Hudrick's 2017 NFL mock draft 1.0: Eagles get potential shutdown corner

Hudrick's 2017 NFL mock draft 1.0: Eagles get potential shutdown corner

Super Bowl Sunday is upon us, which means the 2017 NFL draft is right around the corner. The Eagles will either hold the No. 14 or 15 overall pick (the pick will be decided via coin flip) thanks to their trade with the Minnesota Vikings for quarterback Sam Bradford. Here is Paul Hudrick's mock draft 1.0 to get you ready for the 2017 NFL draft, which takes place April 27-29 in Philadelphia.

*Denotes junior
** Denotes redshirt sophomore

1. Cleveland Browns - *DE Myles Garrett, Texas A&M, 6-5/270
Garrett is going to be a disruptive player in the NFL for a long time. He should fit just fine in Gregg Williams' 4-3 scheme.

2. San Francisco 49ers - DE Jonathan Allen, Alabama, 6-3/291
If Allen had come out as a junior last season — like Garrett this year — he likely would've been picked in the teens. Allen gives the 49ers another young, talented piece in their front seven. New GM John Lynch will opt for defense and look to get new head coach Kyle Shanahan a veteran quarterback.

3. Chicago Bears - *QB Mitch Trubisky, North Carolina, 6-3/220
Trubisky has the best arm talent of any quarterback in the draft. Then again, the arm talent of the current Bears’ quarterback has never been questioned. Trubisky’s tools will be too much for the Bears to pass up.

4. Jacksonville Jaguars - *RB Leonard Fournette, LSU, 6-1/235
Fournette has the best strength and speed combo I've seen since Adrian Peterson. He battled a nagging ankle sprain all season, but when he did play, he was scary. He'll add a dynamic playmaker and a physical aspect to the Jaguars' offense.

5. Tennessee Titans - **CB Marshon Lattimore, Ohio State, 6-1/192
Lattimore has elite size and athleticism. Jason McCourty has one year left on his deal and there's not a ton of depth at that position. Lattimore has the potential to become a No. 1 corner.

6. New York Jets - *S Jamal Adams, LSU, 6-1/213
Calvin Pryor has struggled. So has the entire Jets' secondary. Enter Jamal Adams, a special safety with the ability to disrupt against the run and the pass. The best part of his game is his calmness. He dissects plays and plays under control.

7. Los Angeles Chargers - **S Malik Hooker, Ohio State, 6-2/205
Hooker is an elite centerfielder with crazy range and ball skills. He's been compared to future HOF safety Ed Reed. He adds to a Chargers defense that could be a decent unit if healthy. 

8. Carolina Panthers - *DE Derek Barnett, Tennessee, 6-3/265
After Garrett, Barnett is probably the best pure pass rusher in this draft. The Panthers desperately need a strong outside rusher to complement their depth at tackle and linebacker.

9. Cincinnati Bengals - LB Reuben Foster, Alabama, 6-1/228
A pick that just makes a ton of sense. Foster has been (fairly) compared to the Panthers' Luke Kuechly. He forms a scary tandem with Vontaze Burfict playing on the weakside.

10. Buffalo Bills - *QB DeShone Kizer, Notre Dame, 6-4/230
The Tyrod Taylor situation was a mess. So was Rex Ryan's firing. Welcome to Buffalo, DeShone! From watching the three likely first-round quarterbacks, Kizer is the one I actually like the most. I see a lot of Steve McNair in him.

11. New Orleans Saints - *DL Solomon Thomas, Stanford, 6-3/273
You could really project any defensive player to the Saints here. Thomas teams up with last year's first-round pick, Sheldon Rankins, and veteran Cameron Jordan. That has the makings of a solid unit.

12. Cleveland Browns - *QB Deshaun Watson, Clemson, 6-3/215
This would work out pretty well for Cleveland. They'd get arguably the best player in the draft and the best quarterback in college football last season. Watson's intangibles are off the charts. His decision making waned at times during the year, but his National Championship performance was one for the ages.

