On the rise? Roseman: 'Arrow's up' for Nate Allen

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On the rise? Roseman: 'Arrow's up' for Nate Allen

After watching Nate Allen awake from the doldrums last season and actually become a capable safety again, the Eagles believe the fifth-year pro is ready to take another step.

Maybe even fulfill that potential he had when they drafted him 37th overall in 2010.

At the owners meetings in Orlando on Monday, Eagles general manager Howie Roseman discussed the one-year deal Allen signed last week to rejoin the club he started 16 games for last year and the improvement Allen showcased under the new coaching staff.

Allen will have the chance to compete with second-year pro Earl Wolff -- and perhaps a draft pick -- to start opposite free-agent signing Malcolm Jenkins, giving the Eagles a tandem that they believe can be effective, if not prolific.

“It’s not going to be perfect at every position, obviously. But when you talk about Nate -- we had an opportunity to go back and watch Nate and see the growth,” Roseman said. “What we’re asking him to do is a lot different than what he was asked to do in the past.

“Obviously, all the other stuff is off the charts with Nate -- his work ethic, his character, his drive to try to be a better player. So you just kind of hope to see the growth continue in a young player, because he still is a young player.

“It’s interesting -- when you look at some of these free agents who got some big money, a lot of those guys didn’t really evolve until their fourth or fifth year. Some of those guys even had to go into last year taking one-year contracts in free agency and then got paid after that. That’s what you hope for with Nate.”

Allen didn’t have an outstanding 2013, but he played very steadily and limited negative plays. More importantly, he stayed healthy and started every game for the first time in his career.

He recorded his first interception since 2011 and his first sack since his rookie season, playing for the first time in coordinator Billy Davis’ hybrid 3-4 scheme. His tackling, abysmal the two prior years, improved dramatically.

The Eagles think Allen can make more strides with another round of spring and summer camps under Davis, Allen’s fourth different coordinator.

“Yeah. We think the arrow’s up and he’ll certainly benefit from having the same cast of characters around him in terms of coaches and scheme,” Roseman said. “So that’s what we’re looking for. I think it’s really important that we create competition everywhere.

“We continue to do that, and I think that’s another thing we did when we brought in Darren [Sproles] on the offensive side of the ball. We want to have a team that has competition at all these positions, so I wouldn’t rule anything out.”

With Jenkins, Allen, newcomer Chris Maragos and Keelan Johnson, the Eagles lack star power at safety as the NFL continues its trend toward pass-first offenses. But Roseman said the team would continue to explore upgrades at the position through free agency and the draft.

There’s no reason to think the Eagles won’t draft another safety if he’s the best prospect on their board when they pick.

The Eagles let big-ticket safeties, such as Jairus Byrd and T.J Ward, go elsewhere for big-time dollars and were more than content to bring in guys who they believe fit their philosophy and scheme without choking up cap space.

“You start 22 guys, and it’s such a team game that one player isn’t going to put you over the top in any way,” Roseman said. “We sit there and try to think of any example where just one specific player puts you over the top -- obviously the quarterback position is so important in this game, but at the other 21 positions, you look at it and we have to find fits. We have to find guys that we utilize in our scheme and are right fits for our scheme.

“For us, it’s all about making sure that the guys that we’re paying money to are fitting our scheme. Not just paying because they can do something well, but we’re not going to maximize their talents. We have a limited amount of resources -- we have a limited amount of picks, we have a limited amount of money to be able to build our team.

“And that’s what we’re trying to do. We’re trying to build our culture, trying to build a team. And obviously when you’re at this moment in time, sometimes it’s hard to see the complete picture. But we’re trying to execute it.”

CSNPhilly.com contributor Jeff Shain assisted with this story.

Eagles Injury Update: Mathews and Matthews to return to practice

Eagles Injury Update: Mathews and Matthews to return to practice

If you're searching for some good news following the Eagles' dismal 32-14 loss to the Bengals on Sunday afternoon, here it is. 

Jordan Matthews (ankle) and Ryan Mathews (knee) are going to return to practice this week, head coach Doug Pederson said on Monday. 

Ryan Mathews, who suffered an MCL sprain against Seattle, has missed the last two weeks. The Eagles averaged just 77 yards rushing in those two losses, going with Wendell Smallwood, Darren Sproles and Kenjon Barner. 

