Trade-happy Eagles look to make more moves

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Trade-happy Eagles look to make more moves

At the end of the second day of the NFL draft, the Eagles had made three total picks, none from their original slot.

Surprised? You shouldn’t be.

When you combine general manager Howie Roseman’s perpetually itchy draft trigger finger with this year’s dizzying swapping spree across the league, the ingredients were in place for the Eagles to come away from this draft with more than the six picks they took into it.

As it currently stands, the Eagles are slated to make four more selections Saturday -- the fourth- and fifth-rounders they acquired from Houston and the fifth- and seventh-rounders of their own. The fourth-rounder, the 101st overall pick, will open the third and final day.

But don’t get too excited about the leadoff spot. Chip Kelly already dropped hints that he’s ready to move again.

“I thought we really did a good job of putting ourselves in position [for Saturday],” Kelly said after taking receiver Josh Huff in the third round (see story). “We have the first pick [Saturday] morning, which is an interesting pick because I think everybody thinks overnight who they like, so sometimes it’s got a little bit more (trade) value.”

Given the supreme talent of this year’s draft -- it’s been called the deepest in decades -- skeptics may question why the Eagles so willingly passed on picking twice in the third, even as high-profile players tumbled to 83rd, where they were supposed to pick before trading with Houston.

The Texans then took mammoth Notre Dame defensive tackle Louis Nix, a 340-pound galoot who might have helped the Eagles in January, when they were getting steamrolled up front in a playoff loss to the Saints at the Linc.

Some analysts considered the former Irish lineman a top-40 pick. Kelly admitted that Nix could have fit the team’s defensive scheme.

Then why pass for lower-rated prospects?

“I don’t think it’s necessarily that way, because not everybody sees it the way we see it, or we don’t see it the way they see it,” Kelly said. “I don’t think we went back far. We really feel having the top pick [Saturday] morning has a little bit more value.

“So, really, when you go back to the top of (round) four, you’ve gone back to the end of the three. The way we look at it kind of conceptually is, ‘I can take him with this pick or if I back up maybe he’s still here and I get him.’ So you’re getting a 2-for-1 is what you’re trying to do. Now, sometimes it doesn’t always work that way because the risk
is when I back up, he gets picked.”

The Eagles already played the game and lived to tell. They moved down in the first round, from 22 to 26, still hoping to land pass rusher Marcus Smith despite the four-slot drop.

They held their breath when the Chiefs, picking 23rd, took Auburn pass rusher Dee Ford. It easily could have been Smith.

“So you’re gambling a little bit,” Kelly said, “kind of playing with the house’s money.”

If they hold still Saturday -- fat chance of that -- the Eagles will pick 101st, 141st, 162nd and 237th. Those might not sound like attractive slots, especially knowing they surrendered an 83rd overall, but Kelly insisted that there’s more than enough talent left on the board.

”There’s guys right now that we still have rated in the third round that are there that will be there [Saturday] morning when we wake up and we make our first selection [in the] beginning of the fourth round,” he said. “But we picked up another pick, so we got an extra body.”

Options for Eagles in Rounds 4-7 of NFL draft

Options for Eagles in Rounds 4-7 of NFL draft

Here is a breakdown of players that should interest the Eagles on Saturday, the final day of the NFL draft. The Eagles have five more picks left — two in the fourth and one in the fifth, sixth and seven.

Options in the fourth and fifth round

Samaje Perine, RB, Oklahoma
Perine is an old school power back. He'd be a great complement to Darren Sproles and Wendell Smallwood although not necessarily a fit in this offense.

Jamaal Williams, RB, BYU
Williams has ideal size but not breakaway speed. He also has good vision and cutback ability.

Wayne Gallman, RB, Clemson
The forgotten man in Clemson's star-studded offense. Gallman is tough and versatile with the ability to catch the ball out of the backfield.

Anthony Walker, LB, Northwestern
Walker had a breakout sophomore season but gained too much muscle the following offseason. If the 2015 version returns, he could be a solid player.

Shelton Gipson, WR, West Virginia
Gipson is a one-trick pony but his speed is legit. The Eagles could use a young burner.

Julie'n Davenport, OT, Bucknell
Jason Peters can't play forever. Davenport dominated at Bucknell. He's still a bit of a project, but he has tools to work with.

Roderick Johnson, OT, Florida State
Before the season, