Kadron Boone hopes to find a way with Eagles

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Kadron Boone hopes to find a way with Eagles

At this time last year, Kadron Boone was heading into his senior season at LSU, looking to build on a career year as a junior.

Now he’s fighting for a spot on the Eagles’ roster.

After catching 26 passes for 348 yards and four touchdowns in 2012, Boone had just seven receptions in 13 games last season, leading to a precipitous fall off of NFL draft boards. But a sub-4.5 40-yard dash time at LSU’s April 9 pro day drew the eyes of several teams, including the Eagles.

Boone still did not hear his name called in May’s NFL draft despite the impressive workout. The Eagles took a chance on the 6-foot, 202-pound receiver, signing him as an undrafted free agent. One NFL scout told CSNPhilly.com that the Eagles found a steal in Boone, saying, “He’s gonna make that team.

The ups and downs have taught Boone lessons that he has carried into Eagles training camp.

“I think it taught me a valuable lesson in life,” Boone said Monday after practice at Lincoln Financial Field. “Just take advantage of the opportunities that you’re presented.

“I’m just bringing that mindset over. In my first year, it’s going to be all about finding my way whether it’s on special teams, whether it’s offense. Whenever I get an opportunity to showcase my talent, [I’m trying to] make the best of that opportunity.”

As a senior, Boone turned his seven receptions into 129 yards and two touchdowns. With 2014 draftees wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. (first round to the Giants), running back Jeremy Hill (second round to the Bengals) and wide receiver Jarvis Landry (second round to the Dolphins) also lining up on LSU’s offense last year, opportunities were hard to come by.

“I didn’t get a lot of opportunities in my senior year,” Boone said. “But the ones I did, I made a play. Whether it was a big block that led to a touchdown or whether it was a big catch on third down or whether it was a touchdown.”

Now Boone’s playing with another talented crop of offensive weapons, and he recognizes the experience that surrounds him. He’s trying to soak it up like a sponge, learning from pass-catching veterans like Jeremy Maclin, Riley Cooper and Brad Smith.

“With them being in the league, if I do something in practice, they’ll correct it,” Boone said. “Anytime I have a question, I’m able to go up to those guys and ask them a question.

“If you watch us together, we critique each other. So, it’s not just [Maclin] telling me what I messed up on. If we see something, we’ll tell him, ‘Hey this is what we saw on your part.’ Just critiquing each other, and that’s the close bond we already have.”

Along with the vast talent around him, Boone has found comfort in another area: the fans. Playing high school and college ball in the football-rabid South, he knows all about passionate fan bases.

“It was great to see the turnout that we had here today,” Boone said after the team’s first open practice to fans. “Ever since I’ve been here, I’ve been hearing about how they’re the best fans. You can see the dedication that they have to us.”

NFL owners approve Raiders' move from Oakland to Las Vegas

NFL owners approve Raiders' move from Oakland to Las Vegas

PHOENIX -- Invoking his father Al's name, and copying what the Hall of Fame owner did with the Raiders, Mark Davis is moving the franchise out of Oakland.

NFL owners approved the Raiders' move to Las Vegas 31-1 at the league meetings Monday. Miami was the lone dissenter.

"My father used to say the greatness of the Raiders is in the future," Davis said. "This gives us the ability to achieve that."

The vote was a foregone conclusion after the league and Raiders were not satisfied with Oakland's proposals for a new stadium, and Las Vegas stepped up with $750 million in public money. Bank of America also is giving Davis a $650 million loan, further helping to persuade owners to allow the third team relocation in just over a year.

The Rams moved from St. Louis to Los Angeles in 2016, and in January the Chargers relocated from San Diego to LA.

"You know our goal is to have 32 stable franchises for each team and the league," Commissioner Roger Goodell said. "We work very hard and never want to see the relocation of a franchise. We worked tirelessly over the last nine months or so on a solution. We needed to provide certainties and stability for the Raiders and the league."

The Raiders, whose relocation fee of approximately $350 million is less than the $650 million the Rams and Chargers paid, likely will play two or three more years in the Bay Area before their $1.7 billion stadium near the Las Vegas Strip is ready.

"I wouldn't use the term lame duck," Davis insisted. "We're still the Raiders and we represent Raider Nation.

"There will be disappointed fans and it's important for me to talk to them to explain why and how."

Las Vegas, long taboo to the NFL because of its legalized gambling, also is getting an NHL team this fall, the Golden Knights.

"Today will forever change the landscape of Las Vegas and UNLV football," said Steve Sisolak, chairman of the Clark County Commission and a former member of a panel appointed by Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval to study the stadium tax funding plan. "I couldn't be more excited for the fans and residents of Clark County as we move forward with the Raiders and the Rebels."

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and a group trying to keep the team in Oakland, made a last-ditch presentation to the NFL last week. But that letter was "filled with uncertainty," according to Goodell.

Monday, she asked owners to delay the vote, wanting to give her city a chance to negotiate with a small group of owners to complete a stadium deal at the Coliseum site.

"Never that we know of has the NFL voted to displace a team from its established market when there is a fully financed option before them with all the issues addressed," Schaaf said in a statement. "I'd be remiss if I didn't do everything in my power to make the case for Oakland up until the very end."

Schaaf said the city presented a $1.3 billion plan for a stadium that would be ready by 2021. She said the existing Coliseum would be demolished by 2024, with the Oakland Athletics baseball team either moving to a new stadium at the Coliseum site or somewhere else in the city.

