Nick Foles embracing new role as Carson Wentz's backup QB

Nick Foles embracing new role as Carson Wentz's backup QB

Nick Foles missed running onto the field at the Linc, he missed his teammates in the Eagles' locker room, he missed the City of Philadelphia. 

He even missed getting booed. 

"Crazy enough, you miss the boos from time to time," Foles said at the NovaCare Complex on Thursday afternoon. 

"I laugh just thinking about playing and getting booed but then going back and throwing a touchdown and hearing the eruption. It's the only place that you get something like that. It's a special atmosphere here."

Foles, the guy who Chip Kelly once infamously called the starting quarterback of the Eagles for "the next 1,000 years," is now the backup quarterback for at least the next two. 

Foles, 28, signed a two-year deal, reportedly worth $11 million, earlier this week to re-join the Eagles. He was once a third-round pick, who became a Pro Bowler, got traded, struggled and is now a backup where it all started. 

It's been a strange career so far for Nick Foles. 

"The journey has been up and down and sideways," Foles said. "But at the same time, where we are now, where we are, my wife and I, I wouldn’t change it for the world."

After his magical 2013 season, Foles got hurt in 2014 and played just eight mediocre games for the Eagles. Before the 2015 season, Chip Kelly shipped him to St. Louis as a part of the return in the Sam Bradford trade. Foles was the Rams' starting quarterback in 2015 but led his team to a 4-7 record in his 11 games. At his request, he was cut last July.  

Then he latched on with Andy Reid's Chiefs to be Alex Smith's backup in 2016, but Kansas City declined his option as free agency was about to kick off and Foles became a free agent. 

With no offers to go to a team where he could compete for a starting gig, Foles decided to re-join the Eagles and agreed to terms on Monday. 

"Everyone of us quarterbacks wants their opportunity to play again and be in the huddle," Foles said. "But at the same time, you can't have the mindset out there that far. In the moment, my role right now is to be the backup quarterback and help Carson in any way that I can. And I take that role with great pride and seriousness."

Foles got a taste of life as a backup last year in Kansas City, where he played in just three games and started just one. While he wasn't playing as much as he had in the past, Foles said he enjoyed the new role and responsibilities. Instead of huddling up with his teammates on game days, he worked with the scout team during the week and helped Smith prepare. 

But helping Smith, who has been in the league since 2005, will be much different than backing up Wentz, who is entering his second in 2017. Smith was able to help Foles learn as a quarterback. Now, Foles has to help Wentz grow.

The two have already been in contact and Foles praised Wentz as an athlete, quarterback and student of the game. Foles thinks his experience will help the guy who owns a job that once belonged to him. 

"The way it differs is, I've been a quarterback here," Foles said. "I've played a lot of games in the Linc. I've played a lot of games for the Eagles. So I know that Carson is going to go through different things throughout the years, so I can relate. I think when you have someone around you who can relate when you have a question or you're unsure about something. And if someone has been there and done it, it gives you more meaning when they give you an answer."

Foles certainly found success in Philadelphia. His 94.2 passer rating in his Eagles career ranks first in franchise history. And his seven-touchdown game against Oakland in 2013 is just one of eight seven-touchdown pass games in NFL history and just one of three in the modern era. Only Foles, Peyton Manning and Drew Brees have done it since 1969. 

To put that seven-touchdown game in perspective, Wentz threw seven touchdowns over the last nine games in his rookie season. 

And that seven-touchdown game was a part of an incredible season. Plenty will call it a fluke, and maybe it was, but his 2013 season under Kelly was absolutely magical. 

In that 2013 Pro Bowl season, Foles completed 64 percent of his passes with 27 touchdowns and just two interceptions and finished the year with a passer rating of 119.2.

Looking back four years later, what does Foles think of that season? 

"That player is still capable," Foles said. "That player is still here."

Now, that player is sitting on the bench. But at least he's doing it in Philly, boos and all. 

