NFL draft: Breaking down Eagles' division rivals

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NFL draft: Breaking down Eagles' division rivals

We know how the Eagles' draft picks stack up, so here's a look at the rest of the NFC East:

New York Giants
The Giants surprised a lot of their fans by passing on Pittsburgh DT Aaron Donald and Notre Dame OL Zack Martin at No. 12 to select LSU WR Odell Beckham. And while I believe addressing either their offensive or defensive line was their top priority, it's hard to argue with taking a playmaker like Beckham.

The Giants lost Hakeem Nicks to the Colts this offseason, and giving Eli Manning more weapons may help him bounce back after an atrocious 2013 season. On the flip side, this draft was so deep at WR, New York may have been smart to grab either Donald or Martin at No. 12 and wait until the second or third round to load up on offensive weapons.

I loved their second-round selection, Colorado State offensive lineman Weston Richburg. He played center in college but can move out to guard if they need him to in the pros. Richburg was my top center in the draft and should start immediately.

They reached a bit for Syracuse DT Jay Bromley in the third round, but he should be able to contribute immediately as a run-stuffer.

Fourth-rounder Andre Williams, a RB out of Boston College, could be a workhorse in time, but may be a short-yardage back behind Rashad Jennings in the near future. Hard to not like a guy who ran for 2,177 yards in 2013.

The Giants failed to address their hole at tight end, but after the first four came off the board, I didn't see any candidates who would be much of an impact player.

The Giants' draft was solid and hinges on whether Beckham can make a big impact on an offense that often stalled out in 2013.

Washington Redskins
Redskins fans rejoice!

This was the last draft the 'Skins endured under the debilitating 2012 RG3 trade with St. Louis. But just to rub things in, with the picks the Rams got from Washington for the second overall pick in the 2012 draft (obviously used to draft Robert Griffin III), St. Louis was able to select the following players (thanks to some additional wheeling and dealing): DT Michael Brockers, CB Janoris Jenkins, LB Alec Ogletree, WR Stedman Bailey, RB Zac Stacy and OT Greg Robinson. A very nice haul indeed.

With that out of the way, despite not having their first-round pick (would have been second overall), the 'Skins came away with some decent pieces in some needed areas.

In the second round, the 'Skins traded down with the Cowboys from No. 34 (Dallas selected Boise St. defensive end Demarcus Lawrence) to No. 47 (and received Dallas' third-round pick, No. 78) and selected Stanford DE/OLB Trent Murphy. I have always liked Murphy just based on the tenacious play -- the guy just doesn't stop coming, and his 15 sacks in 2013 led the nation. But the more I watched him, the more I didn't think he would be a guy who could get to the QB consistently in the NFL. He's just not that quick off the ball, and most of his sacks were effort sacks.

But with Brian Orakpo most likely leaving next season, Washington's thought process is understandable. I just may have stood pat at 34 and taken Lawrence instead, but Murphy is the kind of player you want to battle with every week and could turn out to be a poor man's Ryan Kerrigan.

In the third round, the 'Skins addressed a porous offensive line by drafting Virginia tackle Morgan Moses (No. 66) and Nebraska guard Spencer Long (No. 78). I thought Moses had first-round talent; he should be able to step in at RT immediately, displacing the inconsistent Tyler Polumbus, and be a backup to LT Trent Williams as well.

Long, who has been injury-prone over the past two seasons, could replace Chris Chester at RG if he's completely healed from an MCL tear he sustained last season. I would have been more impressed if the 'Skins grabbed Mississippi State's Gabe Jackson instead (he went three picks later to the Raiders at No. 81).

The Skins' last pick of consequence, at least in my eyes, was Clemson CB Bashaud Breeland. A tough, stout corner, Breeland adds quality depth to a thin secondary. I thought Breeland could have gone as early as the late second round, so good value there.

The Redskins added good depth and two or three potential starters despite not having a first-round pick. Nothing sexy here, just solid across the board.

Dallas Cowboys
The Cowboys disappointed a lot of people by passing on Texas A&M QB Johnny Manziel at No. 16. Not only did they pass on perhaps the biggest wild card in the draft, but they also instead made the first-round's most boring pick in Notre Dame OT Zack Martin. But boring doesn't mean bad, and Martin should plug in to Dallas' offensive line either at RT or LG and make them a whole lot better. Jerry Jones actually made a smart decision here.

In the second round, Jones swapped second-round picks and gave up his third-round pick to Washington to select Lawrence at No. 34. I like Lawrence, and with all the top safeties off the board, grabbing one of the rare pass rushers in the draft made sense for them even if it meant paying a steep price.

