Snap counts: Jason Kelce, Malcolm Jenkins play most snaps in 2016 for Eagles

Snap counts: Jason Kelce, Malcolm Jenkins play most snaps in 2016 for Eagles

Jason Kelce and Malcolm Jenkins are the Eagles' iron men for the 2016 season. 

We'll start with a look at Kelce, who might have had an up-and-down season, but didn't leave the field once. He played all 1,133 offensive snaps in 2016 a year after playing all 1,156 snaps in 2015. 

Kelce hasn't missed an offensive snap since Week 10 of the 2014 season. That’s 39 straight games; it's been at least 2,795 straight snaps for the Eagles' center. 

On the other side of the ball, safety Malcolm Jenkins missed just one snap in 2016 and it came on that silly fake punt from the Browns in the opener. That means he played 1,019 of 1,020 and has missed just eight total snaps in his three years in Philly.

Jenkins didn't lead the league in snaps in 2016 after leading the league in 2014 and 2015. In his three years with the Eagles, he's played 3,407 of 3,415 total defensive snaps. He also plays special teams, which makes it even more impressive.

Here's a look at Eagles snap counts in 2016 by position. 

Quarterbacks
Carson Wentz: 1,127 snaps (99 percent)
Chase Daniel: 6 (1)

The only time Wentz came out of a game this season was against the Giants, when he needed to be evaluated for a concussion. He missed the tail end of one series and that was it. He returned for the next possession. Wentz went from a possible redshirt season to playing 99 percent of the Eagles' offensive snaps in 2016. 

Chase Daniel was in for just six plays. The backup is in Philly on a three-year deal worth $21 million. With each season being worth $7 million on average, that means each snap Daniel played this season was worth $1.167 million. 

Running backs
Darren Sproles: 511 (45)
Ryan Mathews: 287 (25)
Wendell Smallwood: 164 (14)
Kenjon Barner: 99 (9)
Byron Marshall: 75 (7)
Terrell Watson: 12 (1)

At 33 years old, Sproles led the way for the running backs and still played less than 50 percent. He got so many snaps because of his value on third downs as a receiver and pass protector. Sproles played just 393 snaps as a 32-year-old in 2015. 

Mathews was next with 287 after playing 245 snaps a year ago. Of Mathews' 287 snaps, he got the ball on 168 of them (58.5 percent). 

Smallwood got 164 snaps as a rookie and had 77 rushing attempts. His average of 4.1 yards per attempt was third on the team behind Sproles (4.7) and Mathews (4.3), but he became the first Eagles' rookie with an average over 4.0 yards per attempts (minimum of 70 attempts) since Bryce Brown in 2012. 

Receivers 
Nelson Agholor: 883 (78)
Jordan Matthews: 844 (74)
Dorial Green-Beckham: 642 (57)
Paul Turner: 154 (14)
Josh Huff: 134 (12)
Bryce Treggs: 126 (11)

Even with his mental health day against the Packers, Agholor still played more snaps than any other receiver on the roster. He played over 200 more snaps in his second season than his first, largely because of his high ankle sprain as a rookie. 

Matthews led the receivers in receptions, yards and touchdowns. Dorial Green-Beckham arrived during training camp and still played 57 percent of snaps. 

Tight ends
Zach Ertz: 851 (75)
Brent Celek: 439 (39)
Trey Burton: 331 (29)

Ertz ended up being the team's leading receiver in 2016. He led the Eagles in receptions, yards and touchdowns, surpassing Matthews in the final game. Ertz saw his snaps increase to 851 from 788 in 2015, but Celek's dropped. The veteran played 601 snaps in 2015, but just 439 in 2016. 

And Burton went from just 63 snaps in Chip Kelly's system last season to 331 this year. The Eagles used a lot of three-tight end sets. 

Offensive line
Jason Kelce: 1,133 (100)
Jason Peters: 1,100 (97)
Brandon Brooks: 991 (87)
Allen Barbre: 619 (55)
Stefen Wisniewski: 607 (54)
Halapoulivaati Vaitai: 423 (37)
Lane Johnson: 407 (36)
Isaac Seumalo: 335 (30)
Matt Tobin: 100 (9)
Dillon Goron: 2 
Josh Andrews: 1

We already got into Kelce, but it's probably even more important to realize that Peters played 1,100 snaps this season. He was back to 97 percent of the Eagles' snaps like he was in 2014. In 2015, he seemed to be constantly injured and played just 65.8 percent. Doug Pederson did a masterful job of managing Peters this season.

