NFL draft: Breaking down Eagles' division rivals

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NFL draft: Breaking down Eagles' division rivals

We know how the Eagles' draft picks stack up, so here's a look at the rest of the NFC East:

New York Giants
The Giants surprised a lot of their fans by passing on Pittsburgh DT Aaron Donald and Notre Dame OL Zack Martin at No. 12 to select LSU WR Odell Beckham. And while I believe addressing either their offensive or defensive line was their top priority, it's hard to argue with taking a playmaker like Beckham.

The Giants lost Hakeem Nicks to the Colts this offseason, and giving Eli Manning more weapons may help him bounce back after an atrocious 2013 season. On the flip side, this draft was so deep at WR, New York may have been smart to grab either Donald or Martin at No. 12 and wait until the second or third round to load up on offensive weapons.

I loved their second-round selection, Colorado State offensive lineman Weston Richburg. He played center in college but can move out to guard if they need him to in the pros. Richburg was my top center in the draft and should start immediately.

They reached a bit for Syracuse DT Jay Bromley in the third round, but he should be able to contribute immediately as a run-stuffer.

Fourth-rounder Andre Williams, a RB out of Boston College, could be a workhorse in time, but may be a short-yardage back behind Rashad Jennings in the near future. Hard to not like a guy who ran for 2,177 yards in 2013.

The Giants failed to address their hole at tight end, but after the first four came off the board, I didn't see any candidates who would be much of an impact player.

The Giants' draft was solid and hinges on whether Beckham can make a big impact on an offense that often stalled out in 2013.

Washington Redskins
Redskins fans rejoice!

This was the last draft the 'Skins endured under the debilitating 2012 RG3 trade with St. Louis. But just to rub things in, with the picks the Rams got from Washington for the second overall pick in the 2012 draft (obviously used to draft Robert Griffin III), St. Louis was able to select the following players (thanks to some additional wheeling and dealing): DT Michael Brockers, CB Janoris Jenkins, LB Alec Ogletree, WR Stedman Bailey, RB Zac Stacy and OT Greg Robinson. A very nice haul indeed.

With that out of the way, despite not having their first-round pick (would have been second overall), the 'Skins came away with some decent pieces in some needed areas.

In the second round, the 'Skins traded down with the Cowboys from No. 34 (Dallas selected Boise St. defensive end Demarcus Lawrence) to No. 47 (and received Dallas' third-round pick, No. 78) and selected Stanford DE/OLB Trent Murphy. I have always liked Murphy just based on the tenacious play -- the guy just doesn't stop coming, and his 15 sacks in 2013 led the nation. But the more I watched him, the more I didn't think he would be a guy who could get to the QB consistently in the NFL. He's just not that quick off the ball, and most of his sacks were effort sacks.

But with Brian Orakpo most likely leaving next season, Washington's thought process is understandable. I just may have stood pat at 34 and taken Lawrence instead, but Murphy is the kind of player you want to battle with every week and could turn out to be a poor man's Ryan Kerrigan.

In the third round, the 'Skins addressed a porous offensive line by drafting Virginia tackle Morgan Moses (No. 66) and Nebraska guard Spencer Long (No. 78). I thought Moses had first-round talent; he should be able to step in at RT immediately, displacing the inconsistent Tyler Polumbus, and be a backup to LT Trent Williams as well.

Long, who has been injury-prone over the past two seasons, could replace Chris Chester at RG if he's completely healed from an MCL tear he sustained last season. I would have been more impressed if the 'Skins grabbed Mississippi State's Gabe Jackson instead (he went three picks later to the Raiders at No. 81).

The Skins' last pick of consequence, at least in my eyes, was Clemson CB Bashaud Breeland. A tough, stout corner, Breeland adds quality depth to a thin secondary. I thought Breeland could have gone as early as the late second round, so good value there.

The Redskins added good depth and two or three potential starters despite not having a first-round pick. Nothing sexy here, just solid across the board.

Dallas Cowboys
The Cowboys disappointed a lot of people by passing on Texas A&M QB Johnny Manziel at No. 16. Not only did they pass on perhaps the biggest wild card in the draft, but they also instead made the first-round's most boring pick in Notre Dame OT Zack Martin. But boring doesn't mean bad, and Martin should plug in to Dallas' offensive line either at RT or LG and make them a whole lot better. Jerry Jones actually made a smart decision here.

In the second round, Jones swapped second-round picks and gave up his third-round pick to Washington to select Lawrence at No. 34. I like Lawrence, and with all the top safeties off the board, grabbing one of the rare pass rushers in the draft made sense for them even if it meant paying a steep price.

The rest of Dallas' draft was a mixed bag. A reach in the fourth round for Iowa LB Anthony Hitchens, who they probably could have gotten much later in the draft, was followed by the acquisition of pick No. 148 from the Lions in exchange for No. 158 and No. 229 so they could select Pitt WR Devin Street.

I think they would have been much better off staying where they were and selecting either Princeton DT Caraun Reid or Wisconsin WR Jared Abbrederis. Baylor S Ahmad Dixon (No. 248) and Oregon CB Terrance Mitchell (254) in the seventh round could prove to be great depth picks.

The Boys got two nice pieces in the first two rounds in Martin and Lawrence, but with the number of picks they had I would have liked to have seen more guys who can make impacts sooner.

Jeff Lurie: Condition of Roseman's promotion was to solidify personnel department

Jeff Lurie: Condition of Roseman's promotion was to solidify personnel department

PHOENIX -- Joe Douglas is a big, imposing man. 

As he's walked around lavish greenery at the Biltmore Hotel in Arizona at the annual league meetings this week, he's towered over most of the other NFL executives, including his boss, Howie Roseman.