But the presence of the A's in that sports complex was particularly troubling to the NFL, Goodell said.

"We understand the Raiders' need for a new stadium," A's President Dave Kaval said. "Oakland is an incredible sports town and we would be sorry to see them leave. We commend the city's and county's efforts to keep the Raiders in Oakland. The mayor and her team have worked incredibly hard to save the franchise.

"We are focused on, and excited about, our efforts to build a new ballpark in Oakland and look forward to announcing a location this year."

The Raiders' move became more certain this month when Bank of America offered the loan. That replaced the same amount the Raiders lost when the league balked at having casino owner Sheldon Adelson involved and he was dropped from the team's plans.

Davis on Monday thanked Adelson for his "vision and leadership," saying the entire deal might not have happened without him.

Leaving the Bay Area is not something new with the Raiders, who played in Los Angeles from 1982-94 before heading back to Oakland. Davis was passed over last year in an attempt to move to a stadium in the LA area that would have been jointly financed with the Chargers. Instead, the owners approved the Rams' relocation and gave the Chargers an option to join them, which they exercised this winter.

Now, it's off to the desert for the Raiders. Well, in a few years.

"The opportunity to build a world-class stadium in the entertainment capital of the world," Davis said, "is a significant step toward achieving that greatness."

Eagles storylines at the 2017 owners meetings in Phoenix

Eagles storylines at the 2017 owners meetings in Phoenix

PHOENIX -- After a cold couple of weeks in Philly, Jeffrey Lurie and the Eagles' brass will get a chance to catch some rays this week. 

Lurie and the rest of the NFL's owners and decision-makers will meet this week at the lavish Arizona Biltmore resort. 

In addition to the actual meetings of the owners, the league's competition committee will look at 15 rule proposals, one of which was proposed and will be presented by the Eagles. Lurie is expected to speak to reporters for the first time in a year. 

And, of course, the annual coaches breakfasts will take place extremely early on Tuesday and Wednesday. The AFC goes on Tuesday, while Doug Pederson and the NFC coaches will field questions from reporters on Wednesday. 

It'll be a busy few days with the beauty of Phoenix as the backdrop. 

Here are a few of the big Eagles storylines to keep an eye on.

Long time, no talk 
Reporters haven't had a chance to talk to Lurie since this week last year. A lot has happened since then. Doug Pederson and Carson Wentz went through their first seasons as coach and quarterback for the Eagles. Joe Douglas was hired as the team's vice president of player personnel. And Howie Roseman has continued to transform the roster through trades and free agency.

Last season was the first time Lurie spoke since reinstating Roseman to power, so despite Lurie's efforts to talk about RFID and next-generation stats, the conversation focused on the direction and leadership of the team. 

There's a ton to talk to Lurie about this year -- including his recently-penned piece in Time Magazine that railed against political polarization in Washington (see story).  

An hour with Doug 
This year, Philly reporters will actually be able to talk to Pederson at the NFC coaches breakfast on Wednesday. In 2016, most split their time between Chip Kelly and Pederson. 

At that point, Kelly was the 49ers' coach and had not yet talked about his split with the Eagles. 

But a whole hour with Pederson is on the schedule this year. Plenty of questions about the future of the franchise, the draft and the free-agent acquisitions. We haven't spoken to Pederson since the combine, which came before the team brought in Alshon Jeffery, Torrey Smith and Chance Warmack in free agency. 

Whatchu talkin' bout, Howie? 
Roseman talked a bunch last season as the 2016 NFL draft drew closer, but this offseason revealed that everything he said back then was nonsense. Last offseason was all about moving up to the No. 2 pick (at least) to draft Wentz and get the Eagles a franchise quarterback. 

One of the interesting things Roseman talked about in 2016 was taking running backs high in the draft. He praised Ezekiel Elliott, calling him a "rare" prospect. 

At that point, the Eagles were picking eighth and Elliott was thought to be a possible target for them. Here's what Roseman said last year: 

"You talk about the elite guys and where they're coming from, and they're hard to find. It's hard to find three-down backs, so when you get a chance to look at someone like that, it changes the discussion. They're certainly on your board."

The running backs in this year's draft aren't Elliott -- they're simply not as good at everything and not ready to step in and be stars. But by the way Roseman spoke last year, he didn't rule out taking a running back in the first round. This year, there will likely be a couple good ones on the board at No. 14. 

But remember, everything he said last year was just nonsense. 

For now, Roseman isn't scheduled to speak to reporters, but that could change. 

The rule proposals
The competition committee will meet this week to go over several proposals -- among them are 15 playing rule proposals. 

The Eagles originally proposed four playing rule changes and one proposal that would have allowed teams to wear alternate helmets to match alternate jerseys. Well, after feedback from the competition committee, the Eagles are withdrawing all but one proposal, according to league sources. 

The only proposal left would rule out leaping on kick plays. For now, players are allowed to leap as long as they don't touch anyone on the way over. This change had already been suggested by the NFLPA, so it seems like it has a good shot to pass. 

Among the other rules the NFL's competition committee will consider is one that would shorten the overtime period in the regular season from 15 to 10 minutes. The length would remain 15 minutes in the playoffs. 

The competition committee will meet to go over these proposals on Tuesday.