and after a decade searching for a franchise quarterback the Raiders weren't about to let a player they drafted and developed leave just as he was becoming a star.

So the two sides were able to agree on a five-year, $125 million extension that makes Carr the NFL's richest player, at least temporarily, and won't hinder the team's ability to give its other young stars like AP Defensive Player of the Year Khalil Mack, receiver Amari Cooper and guard Gabe Jackson new contracts before they hit free agency.

"I think that both sides wanted it to get done," Carr said Friday. "It was two family members just figuring out how to get along, and we did. We figured out a way to do it so that we have the opportunity to sign the other guys that I think are important to this organization. That was really important to me, not just to take every single dime that we could."

Carr will still get plenty. The $25 million per year in new money is the richest contract ever in the NFL, beating out the $24.8 million a year Andrew Luck got from Indianapolis. That could be surpassed with Detroit's Matthew Stafford and Washington's Kirk Cousins in line for new deals soon.

But Carr is not worried about that and the Raiders are pleased to have the face of their franchise under contract through 2022 as they prepare to move to Las Vegas in 2020.

"From the outset, both sides wanted the deal done, and I felt our guys did a great job getting together and hammering it out," McKenzie said. "We both wanted the same thing. That part was easy. We could tell that Derek wanted to be here. And we let him know, without a doubt, that we wanted him here" (see full story).

NFL: Prosecutors appeal Hernandez's voided murder conviction
BOSTON -- Massachusetts prosecutors on Friday appealed a court ruling that erased former NFL star Aaron Hernandez's murder conviction in the 2013 killing of a semi-professional football player.

Hernandez's conviction in the fatal shooting of Odin Lloyd was voided after the former New England Patriots player killed himself in prison. Under a long-held Massachusetts legal principle, courts typically erase the convictions of defendants who die before their direct appeals can be heard.

Bristol District Attorney Thomas Quinn III filed an appeal with a single justice of the Supreme Judicial Court on Friday. He called the rule "archaic" and said it "does not serve the public interest."

"A defendant who commits suicide should not be able to manipulate the outcome of his post-conviction proceedings to achieve in death what he would not be able to achieve in life," Quinn said.

Hernandez's appellate attorneys, John Thompson and Linda Thompson, could not immediately be reached for comment. A message was left at their office in Springfield.

Hernandez took his own life in April days after he was acquitted in a separate, 2012 double slaying in Boston.

The legal principle known as abatement ab initio, or "from the beginning," holds that a conviction should not be considered final until an appeal in the criminal case can determine whether mistakes were made that deprived the defendant of a fair trial.

In their appeal Friday, prosecutors argue that some states have moved away from automatically erasing convictions when defendants die before appeals can be heard. More than a dozen states allow appeals to continue even after death and only dismiss convictions when the appellate court finds that a new trial would have been warranted.

Prosecutors said courts should strike a balance between the rights of defendants and the rights of victims. Lloyd's mother fought back tears after a judge voided Hernandez's conviction in her son's killing.

Michael Vick's father arrested on drug-ring charges

Michael Vick's father arrested on drug-ring charges

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. — The father of former pro-football star Michael Vick has been arrested on charges of being involved in a drug ring.

The Virginian-Pilot reports that federal authorities arrested 55-year-old Michael Dwayne Boddie on Thursday. A federal indictment unsealed Wednesday in Newport News alleges that he and 11 others conspired to sell heroin.

Boddie is being held without bond until a Monday detention hearing. He was assigned a court-appointed attorney.

Lawrence Woodward, an attorney who's represented both men over the years, did not respond to requests for comment. The federal prosecutor's office declined to comment on the case beyond the charges.

Vick rose to stardom with the Atlanta Falcons before serving prison time for running a dogfighting operation. He played for the Eagles, Jets and Steelers before announcing his retirement in February.