Even with his two last-minute absences because of his battle with anxiety, Brooks managed to play 991 snaps (87 percent) and seemed to be a pretty good free-agent acquisition. So did veteran Wisniewski, who played 54 percent of the team's total offensive snaps after being signed on a one-year deal. 

Rookie Halapoulivaati Vaitai and Isaac Seumalo got plenty of experience in 2016 (see story).  

Defensive line
Fletcher Cox: 773 snaps (76 percent)
Brandon Graham: 764 (75)
Connor Barwin: 713 (70)
Bennie Logan: 467 (46)
Vinny Curry: 435 (43)
Beau Allen: 412 (40)
Destiny Vaeao: 268 (26)
Marcus Smith: 218 (21)
Steven Means: 36 (4)
Bryan Braman: 3
Taylor Hart: 0

No surprise here, but Cox led the way for the defense, even with a rotation. Brandon Graham, who wasn't even expected to be a starter at the beginning of the spring, ended up leading the Eagles' defensive ends, ahead of Connor Barwin.

Vinny Curry, who signed a five-year, $46 million extension this past offseason, played just 43 percent of the team's defensive snaps.

Solid playing time for undrafted rookie Vaeao out of Washington State. He played a significant role, while Taylor Hart was brought back by the Eagles but never made it onto the field. 

At defensive end, Marcus Smith played 218 snaps as opposed to 127 in 2015. 

Linebackers
Nigel Bradham: 990 (97)
Jordan Hicks: 971 (95)
Mychal Kendricks: 273 (27)
Stephen Tulloch: 69 (7)
Najee Goode: 2
Kamu Grugier-Hill: 1

Big numbers for Bradham and Hicks, who spent most of the season on the field together in the nickel package. They rarely left the field. Bradham has just one year left on his contract but hopes to be around Hicks for a long time.

Kendricks was relegated to being the team's WILL in the base package, which meant just 273 snaps. He was clearly frustrated by this, especially after he was already frustrated by playing 628 snaps in 2015. 

Defensive backs
Malcolm Jenkins: 1,019 (100 percent)
Rodney McLeod: 1,014 (99)
Nolan Carroll: 910 (89)
Jalen Mills: 661 (65)
Leodis McKelvin: 587 (58)
Jaylen Watkins: 388 (38)
Ron Brooks: 235 (23)
Terrence Brooks: 3
Chris Maragos: 1
C.J. Smith: 1
Aaron Grymes: 0
Dwayne Gratz: 0

We know Jenkins doesn't leave the field, but for the second straight year, his safety partner was right there with him. Walter Thurmond played 99 percent of snaps last year and free-agent pickup McLeod did it this year. 

Carroll led the way for the corners with 910 snaps. He's now a free agent. Mills played 661 snaps as a rookie and veteran McKelvin battled through a hamstring injury to eventually play 587. 

Brooks played 23 percent of the team's total snaps, but it would have been much, much higher had he not gotten injured in the Vikings' game. Even though the torn quad cut his year short, his 235 defensive snaps were a career high. His previous high was 162 as a rookie in 2012. 

NFL Notes: Andy Reid doesn't believe costly hold on Chiefs was worth flag

NFL Notes: Andy Reid doesn't believe costly hold on Chiefs was worth flag

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Chiefs coach Andy Reid doesn't believe the holding penalty on left tackle Eric Fisher that cost Kansas City a tying 2-point conversion against Pittsburgh on Sunday night should have been called.

After watching film of the decisive play in the Steelers' 18-16 playoff victory, Reid said Monday that "I don't want to be fined any money, but I'd lean a different way."

Fisher appeared to hook Steelers pass rusher James Harrison on the conversion attempt with less than 3 minutes left in the game.

But the play was not cut-and-dried: Harrison dipped especially low and may have been losing his balance, and he likely would not have gotten to the quarterback anyway.

Still, the flag negated the successful 2-point conversion. And when the Chiefs tried again from the 12-yard line, Alex Smith's throw fell incomplete and the Steelers were able to run out the clock.

PATRIOTS: McDaniels staying on as OC
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -- Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels expressed appreciation for the opportunity to interview with the San Francisco 49ers but says for now he will remain in New England.