13. Arizona Cardinals - *WR Mike Williams, Clemson, 6-3/225
Sorry, Eagles fans, but I just don't see a way Williams gets to No. 14 or 15. He could easily go in the top 10. Williams is a perfect fit for Arizona. He can learn under future HOFer Larry Fitzgerald. 

14/15. Indianapolis Colts - DE/OLB Tim Williams, Alabama, 6-4/252
Like the Saints, you could throw any defensive player here and it would be a solid pick. Williams isn't just a pass rusher, either. He's instinctive and disruptive in the run game as well. He's a perfect replacement for the retiring Robert Mathis.

14/15. Philadelphia Eagles - *CB Sidney Jones, Washington, 6-0/181
Jones isn't the sexiest name available, but he's been an outstanding football player for Washington. After starting 25 of 26 games and racking up six interceptions in his freshman and sophomore seasons, teams stayed away from Jones in 2016.

Before the Peach Bowl, Alabama head coach Nick Saban compared Washington's secondary to the Seattle Seahawks' Legion of Boom. If that's the case, Jones was the Huskies' Richard Sherman. Jones lined up on the left and locked down that side of the field. According to PFF, Jones only saw 48 targets, 199th in the nation. Opposing quarterbacks had a rating of 42.2 when targeting him.

He'd fit in Jim Schwartz's scheme. He excels in both man and zone coverage and plays the game with a ton of confidence. He's fluid in his movements and may be the most technically sound corner in this draft. He's got long arms and is extremely physical at the line of scrimmage. Jones can start right away and make an impact in the Eagles' secondary.

Sure, receiver is a huge need as well. At this point, Western Michigan's Corey Davis would be the best on the board. As good as Davis is (I profiled him relentlessly this season), a player like Jones, with the potential to become a shutdown corner, is more valuable. Florida's Teez Tabor will be brought up in this range as well. He's another very good prospect, but Jones is a more consistent player and the one the Eagles should take.

16. Baltimore Ravens - WR Corey Davis, Western Michigan, 6-3/213
If the Eagles take Davis, I wouldn't be surprised. Davis is a precise route runner who is physical and fast. He's been my draft crush all year and worthy of top-10 consideration. A minor ankle procedure will cause him to miss pre-draft workouts, but it shouldn't affect his draft status.

17. Washington Redskins - *WR John Ross, Washington, 5-11/190
The Redskins will likely lose DeSean Jackson and possibly Pierre Garcon this offseason. If they're looking for replacements with similar skills, they could take the lightning fast Ross to pair with last year's first-round pick Josh Doctson.

18. Tennessee Titans - *CB Teez Tabor, Florida, 6-0/201
Tabor has impressed with his ball skills and his swagger, something people have noted as a trait Schwartz will appreciate. I wouldn't fault the Eagles for taking Tabor instead of Jones. I just see Jones as the more reliable of the two. Tabor and Lattimore could be a formidable duo for the Titans.

19. Tampa Bay Buccaneers - *RB Dalvin Cook, Florida State, 5-11/213
With Doug Martin's future uncertain, Cook is a legitimate playmaker and a three-down back. Martin finished second in the league in rushing in 2015 in Dirk Koetter's offense. Cook should be able to have similar success. 

20. Denver Broncos - *OT Cam Robinson, Alabama, 6-6/310
The Broncos need to establish themselves as a run-first offense and protect whoever is under center. Robinson has been a hotly debated prospect, but I still consider him the No. 1 offensive lineman on the board.

21. Detroit Lions - **CB Marlon Humphrey, Alabama, 6-1/196
Before struggling in the College Football Playoff, many experts considered Humphrey the best corner in the draft. He has world-class speed. He's also got great size and is a physical player.

22. Miami Dolphins - TE O.J. Howard, Alabama, 6-6/251
The run on Alabama players continues. Jarvis Landry is a model of consistency while Devante Parker had a decent sophomore campaign. The Dolphins also saw running back Jay Ajayi emerge as a bell cow back. Howard gives Ryan Tannehill a serious threat at tight end as head coach Adam Gase continues to get more pieces for his offense.

