Mosher's Mailbag: Can Eagles win with current WRs?

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Mosher's Mailbag: Can Eagles win with current WRs?

In this week’s edition of Mosher’s Mailbag, I answer a question about the Eagles’ receivers.

Q. Do you think the Eagles can win the division again in 2014 with their current receiving corps?

-- Rick Brzyski (@BossManRickB)

A. Sure do. Your question seems to imply that the Eagles have a substandard receiving corps, which I don’t think is the case. Of course, the fate of the corps hinges on whether Jeremy Maclin comes back fully healthy from last year’s ACL injury, his second since the start of his college career and in the same knee. If Maclin is anywhere near the receiver he was pre-injury, he should be a really effective weapon in Chip Kelly’s offense.

Maclin won’t be an exact replacement over DeSean Jackson. He’s a different kind of player. He can’t match Jackson’s speed (who can?) but Maclin is a better route runner and more versatile. He’ll probably see a good deal of snaps in the slot because he’s bigger and more equipped to handle the traffic across the middle.

The Eagles undoubtedly lost a pure field stretcher when they got rid of Jackson, but Kelly has shown throughout his coaching career, in college and in his first NFL season, that cats aren’t skinned just one way. Maybe the Eagles don’t get 1,332 yards and nine touchdowns out of Maclin, but it’s entirely possible -- probable, actual -- that tight end Zach Ertz and rookie receiver Jordan Matthews combine for much more than the 39 receptions for 447 yards that Jason Avant produced last year. (Ertz had 36 catches for 469 yards by himself, nearly matching Avant’s production).

I’m not sure what to make of Riley Cooper. He definitely benefited from the change-over from Mike Vick to Nick Foles, but he also reaped the benefits of playing opposite Jackson and seeing plenty of single coverage. Opponents probably won’t commit as many resources to Maclin as they did for Jackson, which means Cooper’s numbers could drop, but he’s still a big target and can still be effective red-zone weapon.

Although Darren Sproles isn’t technically a wide receiver, you still have to consider his impact on the passing game. Teams that try to man-press the Eagles will have to devote a linebacker or safety to Sproles, even if he’s just catching passes out of the backfield, and those are matchups Sproles has historically won.

Pro athletes react to Donald Trump's inauguration

Pro athletes react to Donald Trump's inauguration

A look at some of the reaction around the sports world as Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday:

Buffalo Bills offensive lineman Richie Incognito on Twitter
"Today is the first day on the road to Making America Great Again #Inauguration2017"

Memphis Grizzlies forward JaMychal Green on Twitter
"Hope these 4 years fly by ? #TimeToPray"

Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Huston Street on Twitter
"Today we start a new chapter, let's work together, and remember only saying negative without an idea is creating divide, it does not help US"

Indianapolis Colts punter Pat McAfee on Twitter
"Inauguration Day.. Some folks happier than they've ever been.. some folks madder than they've ever been.. what a time to be alive"

Former USWNT soccer player Lauren Holiday , to her infant daughter, on Instagram
"I may not be the president, baby but I'll promise to be your Mom. I'll teach you that your brown skin is beautiful. I'll show you that being a girl and a woman is a privilege. How being incredibly powerful means serving those around you and fighting for those who cannot fight for themselves. I will tell you about Jesus and how he taught us to love unconditionally. We will have many talks about equality and I will always encourage generosity. One day if you ask me what you can be, I will smile and say absolutely anything. I'll tell you whatever it is you choose, be kind. I'll fight for you, I'll cheer for you and I'll love you along the way. But most of all, I'll make sure you're hopeful. So today, baby, I'll choose hope."

Portland Trail Blazers guard C.J. McCollum on Twitter
"Appreciate you Mr. 44"

Atlanta Hawks guard Thabo Sefolosha on Twitter
"The only President my 2 daughters have known. Feels strange going from them to the new guy. Thanks for the class act Barack and Michelle !"

Former Texas and NFL receiver Jordan Shipley on Twitter
"Heard God's word in the inauguration speech. I care about our country being under God a lot more than I care about politics or parties."

Los Angeles Clippers guard Chris Paul on Twitter
"Thank You!!! #44"

New England Patriots QB Tom Brady when asked on Friday if he called Trump to congratulate him.
"Let's talk about football."

On verge of Super Bowl, Eric Rowe responds to Eagles, Roseman

On verge of Super Bowl, Eric Rowe responds to Eagles, Roseman

The Eagles' season ended a few weeks ago with a 7-9 record. 

In a couple weeks, Eric Rowe might be playing in the Super Bowl. 

Rowe, of course, was the Eagles' second-round pick in 2015 and went on to have a promising rookie season. But in 2016, the change of head coaches brought a new defensive coordinator and a new scheme, which Rowe apparently didn't fit. So a few days before the season began, he was dealt to the New England Patriots, where he has become a big part of their defense. 

In his after-the-season press conference on Jan. 4, Eagles vice president of football operations Howie Roseman was asked about the trade and gave a somewhat curious answer. He said the team made the move because the front office had already determined they were not going to give Rowe an extension, even though he wouldn't have been eligible for two more seasons. 

If that sounded weird to Eagles fans, they weren't alone. It sounded weird to Rowe too, when the Wilmington News Journal's Martin Frank caught up with him this week. 

“That’s a long time away," Rowe said. "If that’s the reason, that’s really, really weird. You know, it’s whatever. If he thinks that, then I guess that’s what it was. They’re thinking way down the line.” 

Rowe, 24, ended up starting seven games during this regular season for New England but played just 43 percent of the Patriots' defensive snaps. If Rowe played 50 percent of defensive snaps in 2016 or if he does it in 2017, the fourth-round pick the Eagles get back in the trade will turn into a third-rounder, so there's still a chance next year. 

While a third-round pick wouldn't be bad, the Eagles gave up on a young, talented corner just a year after drafting him because he didn't fit what they wanted to do. 

Shortly after the trade, defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz called Rowe a good cover corner but cited the development of Jalen Mills as a reason why Rowe became expendable. Schwartz said he appreciated Rowe, but the personnel staff "decided to use him as an asset, and as coaches, we just deal with that and keep playing." 

It was pretty clear during training camp that Rowe had fallen out of favor with the Eagles. He was buried behind Mills and others on the depth chart, so maybe the trade was the best thing for him.

"That was frustrating, just kind of like thinking, 'What am I doing wrong?'" Rowe said to the Wilmington News Journal. "Yeah, I made mistakes, but everybody makes mistakes. I'm not making bad mistakes. I'm making plays. Why am I sliding down? That was frustrating times. I would just go home and my girlfriend's there, and I'm telling her all this stuff. I'd tell my parents, and they're like, 'Just keep your head up, just keep working because you never know. Then boom, the trade comes up." 

And now he might get a chance to play in the Super Bowl, while the Eagles desperately need to fix their cornerback position before next season.