Nelson Agholor not discussing drops: 'I’m tired of hearing that s---'

Nelson Agholor not discussing drops: 'I’m tired of hearing that s---'

ARLINGTON, Texas — Nelson Agholor is tired of talking about drops. 
 
While he was responsible for just one drop during Sunday night's 29-23 loss to the Cowboys at AT&T Stadium, the Eagles had several, and the offense compiled just 291 yards. 
 
Agholor’s drop came in the first half on a slant from Carson Wentz near the end zone on 3rd-and-6 and the Eagles had to settle for a field goal. For the game, Agholor finished with three catches on four targets for 25 yards. 
 
In the locker room, he was asked about the drops and plays the Eagles left on the field. 
 
That set him off a little bit.
 
“At the end of the day, man, that s--- is nothing,” a seemingly perturbed Agholor told reporters after the game. “You just got to make the next one. Everybody runs routes, sometimes they're contested, sometimes you drop them. But if you make as many as you possibly can that come your way, you're gonna put yourself in a good position. No one's perfect. 
 
“I don't look at no drops, none of that type of s---. I'm tired of hearing that s---. That s--- [is] stupid. We play football. I dropped the first one, I ain't drop one after that. What does it matter? Because if we lose, now it's like one play is blamed. 'Oh this person did this.' No! 
 
“As a team, we had a responsibility to win football games and I get it. Certain plays could have helped. But there's still four quarters of football to be played and we gotta win. You heard it from me. I don't have time for that no more, man. I got time to win football games only. No statistics, no who did this. Win! That's all that matters. That's what this coaching staff cares about, that's what I care about, that's what we all care about: winning football games.”
 
After Sunday’s game, Agholor said he felt bad for the Eagles’ defense because while the defense couldn’t stop the Cowboys when it really mattered, the Eagles' offense couldn’t put the game away either. 
 
The offense deserved plenty of the blame. 
 
“Completely, man,” Agholor said. “This game comes down to a whole team. Ain't none of that s---. At the end of the day, this whole team had a responsibility to finish the football game. Every individual player that suited up tonight had a responsibility. There's not one player, not one side of the ball, none of that s---. It's a whole team and it sucked to lose the f------ football game. That's just how I feel. I don't put blame on nobody. We needed to win a football game tonight.”
 
Through six games this season, Agholor has 21 catches for 216 yards and a touchdown. While he should easily surpass his rookie numbers soon, this season has still been a disappointment for the 2015 first-round pick. 
 
It’s been even more disappointing now that the Eagles have lost three of their last four games following an impressive 3-0 start. 
 
“It's frustrating because at the end of the day, we want to win,” he said. “We deserved to win. We practiced hard and we played hard. We wanted to win that football game and at the end of the day, certain things didn't go our way and it sucks that that was the case. But we need to learn from it, just like Coach said, just like we needed to learn from all the ones before. 
 
“We need to find a way to wake up and start winning football games the way we truly deserve to and we truly prepare to. We practice very hard, we practice with great detail and now we just need to execute and win on Sunday.”

Eagles owner Jeff Lurie rails against political polarization in Washington

Eagles owner Jeff Lurie rails against political polarization in Washington

Eagles owner Jeff Lurie isn't often very outspoken on football or political matters. 

He has apparently made an exception. 

Just a few days before Lurie is tentatively scheduled to speak to Philadelphia reporters while in Phoenix for the league's annual meetings, the Eagles owner authored a story for Time Magazine railing against political polarization in Washington.

Lurie has not spoken to reporters publicly since last March in Boca Raton, Florida, at the 2016 owners meetings. 

The owner's essay was published just hours after House Republican leaders pulled legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act on Friday afternoon. Lurie, for the record, donated money to Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign last year.

Lurie, the Eagles' 65-year-old billionaire owner, in the story, uses football as an example for which Washington should strive. 

Here's how Lurie begins the piece:

"What do football, political polarization and autism have in common? They all illuminate aspects of the human condition, explaining who we are, where we are headed and the hurdles along the way. As a sports team owner I rarely publicly discuss politics, but as a member of a family touched by autism, I often think about the unspoken millions of people who live with the daily challenges of this disorder."

Lurie then goes on to explain why football can act as a guide for Washington when it comes to united for the common good:

"What I have learned from football can be applied to society at large. Just as we intensely game-plan against an opponent in sports, we need to game plan for the reality and consequences of polarization. Extreme polarization is the opponent -- not each other. A football team is made up of players from a wide variety of backgrounds, experiences and political viewpoints. What unites them is grit, determination, and the desire to win. They join in a common goal and do what is necessary to transcend their differences for the greater good of their team.

"What unites Americans is far more negative. We are now in an age where communicating verifiable information becomes secondary to the goal of creating a common enemy that unifies people in fear, negativity and opposition. This masks our inability to solve serious domestic problems (poverty, violence and institutional racism to name three current examples) and diverts our attention from obvious suffering."

Lurie then writes that we, as Americans, have the "necessary resources" to tackle serious problems, like autism, but lack the leadership to put aside differences. 

The whole piece isn't very long and is worth reading in full to gain a better understanding of its context. 

Next week while in Phoenix, Lurie will surely be asked about what motivated him to write the piece. 

Eagles withdraw all but 1 rule proposal for owners meetings

Eagles withdraw all but 1 rule proposal for owners meetings

As the annual NFL meetings get set to kick off next week, the Eagles originally proposed four playing rule changes and a resolution that could have eventually led to bringing back Kelly green uniforms as an alternate option. 

But after getting feedback from the NFL's competition committee, the Eagles are withdrawing all but one proposal, according to league sources. 

The only one left would prohibit players from leaping over the line of scrimmage on kicking plays. For now, players are allowed to leap line as long as they don't make contact. That proposal, which the NFLPA has previously supported, seems likely to pass. 

That means the other three playing rule changes and the proposal to allow teams to wear helmets that would match their alternative jerseys won't be specifically discussed. 

Translation: No Kelly green jerseys yet. 

Among the 15 proposed playing rule changes the league released on Friday, teams were responsible for seven of them and the Eagles accounted for four of the seven. 

Just because a specific proposal won't be directly discussed, it doesn't mean that topic won't be discussed by the committee in Phoenix during next week's annual league meetings. 

For instance, one of the Eagles' proposals would alter the current replay system. While the Eagles' individual proposal won't be discussed, replays will be a topic of discussion during the meetings.