23. New York Giants - *LB Zach Cunningham, Vanderbilt, 6-4/230
For as strong as the Giants' defense was, they were still missing a playmaking linebacker. Cunningham fits that bill. He's likely more of a 4-3 outside linebacker at the next level, but spent his time on the inside at Vandy. With his athleticism, he never has to come off the field.

24. Oakland Raiders - *TE David Njoku, Miami, 6-4/245
Derek Carr has two outside threats in Amari Cooper and Michael Crabtree and the team would be wise to bring back free-agent running back Latavius Murray. In Njoku, Carr gets a dynamic tight end who can expose the middle of the defense and stretch the field.

25. Houston Texans - *OT, Ryan Ramczyk, Wisconsin, 6-6/314
Could the Texans use this pick in an attempt to get a quarterback? After watching Brock Osweiler this year, they probably should. But Ramczyk could fill a similar hole as Lane Johnson did for the Eagles. He could start his career at right tackle before taking over on the left for a former All-Pro in Duane Brown.

26. Seattle Seahawks - *OT Garett Bolles, Utah, 6-5/300
The Seahawks just miss out on Ramczyk but get a decent consolation prize in Bolles. While Ramczyk may fit better in the run game, Bolles is very long and athletic. He needs to add some strength, but Bolles has potential.

27. Kansas City Chiefs - *RB Christian McCaffrey, Stanford, 6-0/200
Jamaal Charles has likely played his last game with the Chiefs and perhaps his last game ever. Spencer Ware had a good season, but McCaffrey offers more. Give McCaffrey Charcandrick West's touches, and Ware and McCaffrey could form a nice one-two punch in Andy Reid's offense.

28. Dallas Cowboys - DE Taco Charlton, Michigan, 6-6/272
Charlton is a perfect fit for Rod Marinelli and the Cowboys. Dallas hasn't had a player register double-digit sacks since 2013. Charlton may not reach that mark in 2017, but certainly has the potential to do it in the future.

29. Green Bay Packers - DE Takkarist McKinley, UCLA, 6-2/265
Both Charlton and McKinley could end up going earlier. This a great draft for edge rushers, especially in the first round. What stands out most about McKinley is his length. His hands almost touch the ground in a two-point stance. With Julius Peppers and Nick Perry set to hit free agency, McKinley may be the best player available and fit a need.

30. Pittsburgh Steelers - *DE Charles Harris, Missouri, 6-3/260
Harris played primarily with his hand in the dirt, but I thought some of his better pass rushes came out of a two-point stance. James Harrison isn't immortal (I don't think), so the Steelers need to groom someone on the other side of the promising Bud Dupree. The disappointing Jarvis Jones is also a free agent.

31. Atlanta Falcons - *S Jabrill Peppers, Michigan, 6-1/205
Peppers is a weird prospect because nobody is quite sure where he fits and he only had one career interception. There's clearly talent there, but it's tough to define him as either a safety or linebacker (or a running back?). I bet on Dan Quinn to find a use for Peppers as he continues to build his defense around dynamic athletes.

32. New England Patriots - *DE, Carl Lawson, Auburn, 6-2/253
For as stingy as the Patriots' defense was, they could have used a little more sack production from their outside rushers. Lawson would be an intriguing prospect for Bill Belichick and company. He isn't as physically imposing as Charlton or McKinley, but he was just as disruptive in 2016.

Eagles propose four rules to be considered by NFL next week

Eagles propose four rules to be considered by NFL next week

Next week, when the NFL convenes for its owners meetings in Phoenix, there will be 15 proposed rule changes under consideration by the competition committee. 

While the one proposed rule change would cut regular-season overtime from 15 to 10 minutes (see story), there are 14 others up for discussion. 

Of those 15, seven were submitted by NFL teams. And of those seven, four were submitted by the Eagles

Three of the four rule proposals from the Eagles are safety related. 

Here are the four from the Eagles, per the NFL: 

1. Gives additional protections for long snappers on kick plays. 

2. Prohibits the “leaper” block attempt on field goal and extra point plays. 

3. Expands the “crown of helmet” foul to include “hairline” part of helmet. 

4. Amends the challenge system by granting a third challenge if a club is successful on at least one of its initial two challenges, and expands reviewable plays outside of two minutes of each half.

