This time, Eagles' Musgrave has talent to work with

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This time, Eagles' Musgrave has talent to work with

In August of 1998, the Colts released veteran quarterback Bill Musgrave after he was beaten out by Kelly Holcomb in a training camp battle to back up rookie Peyton Manning.

Two months later, Musgrave improbably found himself as the Eagles' de facto offensive coordinator.

Musgrave returned to the Eagles this year to replace Bill Lazor as quarterbacks coach after Lazor was named the Dolphins' offensive coordinator.

These days, Musgrave is a grizzled veteran offensive coach whose job is to work with Nick Foles and the other quarterbacks on a playoff team bursting with offensive talent.

Sixteen years ago, things were a bit different.

The Eagles didn’t have Foles; they had Rodney Peete, Ty Detmer and Bobby Hoying. They didn’t have Chip Kelly running the offense; they had Dana Bible. And they didn’t have LeSean McCoy; they had a running back named Duce Staley.

“It was a difficult situation for Bill,” said Staley, now on Kelly’s staff with Musgrave. “But like the true champ that he is, he was able to jump in there and kind of keep it rolling.”

Musgrave’s first Eagles career lasted just five months. He was hired in August of 1998 as an anonymous entry-level quality control coach soon after the Colts released him, and he was fired along with head coach Ray Rhodes and most of his staff in January.

In between, he was at the helm of one of the worst offenses ever assembled.

“I learned a lot that year,” said the soft-spoken Musgrave. “I learned a lot about the men on that team. The record wasn’t what any of us wanted, especially Coach Rhodes, but it was great to work for Ray Bob, and great to be around those players.

“They never quit, never quit fighting, and stayed competitive throughout. ... It was an experience that I learned from. I learned from all my experiences, and I’m thankful for all of them.”

In 1995 and 1996, the Eagles went to the playoffs under Rhodes, with Jon Gruden running the offense. But by 1998, Gruden was gone, Bible was the overmatched offensive coordinator, there was little talent remaining on offense, and the Eagles found themselves with one of the worst offenses in NFL history.

Those 1998 Eagles scored 12 or fewer points in 10 of 16 games and finished the season scoring just 161 points.

No NFL team in the last 20 years has scored fewer points.

Six weeks into the season, with the Eagles 1-5 and getting outscored by an average of 25-11, Rhodes shuffled his coaching staff, demoting Bible and without changing his title, making Musgrave the offensive coordinator and play caller.

Two months after his playing career ended.

Things didn’t get much better. The Eagles went 2-8 with Musgrave running the offense, averaging 9.2 points the rest of the season.

Musgrave went on to spent two years with the Panthers, then two years at Virginia, before stints with the Jaguars, Redskins, Falcons and Vikings.

Now he’s back with the Eagles, 16 years after being part of the NFL’s sixth-lowest-scoring offense since 1960.

“You rememeber the season we were going through,” Staley said. “I remember the things we were going through. He came straight out of training camp to our staff. He wasn’t that far removed from being a player.

“He was a quality control guy, had some West Coast [offense] background [with the 49ers], so he brought that to the table, and he was a teacher.

“That was a tough year, but Bill ... you know if a guy has it or not, and he’s had it since Day 1.”

That had to be an incredibly difficult year for Musgrave. He wasn’t even with the Eagles in training camp, but by Week 7 he was being asked to call the plays.

But if it left him with a bad taste in his mouth, he isn’t letting on.

“Every season in the NFL is challenging,” he said. “We were putting our best foot forward each and every week. I was really proud of that group because they kept fighting.”

That was a remarkable coaching staff for a 3-13 team. Sean Payton and John Harbaugh both went on to win Super Bowls as head coaches, Emmitt Thomas is a Hall of Famer, Mike Trgovac is a terrific defensive coach, Juan Castillo was a highly regarded offensive line coach, and so on.

“We had a terrific staff,” Musgrave said. “We all worked together. Sean Peyton was the quarterbacks coach, Juan Castillo was here, had just gotten run over by the golf cart, Emmitt Thomas being the defensive coordinator, and Danny Smith coaching the linebackers and John Harbaugh doing the special teams.

“I just think the world of Ray Bob and I learned a lot. I wouldn’t trade the expreience for anything. Not at all. I felt like we had a good coaching staff and good players. We definitely wanted to win more games, that’s for sure.”

These days, Musgrave has a quarterback who threw nearly twice as many touchdowns in 10 starts last year than that entire 1998 team scored all year. He’s with an offense that set records for most yards and points instead of fewest. And now he’s a veteran coach with a decade and a half of experience instead of a recently retired quarterback just starting out.

“It’s a tremendous organization, tremendous coaching staff, and they have talent on the football field,” Musgrave said.

“To see what they did last year -- winning seven of the last eight and have momentum going into the playoffs -- I feel like it’s a program that I can contribute to and also can learn from at the same time.

“I was excited to [come here and] learn this system, learn this culture, be a contributing factor on a team that’s really on the rise.”

Nigel Bradham's trial date for battery charge moved to April

Nigel Bradham's trial date for battery charge moved to April

Eagles linebacker Nigel Bradham was originally scheduled to be in court at 9:30 a.m. in Miami on Tuesday for the beginning of his trial on a felony battery charge. 

Now, that trial won't be until April. 

A motion for continuance was filed and the new trial date is set for April 10, according to the Miami-Dade State State Attorney's Office. Eagles OTAs will begin in May. 

The felony charge stems from a July 25 incident in Miami, when the 6-foot-2, 241-pound Bradham allegedly assaulted a hotel employee. The altercation reportedly arose from the length of time it took 50-year-old hotel employee Jean Courois to bring Bradham's group their beach umbrella. 

Bradham pleaded not guilty and has said he "most definitely" expects his name to be cleared from this incident.

This was the first of two arrests for Bradham since July. He was arrested coming home from Miami from the bye week after he tried to pass through airport security with a loaded gun in his backpack. 

After the second arrest, defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz famously said, "You do dumbass things, pretty soon, you’re going to be labeled as a dumbass." 

Bradham, 27, signed a two-year deal to join the Eagles last offseason and proved to be a good investment on the field. He played 97 percent of the defense's snaps and played at a high level as the team's starting SAM linebacker. He will have a base salary of $3.5 million this year, with a cap hit of $4.25 million. 

Report: Eagles considering moving on from Jason Kelce

Report: Eagles considering moving on from Jason Kelce

According to a report, Jason Kelce might have already played his final game in an Eagles uniform. 

The team is considering "moving on" from the veteran center by way of trade or outright release, according to PhillyVoice's Jimmy Kempski.

Kelce, 29, has a cap hit of $6.2 million in 2017 and the Eagles could save $3.8 million by cutting him after a disappointing 2016 season. He's still under contract through the 2020 season, but the Eagles could elect to move on without serious salary cap implications. 

In November, Kelce gave a very honest assessment of his play: “I think that I quite frankly need to do a better job. That’s what it comes down to. I love playing in this city, I love playing in this organization, and if I’m going to keep doing that, I have to do a better job.”

The obvious choice to replace Kelce, if the Eagles decide to go this way, would be 2016 rookie Isaac Seumalo. The third-round pick played six positions last year but did not play a single snap at center, which might be his most natural spot. 

Seumalo didn't play at center because for the second straight season, Kelce didn't miss a single snap. He played all 1,133 snaps in 2016 and hasn't missed a play in the last 39 games. Kelce was a sixth-round pick by the Eagles out of Cincinnati in 2011.