Sanchez winning battle of USC backups, so far


Sanchez winning battle of USC backups, so far

His shoulder is feeling much better, his comfort with the offense is where it needs to be and his second season should be the time when Matt Barkley makes his move up the depth chart.

But when the Eagles held their third and final practice Thursday of their first OTA, Barkley was in the same place he was last year as a rookie, staring up at two quarterbacks.

Nick Foles took the first-team reps, newcomer Mark Sanchez was the next guy up and only then did Barkley get his turn with the offense.

“It’s been like that [for the first two days], so it didn’t come as a surprise to me,” Barkley said. “I didn’t know what to expect [going into OTAs]. I just agreed with the coaches and assumed that they know what’s best for the team. So I’m just trusting them and keeping working hard and trying to make the most of my reps.”

Barkley, the second-year pro from USC, said he doesn’t invest much thought into spring depth charts or hierarchy, but his body language suggested that he isn’t thrilled to play third fiddle once again.

The same quarterback who destroyed Pac-12 conference records is stuck behind two other Pac-12 signal callers whose college careers weren’t as decorated as his.

One of them, Sanchez, just missed an entire season after injuring his shoulder last preseason with the Jets, who had already moved on from him after two disappointing seasons.

“He’s also an NFL vet and he’s a pro,” Barkley conceded. “He trains like one. So I don’t have a say in it, if that’s what you’re asking. I’m dealing with what I can do and that’s make the most of the reps I have.”

Sanchez, culprit of the infamous “butt fumble,” likewise dismissed his current position right behind Foles on the QB totem pole.

After undergoing surgery that forced him to the sidelines all of last season and then finding his walking papers early this offseason, Sanchez’s objective right now is to get his bearings straight in a new city and new offense.

“I don’t really care about that,” he said about taking second-team reps ahead of Barkley. “I’m competing against myself. I’m competing against the defense. The quarterbacks, we compete against ourselves in the weight room, in the classroom, on the field.”

Asked if he felt his confidence boosted by running with the second team, Sanchez said he’s “not putting too much into those things.”

“It doesn’t matter,” he added. “I’m absorbing the offense. I’m learning it the very best I can and I’m competing my ass off. That’s what I’ve got to do and that’s all I can control.”

Depth charts in May and June rarely look the same in July, August and September. Last year, Chip Kelly referred to his inaugural depth chart as a seating chart written in sand.

This year, Kelly said he’s more certain about some of his starters but cautioned again about reading too much into who’s running where.

Last year, first-round pick Lane Johnson started his OTAs on the second-string offensive line. By next camp, he was already atop the depth chart at right tackle.

“Like I said, I dont even lose sleep over it,” Sanchez said. “It’s not a big deal. I’m doing everything I can to help this team. If my role is going to be helping Nick get ready for the season, help Nick get ready for Week 1 or a preseason game, I’m going to be ready to do whatever they need me to do.”

Barkley’s arm strength is back to normal this spring, more than a year removed from the shoulder injury during his senior season at USC that lingered into his rookie camp with the Eagles.

Although he completed 61.2 percent of his passes on 49 attempts last year, Barkley was also picked off four times and didn’t throw any touchdowns in his three cameos. He was sacked three times and registered a 44.6 passer rating.

Maybe that’s why Kelly wasn’t ready to hand Barkley the No. 2 job off the bat, but Barkley’s velocity is back and the offense doesn’t feel like a foreign language anymore.

“It feels like my offense now,” Barkley said. “Last year, it was kind of like Oregon’s offense, it felt like. But this year it feels like the offense that I’ve been running for a while now. All the calls, all the checks, it just comes to you quickly without having to think about it.”

Sanchez seemed like an odd choice for Kelly, who was looking for a veteran to replace Mike Vick. Kelly places a high premium on quarterbacks who demonstrate repetitive accuracy and limited turnovers.