The rest of Dallas' draft was a mixed bag. A reach in the fourth round for Iowa LB Anthony Hitchens, who they probably could have gotten much later in the draft, was followed by the acquisition of pick No. 148 from the Lions in exchange for No. 158 and No. 229 so they could select Pitt WR Devin Street.

I think they would have been much better off staying where they were and selecting either Princeton DT Caraun Reid or Wisconsin WR Jared Abbrederis. Baylor S Ahmad Dixon (No. 248) and Oregon CB Terrance Mitchell (254) in the seventh round could prove to be great depth picks.

The Boys got two nice pieces in the first two rounds in Martin and Lawrence, but with the number of picks they had I would have liked to have seen more guys who can make impacts sooner.

With realistic shot at 53-man roster, undrafted Myke Tavarres feels he fits Eagles' scheme well

With realistic shot at 53-man roster, undrafted Myke Tavarres feels he fits Eagles' scheme well

Some scouts and draftniks were surprised Myke Tavarres' name had not been called after the dust settled and all seven rounds were complete in May's NFL draft. At that point, the Eagles weren't about to let a potential diamond in the rough show up on another club's 90-man roster.

The Eagles reportedly gave Tavarres $95,000 in guaranteed money to sign, one of the highest sums awarded to an undrafted free agent in the NFL in 2016, and it wasn't difficult to understand why. Linebacker is a position of need for one thing, so much so there's an excellent chance a lesser-known prospect out of an FCS program like the University of Incarnate Word has an excellent shot at making the team.

Yet Tavarres is an impressive individual as well, both as an athlete and a person. You can learn a lot about his character based alone on the mantra he has tattooed on his arm.

"In high school I used to wrestle, and my coach before every big match, he would read me this quote, and this quote has gotten me through everything," Tavarres said at training camp this week. "It says, 'If you do not try, then you do not do, and if you do not do, then why are you here?' Pretty self explanatory."

And while Tavarres is serious about playing football, it's clear he has his priorities straight. While he declined to get into why exactly he transferred from Arkansas to Incarnate Word after one season, it certainly wasn't because he worried about being drafted or a career in the NFL at the time. It was what he felt was best for him.

"I actually had a close friend that played corner out there," Tavarres said, "and he said, 'You'd love it out here, the coaches are pretty relaxed. It'll be a good opportunity for you to go out there and just have fun and play the game.' So after that I decided to go there.

"Honestly, I wasn't even worried about the NFL when I got to Incarnate Word. I was more focused on getting my degree, finishing school. Then toward the middle of the season, they were like, 'Hey, you've got a pretty good shot to play in the NFL.' After that, I was like, 'Alright, let's go ahead and go for it.'"

It's also telling of his personality what Tavarres' attitude is toward going undrafted.

"I'm not too upset and I wasn't really that worried," he said. "I knew I was going to get an opportunity somewhere, and that's all I ever asked for was an opportunity."

As impressive as his determination is, you can learn a lot about Tavarres' physical ability just from looking at the numbers, too. As a senior — his only season with the program — he posted 110 tackles, 22½ tackles for loss and 8½ sacks. He was so versatile, he even saw a limited number of touches as a running back and kickoff returner.

Listed at 6-foot-1, 230 pounds, Tavarres also mentions he actually came into camp up to 240, not to mention he might be even faster than people think. At least he claims a trick of the stopwatch may have caused a sizable discrepancy in his 40-yard dash time compared to what is on the books from his pro day.

"It was a 4.7, but," Tavarress said, "realistically I found out after I was running, I moved my hand before I started running, and what my trainer and my agent had was a 4.4."

Not that he ascribes too much importance to the actual time anyway.

"People spend so much time worrying about 40-this, 40-that," he said. "If you can play ball, you can play ball."

The challenge now for Tavarres is picking up a defense he's never played in before. Perhaps unsurprisingly, he also says that's part of what attracted him to the Eagles. While he was used primarily as a pass-rusher in college, Tavarres believes his skillset is better suited for playing linebacker in a 4-3.

So far, Tavarres feels the most comfortable at strongside, where his speed and strength are valuable attributes for covering tight ends.

"It's been a lot harder for me than it would be for most guys because they've all played in a 4-3 scheme," Tavarres said. "I played in a 3-2, which is pretty much just a standard defensive end rushing the passer, so it's all been relatively new to me, but I'm adjusting and acclimating as much as I can.

"For a linebacker like me, I can play side-to-side, so that would be really good for me. That was really the most reason why I decided to come here."