Jordan Matthews, who has been the Eagles' best and most consistent receiver this season, suffered an ankle sprain against the Packers and was inactive on Sunday against the Bengals. It was the first game he ever missed in college or in the NFL. 

Wideout Dorial Green-Beckham, who injured his midsection and got X-rays during the game, has an oblique contusion, according to Pederson. Green-Beckham is sore and will be held from practice on Wednesday, but Pederson expects him to be "OK" for the Washington game on Sunday. 

Pederson said right tackle Halapoulivaati Vaitai is "coming along," but isn't yet ready to return. 

"He's going to do a little more this week, not from a practice standpoint but from a rehab standpoint, and he's doing good," Pederson said. "But we'll see where he is again later in the week."

In Vaitai's absence, left guard Allen Barbre has shifted from left guard to right tackle and Stefen Wisniewski has replaced him at left guard. 

Doug Pederson admits 'not everybody' played hard in Eagles' loss

Doug Pederson admits 'not everybody' played hard in Eagles' loss

Doug Pederson’s press conference was humming along as expected on Monday morning, the day after the team’s 32-14 loss to the Bengals in Cincinnati. 

Like he did minutes after the game, Pederson again expressed the idea that the Eagles didn’t lose for lack of effort. 

“I didn’t see any quit in the guys,” he said several different ways throughout the 19-minute session with reporters. 

The effort’s there. There’s no quit. 

Those are the types of responses we’ve become accustomed to hearing from Pederson over the last couple of weeks after embarrassing losses. And it looked like that was how Monday was going to end, with that same message being repeated ad nauseum. 

Until Pederson made a shocking admission. 

Could he honestly say every one of his players played hard against Cincinnati?

“Not everybody,” he said. “Not everybody, and that's the accountability that I talk about. You know, I hold coaches accountable for that. I hold myself accountable for that because it all starts with me and I pride myself each week to make sure the guys are ready to go. 
 
“But at the same time, it comes down to a mentality by each individual player. You know, this is a business where we have to be ready to go every single weekend because every team in the league -- I mean, there's some teams that are better than others, obviously -- but for the most part, anything can happen each weekend.”
 
Not everybody. The admission of that fact is far more shocking than the reality. Fans who watched Sunday’s game will probably be able to pinpoint several plays where one or more Eagles might not have given full effort. 
 
But for a first-year head coach to come out and admit it in public is rare. Perhaps Pederson felt emboldened to say something because he’s been assured of his status within the organization (see story). On Monday, he said he “for sure” thinks his job is secure after this season based on reassurance from Jeff Lurie and Howie Roseman. 
 
While Pederson said it publicly, the conversation between him and his players about accountability will continue. It seems unlikely Pederson will take it a step further by cutting or benching players, but his team will definitely hear the message its head coach put out on Monday. 
 
While Pederson commented that “not everybody” played hard, it seems like he’s convinced that portion of the team is the minority. Overall, he’s still convinced that guys are buying in. The reason he gave was the feedback he’s been getting back from his leadership council (a group of veteran leaders he has depended on throughout the season). 
 
Earlier in the press conference, Pederson was asked about one play in particular, when Zach Ertz failed to block Bengals linebacker Vontaze Burfict as Carson Wentz scrambled for a 10-yard gain in the first quarter. The video shows Ertz making an effort to avoid the linebacker.
 
“Looking at the tape and watching where Carson was scrambling of course he was heading toward out of bounds and I think he just pulled off at that point,” Pederson said. “That’s all I can say. But I’m definitely going to ask him why.”

With a 5-7 record, the Eagles’ playoff chances are all but completely gone, so the last quarter of the season will be about effort, pride and finding out who wants to be back on the team in 2017. 

To end his press conference, Pederson was asked if this Eagles team needs to be “loved up” or if it’s time for some tough love.  

“I think it's both. I think it's both,” he said. “I think there's a level of that tough love. There's got to be that accountability that I was talking about. You know, I implore and I challenge the leaders of the football team to stand up and really not only hold themselves [accountable] but the rest of the team. Listen, it's not a panic move or anything like that, but just, ‘Hey, let's just make sure we're doing things right.’ Everybody just do things right, do their jobs, do their assignments, you know, and good things are going to happen. 

“Obviously, again, it starts with me, and I've got to make sure that I'm doing it right and I'm holding myself accountable, and as you mentioned earlier with Jeffrey and Howie, if they're holding me accountable and all that, that's where it starts, and then I relay that message to the assistants and on to the team.”