He said during a conference call Monday that the decision was what's "best for my family and myself" and that he will stay with the Patriots to focus on this year's playoffs and finish out the season "however it turns out."

McDaniels, who was a head coach with the Denver Broncos in 2009 and 2010, interviewed with the 49ers during the Patriots' bye to open the playoffs. He also interviewed with the Jacksonville Jaguars.

Both McDaniels and Patriots defensive coordinator Matt Patricia have been candidates for teams with open head coaching jobs this offseason after helping lead the Patriots to 14-2 regular season.

New England beat the Houston Texans 34-16 in the divisional round and will host the Pittsburgh Steelers in Sunday's AFC championship game.

SEAHAWKS: Carroll says Sherman played with MCL injury
RENTON, Wash. -- Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said on his radio show Monday morning that cornerback Richard Sherman played the second half of the season with an MCL injury in his knee.

Carroll told KIRO-AM that Sherman's injury was significant and it was "stressful" for Sherman to play with the injury.

Carroll did not specify which knee was injured, but said it was similar to Russell Wilson's sprained MCL suffered early in the season in that Sherman could play with the injury.

Sherman was not listed on any injury/practice report this season with a knee injury.

Any practices he missed were listed with the "NIR" -- not injury related -- designation with the exception of Week 12 against Tampa Bay when he was listed with an ankle injury.

Carroll said he had a "big meeting" with Sherman in regards to a tumultuous season for the cornerback that included two sideline blowups during games. "He has some regrets," Carroll said.

TITANS: Former Temple coach Jackson hired as WR coach
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- The Tennessee Titans have hired Frisman Jackson as their new wide receivers coach and Craig Aukerman as assistant special teams coach.

The Titans announced the moves Monday.

Jackson joins the Titans from Temple where he was passing game coordinator this past season and wide receivers coach the past two seasons. Jackson also coached at North Carolina State, Northern Illinois, Akron and Western Illinois.

Titans offensive coordinator Terry Robiskie also coached Jackson when he was a wide receiver for four seasons with the Cleveland Browns.

Aukerman spent the past four seasons coaching the Chargers' special teams, the most recent as special teams coordinator, and has coached with the Jaguars and Broncos. He also coached at Kent State, Miami (Ohio), Western Kentucky and Findlay.

Eagles Stay or Go Part 1: Nelson Agholor to Kenjon Barner

Eagles Stay or Go Part 1: Nelson Agholor to Kenjon Barner

In the first of our 12-part offseason series examining the future of the Eagles, Reuben Frank and Dave Zangaro give their opinions on who will be and who won't be on the roster in 2017. We go alphabetically — Part 1 is Nelson Agholor to Kenjon Barner.

Nelson Agholor
Cap hit: $2.13M

Roob: The first one is one of the most intriguing ones. It’s easy to just say, “Get rid of all the receivers except Jordan Matthews and start over!” And tempting, too. But the real world doesn’t work like that. Agholor would count a couple million more against the cap if the Eagles release him than if they keep him, so that’s one compelling reason to give him another year to try to find his way. And then there’s the simple fact that you can’t add four new wide receivers in one cap-strapped offseason, so somebody other than Matthews has to stay. And the biggest reason to keep Agholor around for another year is simply because somewhere lurking inside there may be a capable NFL wide receiver and the Eagles need to be absolutely sure a former first-round pick isn’t going to help them before cutting him loose so he can go to New England and catch 88 passes for 1,373 yards and make a Pro Bowl and win a Super Bowl ring. Maybe with a new position coach it will click in Year 3. I doubt it, but the Eagles have to find out. 

Verdict: STAYS

Dave: You guys aren’t going to like this, but Agholor is going to be an Eagle in 2017. No, he probably doesn’t deserve it and has been a complete disaster of a first-round pick, but it would actually cost the Eagles more to cut him than it would to keep him on the team thanks to the way these rookie deals are structured. Now, the Eagles obviously need to upgrade the receiver position, so even while Agholor will be back for the 2017 season, he shouldn’t have the same starter-type role. If he does, the Eagles have done a terrible job at upgrading one of their worst positions. After two years, it really doesn’t look like Agholor will ever play up to his first-round draft status. Now, it’s about trying to get something out of him, making him at least a competent backup. 

