For Lane Johnson, familiarity is paying off


For Lane Johnson, familiarity is paying off

He’s not the new guy anymore, and for Lane Johnson, that’s perfectly fine.

A year after he entered OTAs as the Eagles' first-round pick (and fourth overall selection of the draft) and quickly found himself thrown into the starting lineup, Johnson feels much more relaxed this time around.

“This year is a lot different,” Johnson said. “I know the schedule, the plays and the offense, so I’m more familiar with things. I feel a lot more comfortable than as a rookie.”

While the Eagles have spent this year’s OTAs bringing their top draft picks along slowly and keeping them away from the first team, last year was much different. The team needed a new right tackle and Johnson was expected to contribute right away.

Despite starting all 16 games his rookie year, there is plenty of room for Johnson to improve as he enters his sophomore campaign. While he excelled as a run-blocker, the 6-foot-6, 317-pound tackle struggled at times in pass protection, giving up 11 sacks, according to Pro Football Focus.

According to Johnson, the biggest key to his development has been the stability of playing in one spot on the line.

If Johnson remains at right tackle as expected, it will be the first time he has played the same position in two consecutive years since high school.

A high school quarterback who arrived at Oklahoma as a tight end, Johnson was starting at right tackle by his junior year before moving to the left side as a senior. Switched back to the right side last year by the Eagles, he is looking forward to staying put for once.

“This is the first year I’ve been able to play the same position for consecutive years, so playing back-to-back [years] at right tackle will be good for me,” Johnson said. “In the pass set, I feel a lot more comfortable on the right side than I did last year.”

Having a year of experience under his belt has also helped Johnson become more vocal and assertive with his decision-making.

As part of a unit with three players (Todd Herremans, Evan Mathis and Jason Peters) over 30, Johnson kept mostly quiet last season and let his veteran teammates make the calls. He relied especially heavily on Herremans, who lined up next to him at right guard.

“He’s not a first-year player now and he’s not relying on Todd Herremans to make the calls for him,” Chip Kelly said before Tuesday’s OTA. “Last year, Lane made decisions by saying, ‘Todd, tell me what to do,’ and then executing it. Now he knows what to do and is communicating a little better with those guys.”

Barring injury, the Eagles will return the same starting offensive line in 2014 that helped them finish second in the NFL in points per game (27.6) last season and helped LeSean McCoy lead the league in rushing.

Having given up the most sacks and having committed the most penalties (eight) out the team’s starting linemen, Johnson will look to be more consistent in Year 2 and prove that he was worth being a top-four pick.

“There was a lot of guessing and being unsure of myself last year,” Johnson said. “I want to come out playing fast right away and be confident and I think when I do that good things will happen.”

Vikings, Brad Childress deny claims of bounty system in 2008

Vikings, Brad Childress deny claims of bounty system in 2008

The Vikings and former head coach Brad Childress are denying allegations that they ran a bounty system in 2008-09 that was similar to the one that the Saints ran. 
“It was part of the culture. I had coaches start a pot and all the veterans put in an extra $100, $200, and if you hurt someone special, you get the money,” former offensive lineman Artis Hicks told Deadspin.

Childress, the former Eagles assistant and current co-offensive coordinator of the Chiefs, told ESPN, "I had a great opportunity to coach a lot of great people there, including Artis Hicks, at the Minnesota Vikings. I have too much respect for the Wilf family [and] professional football to have anything to do with a bounty system. I'm going to let it stand at that.’'

Current and former Vikings’ players are also denying any knowledge of the bounty system. Defensive end Brian Robinson, who has been on the team since 2007, says he hasn’t heard of any bounty system.

The Vikings are familiar with the bounty system, since the Saints allegedly were targeting Brett Farve in the 2010 NFC Championship Game. It is important to note that Childress was the one who informed the NFL about the bounty on Farve after hearing it from a player. 

Eagles Injury Update: Bennie Logan misses practice again

Eagles Injury Update: Bennie Logan misses practice again

For the second straight day this week, the Eagles practiced without starting defensive tackle Bennie Logan. 

Logan, who has been dealing with a groin strain he suffered against Washington, hasn't practiced since that game and didn't play against the Vikings. 

With just one more day left to practice this week before the game in Dallas on Sunday night, it seems increasingly likely that Beau Allen will get his second straight start in Logan's place. 

In addition to Logan, linebacker Kamu Grugier-Hill (hamstring) also missed practice for the second straight day on Thurday. He and Logan are considered to be "week to week." 

After being limited on Wednesday, Mychal Kendricks (ribs) and Jordan Matthews (knee) were both full participants in Thursday's practice. So was Jason Peters (bicep). 

The only limited participant on Thursday was defensive tackle Taylor Hart (ankle), whom the Eagles just re-claimed this week from San Francisco.