The Eagles' lack of depth at linebacker didn't hurt either. Mychal Kendricks, Jordan Hicks and Nigel Bradham seem set as the starters, but the only backups with NFL experience currently on the roster are Najee Goode and Deonate Skinner. That leaves seventh-round pick Joe Walker, Tavarres and fellow undrafted rookies Quentin Guase and Don Cherry likely competing for at least one, possibly two spots.

All Tavarres wanted was an opportunity, and he has one here. He's also confident he knows what he has to do to take advantage of what's in front of him and make the 53-man roster.

"Hard work. Dedication. Special teams," Tavarres said, with the latter being what he hopes will help set him apart.

"My goal on every single special teams play is to be the first one down there and not just to get down there, but make the play, make the tackle."

Obviously, special teams will be a huge factor in the Eagles' decision, although the organization may have tipped its hand a bit with the nice bonus it paid Tavarres as far as what it thinks of his chances. Undeniably a bit raw, he has the talent and right attitude to play at the next level, which makes for one intriguing prospect to watch this summer.

Eagles trying out unique helmet camera for film practice

Eagles trying out unique helmet camera for film practice

Blake Countess had three eyes on Wednesday.

The first two were under his helmet, scanning the field in anticipation of throws coming from fellow rookie Carson Wentz.

The third was on top of his helmet.

The rookie safety wore a small cylindrical camera, about the width of a silver dollar, on the top left of his helmet — just above the Eagles’ logo — during the third practice of training camp. The footage from the camera will give the team a different vantage point while looking at practice film.

“Technology, you can't stay up fast enough with it,” head coach Doug Pederson said after practice. “Those are great devices to have. In fact, we used them in Kansas City with the quarterbacks. We've had them on their helmets before.

“It gives you an opportunity to kind of see from the players' vantage point where they're looking, where their eyes are. Are they in the right direction? Are they on the right reads? And defensively are [they] in the right spots? And then you can evaluate and help correct the player.”

On Wednesday, Countess was the only player wearing the camera, but the rookie said the team plans on using them more, eventually for receivers and quarterbacks.

How can it help Countess to get better?

“Eye progressions, just seeing where I’m looking at and being more disciplined with my eyes,” the sixth-round pick said. “Throughout the play, if your eyes are bad, you’re probably going to get beat, especially as a defensive back.”

Pederson said sometimes the helmet cams give back some shaky video, so using it on Countess was a test of sorts.

But the Chiefs used them for their quarterbacks and if the feedback from this preliminary camera is good, the Eagles might put them on the helmets of their quarterbacks soon.

“The thing is, too, with technology,” Pederson said, “if it helps you win football games, I'm all for it.”

As for Countess, the team told him about the camera on Tuesday and when he got into the locker room on Wednesday, there it was, attached to his helmet.

Why did they pick him?

“I don’t know,” he said with a laugh. “I wish I knew.”

Eric Rowe explains 'hiccups,' ready for fresh start in pads

Eric Rowe explains 'hiccups,' ready for fresh start in pads

Earlier this week, Doug Pederson admitted cornerback Eric Rowe had some “hiccups” during the spring, and seemed to indicate they stemmed from learning a new defense. 

Rowe says that wasn’t the problem at all.

“It wasn’t the new defense that was giving me whatever hiccups [Pederson] was talking about,” Rowe said on Wednesday as he reported for his second training camp (see Day 3 observations). “It was just, I was having trouble breaking on top of the routes, specifically the curl routes. But fade ball, deep post, digs, I didn’t have any trouble there. It was just curl routes. I just knew I had to work on it after the OTAs.”

Rowe, 23, said the problem was technical; he just needed to get his feet down quicker.

Whatever the problem, whatever the hiccups, it seems as though Rowe’s standing within the organization and on the depth chart isn’t what it once was.

Many thought he would be a starter in 2016, like he was at the end of 2015, but that wasn’t the way things were in the spring. Instead, Leodis McKelvin and Ron Brooks took those positions, and it looks like Nolan Carroll, returning from an injury, and rookie Jalen Mills, who hasn’t yet practiced in pads, are vying for playing time, too.

In back-to-back days earlier this week, Pederson and defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz failed to mention Rowe’s name while listing players at the cornerback spot. Coincidental omissions or a vocalized unofficial depth chart?

Rowe could possibly go from starter to deep bench player, but that’s not what he’s planning on.

“I know I had a little ups and downs in OTAs, but now the pads are coming on,” Rowe said. “I feel like it’s a fresh start for me and I’m just ready to get out here.”

Pads go on Saturday.

“Right now, I think I still stand in a good position (with the team),” Rowe said. “Football is about the game with pads on. Now we’re really about to see in a couple days when we put the pads on.”