NFL Draft: Saturday's prospect watch

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NFL Draft: Saturday's prospect watch

If you're an Eagles fan looking toward the 2012 draft, here are players to watch on Saturday:
Brandon Boykin, CBKR Georgia, No. 2

Auburn vs. Georgia (CBS, 3:30 p.m.)

With Asante Samuel grumbling and Dominique Rodgers-Cromarties subpar showing, the Eagles might be in the market for a CB come April. Boykin is a pure athlete that has the speed to play on the outside and quickness to play in the slot. His size isn't ideal (5-9, 181) and he gets nicked up often, but he has no fear and plays physical football. Boykin would also bring some much needed pep to a very moribund return game. He is extremely dangerous returning kicks, and would probably contribute more readily there early on in his career.

Marvin McNutt, WR Iowa, No. 7

Michigan State vs. Iowa (ESPN2, 12 p.m.)

Who knows what the Eagles are going to do with DeSean Jackson and his expiring contract, but if they do indeed let D-Jax hit the open market, receiving depth will need to be found. McNutt is a big receiver (6-3, 215), who can jump out of the building. Pair that leaping ability with soft hands and you've got the makings of a dangerous red zone target. McNutt has 57 catches for 959 yards and nine scores this season, and is coming into Saturday with three consecutive 100-yard receiving games. McNutt's lack of breakaway speed hurts his stock, but he should be off the boards by the middle of the third round.

T.J. McDonald, S USC, No. 7

Washington vs. USC (FX, 3:30 p.m.)

Nate Allen in 2009. Jaiqwuan Jarrett in 2010. The Eagles have been trying to find solid safety play in the early rounds since Brian Dawkins left two seasons ago. Well, the jury is still out as Allen can't stay healthy and Jarrett just got on the field for the first time last week. McDonald is more talented than both. He's an outstanding athlete and looks just as comfortable playing the deep ball as he does inside the box. McDonald has great size (6-3, 205) and bloodlines (his dad was former Pro Bowl safety Tim McDonald), and if the junior decides to come out, he'll be a surefire first-round pick. If the Eagles continue to play the way they have been, they may have a shot at him in the middle of the round.

Tech's Wilson is the real deal
Watched Virginia Tech RB David Wilson Thursday night and came away impressed again as he piled up 175 yards on 23 carries against Georgia Tech. Wilson cuts back as well as any back I've seen this year and just explodes up the field. I don't think his moves in the open field are quite like Shady McCoy's, but Wilson's the closest I've seen in college ball this season. The one thing he doesn't do though and maybe it's just the Tech offense is catch the ball. Wilson has only 16 catches this season.

Eagles owner Jeff Lurie rails against political polarization in Washington

Eagles owner Jeff Lurie rails against political polarization in Washington

Eagles owner Jeff Lurie isn't often very outspoken on football or political matters. 

He has apparently made an exception. 

Just a few days before Lurie is tentatively scheduled to speak to Philadelphia reporters while in Phoenix for the league's annual meetings, the Eagles owner authored a story for Time Magazine railing against political polarization in Washington.

Lurie has not spoken to reporters publicly since last March in Boca Raton, Florida, at the 2016 owners meetings. 

The owner's essay was published just hours after House Republican leaders pulled legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act on Friday afternoon. Lurie, for the record, donated money to Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign last year.

Lurie, the Eagles' 65-year-old billionaire owner, in the story, uses football as an example for which Washington should strive. 

Here's how Lurie begins the piece:

"What do football, political polarization and autism have in common? They all illuminate aspects of the human condition, explaining who we are, where we are headed and the hurdles along the way. As a sports team owner I rarely publicly discuss politics, but as a member of a family touched by autism, I often think about the unspoken millions of people who live with the daily challenges of this disorder."

Lurie then goes on to explain why football can act as a guide for Washington when it comes to united for the common good:

"What I have learned from football can be applied to society at large. Just as we intensely game-plan against an opponent in sports, we need to game plan for the reality and consequences of polarization. Extreme polarization is the opponent -- not each other. A football team is made up of players from a wide variety of backgrounds, experiences and political viewpoints. What unites them is grit, determination, and the desire to win. They join in a common goal and do what is necessary to transcend their differences for the greater good of their team.

"What unites Americans is far more negative. We are now in an age where communicating verifiable information becomes secondary to the goal of creating a common enemy that unifies people in fear, negativity and opposition. This masks our inability to solve serious domestic problems (poverty, violence and institutional racism to name three current examples) and diverts our attention from obvious suffering."

Lurie then writes that we, as Americans, have the "necessary resources" to tackle serious problems, like autism, but lack the leadership to put aside differences. 

The whole piece isn't very long and is worth reading in full to gain a better understanding of its context. 

Next week while in Phoenix, Lurie will surely be asked about what motivated him to write the piece. 

Eagles withdraw all but 1 rule proposal for owners meetings

Eagles withdraw all but 1 rule proposal for owners meetings

As the annual NFL meetings get set to kick off next week, the Eagles originally proposed four playing rule changes and a resolution that could have eventually led to bringing back Kelly green uniforms as an alternate option. 

But after getting feedback from the NFL's competition committee, the Eagles are withdrawing all but one proposal, according to league sources. 

The only one left would prohibit players from leaping over the line of scrimmage on kicking plays. For now, players are allowed to leap line as long as they don't make contact. That proposal, which the NFLPA has previously supported, seems likely to pass. 

That means the other three playing rule changes and the proposal to allow teams to wear helmets that would match their alternative jerseys won't be specifically discussed. 

Translation: No Kelly green jerseys yet. 

Among the 15 proposed playing rule changes the league released on Friday, teams were responsible for seven of them and the Eagles accounted for four of the seven. 

Just because a specific proposal won't be directly discussed, it doesn't mean that topic won't be discussed by the committee in Phoenix during next week's annual league meetings. 

For instance, one of the Eagles' proposals would alter the current replay system. While the Eagles' individual proposal won't be discussed, replays will be a topic of discussion during the meetings.