For his career, Sanchez has completed just 55 percent of his passes and has 69 interceptions in 62 starts. His 3.7 interception percentage ranks 27th among active NFL quarterbacks.

But one reason he signed on to play for Kelly is the appeal of the coach’s spread offense and ultra-fast tempo, which Sanchez thinks can cater to his strengths.

“It’s constantly like a two-minute drill,” he said. “They expect you to blink fast and think fast and move fast, react to things, anticipate. It’s fun. It feels like a fast break. It feels like when Steve Nash was running with the Suns, just dishing the ball. That’s really the way they view the quarterback. Be the point guard, dish it out and roll.”

Report: Eagles, 49ers discussing Torrey Smith trade

Report: Eagles, 49ers discussing Torrey Smith trade

Are the Eagles still looking to add a deep threat?

Well, according to a report Monday night by ProFootballTalk, the Eagles and 49ers have been in trade discussions about wide receiver Torrey Smith but no deal is currently imminent.

Eagles head coach Doug Pederson's receiving corps has lacked downfield playmaking throughout the team's 4-2 start. Eagles wideouts have just 10 total catches of 20 yards or more, and Jordan Matthews owns seven of them.

If Smith were dealt to the to the Eagles (which our own Paul Hudrick actually suggested last week), he would boost the team's big-play ability on the outside. The 27-year-old has struggled in two seasons with the 49ers, thanks in large part to San Francisco's abysmal play at quarterback. The 49ers are 6-17 over the past two seasons with Blaine Gabbert and Colin Kaepernick under center, both of whom have combined for 23 passing touchdowns to 19 interceptions in that span.

Smith, who has 46 catches for 862 yards and six touchdowns in 23 career games with the 49ers, was one of the NFL's better deep-ball wide receivers while with the Ravens from 2011-14. Among all wideouts with 50-plus catches in 2013, Smith was third in yards per catch (17.4) behind only Josh Gordon (18.9) and Calvin Johnson (17.8). That season, Smith put up career highs in catches (65) and yards receiving (1,128) to help Baltimore win the Super Bowl. The following season, Smith caught 11 touchdown passes.

In March 2015, Smith signed a five-year, $40 million contract with San Francisco. Through seven games in Chip Kelly's offense this season, Smith has 13 catches for 199 yards and two touchdowns.

Eagles bring back Taylor Hart after stint with Chip Kelly

Eagles bring back Taylor Hart after stint with Chip Kelly

The Eagles have brought back a familiar face to take Ron Brooks' roster spot.

On Monday, the team claimed defensive tackle Taylor Hart off waivers from San Francisco. Hart was just waived on Saturday by the 49ers, who claimed him after the Eagles waived him at final cuts.

So, Hart is coming back to Philly after a stint with Chip Kelly in San Francisco.

Hart, 25, played in one game for the 49ers this year. The Eagles are light at defensive tackle thanks to Bennie Logan's groin injury. While head coach Doug Pederson on Monday said Logan was getting better, the Eagles still brought in more depth by claiming Hart.

While still with the Eagles, Kelly had a hand in drafting Hart, an Oregon product, in the fifth round of 2014.

Hart worked hard this offseason to learn how to play in Jim Schwartz's aggressive 4-3 defense, which is very unlike the ones he had played in during college and in the NFL.

Brooks has been placed on IR after rupturing a quad tendon during Sunday's game against the Vikings. He'll have surgery this week.

In addition to adding Hart to the active roster, the Eagles also added cornerback Aaron Grymes to their practice squad.

Grymes, 25, was having an impressive training camp and preseason with the Eagles before injuring his right shoulder. He was waived shortly after that.

After coming out of the University of Idaho in 2013, Grymes didn't make an NFL team so he went to Canada. He ended up as a starter and All-Star on the Edmonton Eskimos and won a Grey Cup in 2015.

To make room for Grymes, the Eagles cut OL Matt Rotheram from the practice squad.