Verdict: STAYS

Beau Allen
Cap hit: $705K

Roob: Allen played 40 percent of the defensive snaps this year as the third defensive tackle, and he played pretty well. Nothing spectacular, but pretty steady. Depending on what happens with Bennie Logan in free agency, Allen could be asked to start next year, and he can probably handle it. The Eagles would still need a third D-tackle to rotate in there, and I’d be careful about increasing Allen’s snap count too much beyond 50 percent. But he’s a good effort guy who's durable, solid and cheap. 

Verdict: STAYS

Dave: There was clearly a dropoff this year when Bennie Logan went down and Allen came in to replace him. Logan is a good pass rusher and a good run stuffer. Allen doesn’t have the same impact as a pass rusher. But he still played well in 2016 and there’s no reason to get rid of him now, especially with how little he gets paid. If Logan doesn’t return, there’s a decent chance Allen will be a starter. 

Verdict: STAYS

Josh Andrews
Cap hit: $615K

Roob: Andrews is going into his fourth NFL season and has never played a snap on the offensive line. He must have something going for him to stick around under two head coaches without playing a snap. The Eagles have some depth in the interior of the offensive line, but Andrews is a Jeff Stoutland favorite, and I’m going to guess he keeps him around for another year. 

Verdict: STAYS

Dave: Andrews has been with the Eagles for a while now and still hasn’t played a role on offense. The team seems to really like him, but he was only active this year when other injuries came up. I think the Eagles continue to draft and bring in new linemen.

Verdict: GOES

Rasheed Bailey

Roob: Bailey’s a great kid with a great story, a Philly native, played Division III ball at Delaware Valley College in nearby Doylestown. I’d love to see him make it, but the Eagles need real change at wide receiver, a genuine infusion of speed, size and ability, and Bailey just isn’t the kind of upgrade the Eagles need. Hope I’m wrong. I’d love to see the kid come out of nowhere and be a player, but the odds are overwhelmingly against him. 

Verdict: GOES

Dave: This spring, Bailey and Paul Turner should be on the same football field, which will make the city implode, so there’s no point to even continuing this list. Seriously, though, Bailey probably wouldn’t have been any worse than some of the Eagles’ wideouts this year. Still, he has an uphill battle ahead of him. 

Verdict: GOES

Allen Barbre
Cap hit: $1.95M

Roob: Barbre turns 33 this offseason, but he comes fairly cheap. He can play guard or tackle, and he seems to be another Stoutland favorite. I don’t want Barbre to be a starter next year. The Eagles need to get younger, stronger and more athletic up front. Depending on what happens with Jason Kelce, I’d expect Isaac Seumalo to start somewhere – either center or left guard. But I’m fine keeping Barbre around as a versatile backup who can fill in anywhere but center. 

Verdict: STAYS

Dave: The Eagles could choose to cut Barbre and save $1.7 million, but it’s probably not worth doing it for that little bit of money. He's not nearly as good at tackle but he can play guard and his versatility is something NFL coaches really love. Barbre should be back next season, but not necessarily as a starter. Keep him around to push Isaac Seumalo, but eventually Seumalo should be able to take over the left guard spot. 

Verdict: STAYS

Kenjon Barner
Restricted free agent

Roob: Barner is a strange case. He made plays every time he got a chance, but he rarely got a chance. And the further along into the season we got, the fewer chances he got. Barner clearly has talent, and the Eagles clearly need to rebuild the running back position, but it sure seems like the coaches don’t like Barner. Heck, he was inactive against the Redskins a week after a 61-yard kickoff return. Barner averaged 4.8 yards per carry and 30.8 yards per kickoff return on a team with very few weapons, yet the coaches seemed to go out of their way to not play him. He was only the seventh NFL player since 1980 to average 4.8 yards per carry and over 30 yards per kick return. It’s obvious he can play. It’s equally obvious the Eagles have no interest in keeping him. 

Verdict: GOES 

Dave: Barner has barely seen the field over the last two years with the Eagles and during that time, the team could have really used a new running back. While many fans look at Barner and wonder why he hasn’t gotten more of an opportunity, it’s become clear that this coaching staff just doesn’t think all that much of him. I expect the Eagles to place a right of first refusal (lowest) tender on the restricted free agent, but he’d then have to fight his way onto the team and I’m not so sure about his chances. 

Verdict: GOES