The first proposed rule would offer long snappers -- Jon Dorenbos included -- some extra protection. It would add this language to Article 6, Unnecessary Roughness: "When a team is in scrimmage kick formation, a defensive player may not initiate contact with the snapper until one second has elapsed after the snap." 

The second proposed rule change is one of the proposals that has garnered the most attention. Basically, the league now allows players to leap over the line of scrimmage on kicks as long as they don't touch anyone. This new rule would completely outlaw the process of leaping over the line. 

It seems like this rule change is likely to happen. The NFLPA has previously asked for this rule to be changed. 

"So the inevitable is going to happen, and just hearing from the players association, Philly now proposing it is really in the best interest of the game," former Eagle and league football operations director Troy Vincent said on a conference call Thursday. 

The next rule does pretty much exactly what it says: it expands the area that is considered to be the "crown of the helmet." 

Here's the new language that would be added to Article 8, Initiating Contact with the Crown of the Helmet: "Lowering the head and making forcible contact with the crown or 'hairline' parts of the helmet against any part of an opponent shall be considered a foul even if the initiating player's head moves after initial contact and the majority of contact occurs with the side or front of the helmet."

Finally, the last proposal isn't a safety one. It's about replay and is pretty self-explanatory for the most part. 

The reasoning given for this rule change on the proposal: "Provides coaches with a greater opportunity to correct subjective officiating errors, but excludes those fouls that have a minimal opportunity for reversal."

NFL owners mull cut of regular-season overtime to 10 minutes

NFL owners mull cut of regular-season overtime to 10 minutes

NEW YORK -- NFL owners will consider proposals next week to cut regular-season overtime from 15 minutes to 10; eliminate players leaping over the line on kick plays; and expansion of coaches' challenges and what can be reviewed by officials.

In what promises to be a busy annual meeting next week in Phoenix that will include discussing the Raiders' potential relocation from Oakland to Las Vegas, the 32 owners also will vote on changing the mechanics on replay reviews and other items intended to reduce downtime during games.

The Eagles proposed four rules changes, including abolishing the leaping techniques that league football operations director Troy Vincent said Thursday "don't belong in the game."

Seattle and Buffalo co-authored a proposal allowing a coach to challenge any officiating decision, whether a foul is called or not.

"That is a significant change to our current replay rule and it is something that will be on the floor and will be debated next week," NFL officiating chief Dean Blandino said.

Another major change would be the reduction of overtime in-season; the extra period in the playoffs would remain at 15 minutes. The powerful competition committee, of which Vincent and Blandino are members, believed it's a player safety issue, noting that number of snaps for games going to OT -- especially deep into the overtime -- is excessive. Especially if a team has a quick turnaround.

"We don't know where a team is going to be playing the next week, it could be four days later," said committee chairman Rich McKay, president of the Atlanta Falcons. "We felt we should put an end to it. We don't think it will lead to more ties. Could it? It could, but we are not concerned with that."

As for changing the format of overtime to ensure both teams always get a possession -- a popular topic after how the Super Bowl ended -- Blandino said the league's wants to keep the element of sudden death in the extra period.

The "leaper rule" has taken some priority among competition committee members, the players' union and coaches. Vincent said coaches have begun scheming how to defense it, which can "create a real safety issue."

"It is really in the best interest of the game" to outlaw leaping on kicks," Vincent added.

McKay noted that the NCAA is in the process of passing a similar ban on the technique.

During the meetings that run from Sunday to Wednesday, the teams will be shown plays the competition committee believes should result in suspensions or ejections. Game officials already have had the leeway to eject players, but it rarely has happened; there were three in 2016.

"They don't happen very often, let's give the players credit," McKay said. "We have 40,000 plays in a year. We'll show a tape that will have four or five plays that would warrant suspension. This is not a widespread situation."

Added Vincent, a former NFL defensive back: "When you see the plays, they are catastrophic. We had two players who did not return for the season. They are high-impact plays that belong out of the game. It will be a real point of emphasis this season."