Douglas is large in physical stature. His role within the Eagles organization seems to match.

"The hiring of Joe Douglas, I thought, was the pivotal moment of the last year," Eagles owner Jeff Lurie said on Tuesday night, speaking for the first time in over a year. 

Douglas was hired in May to head up the Eagles' personnel department, the result of a months-long search administered by Lurie, Roseman and senior advisor Tom Donahoe. 

Last year, when Lurie gave Roseman the power as the overseer of the entire football operations department, the new job came with one condition: He had to put together a top personnel department. 

That started with hiring Douglas. 

"One of the main things Howie and I discussed when he was going to be in the football operations role was he had to have a top-notch player personnel department," Lurie said. "Or we were going to find somebody that could find a great player personnel department. That was his responsibility."

To fulfill that request, Roseman went out and brought Douglas, who cut his teeth for years under greatly respected general manager Ozzie Newsome in Baltimore. Douglas brought with him Andy Weidl, who is now his second in command. 

While Lurie said he gets plenty of congratulations from general managers around the league about drafting Carson Wentz, he said he gets more about luring Douglas to Philly. And this offseason, the Eagles have seemingly made a concerted effort to put Douglas in the limelight. He sat on the stage dwarfing Roseman at a press conference earlier in March and has been plenty visible this week in Phoenix. 

Speaking for the first time since the Eagles were able to move up and draft Wentz at No. 2 last season, Lurie was effusive in his praise of Roseman. He marveled that Roseman was not only able to move up to draft Wentz, but also that he put together a contract for Sam Bradford that allowed him to be traded and then pulled off a move to get a first-round pick for him. 

But that part of the job has never been a knock on Roseman. 

For years, Roseman has shown himself to be an aggressive general manager and incredibly adept in all salary cap matters. But the big question about Roseman has been about his talent evaluation. Together, with Douglas, the two could potentially combine to be a complete general manager, capable of every aspect of the job. And not just capable, but at the top of the class. 

That’s the plan anyway. 

"The draft is going to be really built by Joe and the final decision will be made by Howie," he said. "But these guys are unbelievably collaborative. I haven’t seen anything like this. We have such trust in Joe that basically when that board's there, unless there's something extraordinary happens, it's going to be set by Joe and then we'll just make the final decision in case of anything. But that’s a great system, I think, and Doug will be very involved. The coaches will be very involved as usual, but there's obvious clarity on the decision-making."

This offseason, the Eagles have been publicly honest about the state of the franchise and Lurie didn't deviate from that on Tuesday night. While Lurie is now 65 and has seen his team in the Super Bowl just once, he understands the need to be patient. 

The Eagles hope they found their franchise quarterback last season. Now it's all about drafting the talent to put around him to make the team successful. That's why the condition that Roseman beef up the personnel department upon his promotion was such an important part of his new job. 

"You have to draft well, you have to have multiple drafts in a row, hopefully, where you surround that quarterback on all sides of the ball and that's the formula. It's not that complicated. It's hard to accomplish, but it's not that complicated," Lurie said. 

"As an owner, I have to be really patient and at the same time, very competitive. We'll make moves that will make us better this year, however, we won't make a move where it's going to cost us flexibility or ability to use resources in future years. Because we're in the mode where we're not one player away. We have lots of holes."

It's up to Douglas and Roseman to fill them.

Owners meetings: Jeff Lurie wants to bring back Kelly green jerseys

Owners meetings: Jeff Lurie wants to bring back Kelly green jerseys

PHOENIX -- Jeff Lurie wants to bring back Kelly green. 

The Eagles owner confirmed on Tuesday evening in Arizona at the annual league meetings that a proposal the Eagles initially submitted last week to allow teams to wear alternate helmets was all about bringing back the fan-favorite jerseys. 

For years, fan feedback to reporters about bringing Kelly green jerseys back has been overwhelming.

"It's overwhelming for me too. I would love to see it," Lurie said. "I love the midnight green, I think it's great. But I also want the Kelly green. I'd love for us to have both and some games have one and some games have the other. I think that would be more fun."

The reason the Eagles aren't yet using their Kelly green jerseys is language in the NFL's on-field policy that prohibits teams from wearing alternate helmets. For now, teams are only permitted to wear their primary helmets. And a midnight green helmet atop a Kelly green jersey would be an obvious clash. 

The resolution the Eagles proposed, but then withdrew before the competition committee met, would strike that language from the rule and  allow teams to wear alternate helmets "in a color to match their third uniform."  

Lurie said before the owners' meetings, the Eagles met with the competition committee, which told them the rule wouldn't pass. That's when they decided to withdraw the proposal this year. 

But Lurie isn't giving up. 

"They are aware that many teams would like to see this," he said. "My hope is that we'll be able to get it done hopefully by next March."

When asked why the league doesn't currently allow alternate helmets to be worn, Lurie declined to get into the specifics, saying it's a "complicated scenario." But he also seemed optimistic that eventually, the Eagles will be back in Kelly green. While Lurie preached patience in football matters, he admitted he's a little more impatient on this topic. 

Lurie's plan is to at first try the Kelly green jerseys as an alternate for two or three games, but didn't rule out the possibility of making a full-time switch back to the fan-favorite color. 

The last time the Eagles wore Kelly green was in 2010, when they faced the Packers in the 50th anniversary of the 1960 NFL championship. 

There would be a way to get around the current rules to wear Kelly green, but Lurie is set on doing it the right way. 

"Decals are an option," Lurie said, shaking his head, "but I want a Kelly green helmet. It looks better."