NFL Notes: Raiders reward Derek Carr with record $125 million deal

NFL Notes: Raiders reward Derek Carr with record $125 million deal

ALAMEDA, Calif. -- Derek Carr and general manager Reggie McKenzie never doubted the two sides could reach a long-term contract agreement to keep the quarterback with the Raiders before Carr's self-imposed training camp deadline.

Carr was open about how much he wanted to spend his entire career with the organization and after a decade searching for a franchise quarterback the Raiders weren't about to let a player they drafted and developed leave just as he was becoming a star.

So the two sides were able to agree on a five-year, $125 million extension that makes Carr the NFL's richest player, at least temporarily, and won't hinder the team's ability to give its other young stars like AP Defensive Player of the Year Khalil Mack, receiver Amari Cooper and guard Gabe Jackson new contracts before they hit free agency.

"I think that both sides wanted it to get done," Carr said Friday. "It was two family members just figuring out how to get along, and we did. We figured out a way to do it so that we have the opportunity to sign the other guys that I think are important to this organization. That was really important to me, not just to take every single dime that we could."

Carr will still get plenty. The $25 million per year in new money is the richest contract ever in the NFL, beating out the $24.8 million a year Andrew Luck got from Indianapolis. That could be surpassed with Detroit's Matthew Stafford and Washington's Kirk Cousins in line for new deals soon.

But Carr is not worried about that and the Raiders are pleased to have the face of their franchise under contract through 2022 as they prepare to move to Las Vegas in 2020.

"From the outset, both sides wanted the deal done, and I felt our guys did a great job getting together and hammering it out," McKenzie said. "We both wanted the same thing. That part was easy. We could tell that Derek wanted to be here. And we let him know, without a doubt, that we wanted him here" (see full story).

NFL: Prosecutors appeal Hernandez's voided murder conviction
BOSTON -- Massachusetts prosecutors on Friday appealed a court ruling that erased former NFL star Aaron Hernandez's murder conviction in the 2013 killing of a semi-professional football player.

Hernandez's conviction in the fatal shooting of Odin Lloyd was voided after the former New England Patriots player killed himself in prison. Under a long-held Massachusetts legal principle, courts typically erase the convictions of defendants who die before their direct appeals can be heard.

Bristol District Attorney Thomas Quinn III filed an appeal with a single justice of the Supreme Judicial Court on Friday. He called the rule "archaic" and said it "does not serve the public interest."

"A defendant who commits suicide should not be able to manipulate the outcome of his post-conviction proceedings to achieve in death what he would not be able to achieve in life," Quinn said.

Hernandez's appellate attorneys, John Thompson and Linda Thompson, could not immediately be reached for comment. A message was left at their office in Springfield.

Hernandez took his own life in April days after he was acquitted in a separate, 2012 double slaying in Boston.

The legal principle known as abatement ab initio, or "from the beginning," holds that a conviction should not be considered final until an appeal in the criminal case can determine whether mistakes were made that deprived the defendant of a fair trial.

In their appeal Friday, prosecutors argue that some states have moved away from automatically erasing convictions when defendants die before appeals can be heard. More than a dozen states allow appeals to continue even after death and only dismiss convictions when the appellate court finds that a new trial would have been warranted.

Prosecutors said courts should strike a balance between the rights of defendants and the rights of victims. Lloyd's mother fought back tears after a judge voided Hernandez's conviction in her son's killing.

Michael Vick's father arrested on drug-ring charges

Michael Vick's father arrested on drug-ring charges

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. — The father of former pro-football star Michael Vick has been arrested on charges of being involved in a drug ring.

The Virginian-Pilot reports that federal authorities arrested 55-year-old Michael Dwayne Boddie on Thursday. A federal indictment unsealed Wednesday in Newport News alleges that he and 11 others conspired to sell heroin.

Boddie is being held without bond until a Monday detention hearing. He was assigned a court-appointed attorney.

Lawrence Woodward, an attorney who's represented both men over the years, did not respond to requests for comment. The federal prosecutor's office declined to comment on the case beyond the charges.

Vick rose to stardom with the Atlanta Falcons before serving prison time for running a dogfighting operation. He played for the Eagles, Jets and Steelers before announcing his retirement in February.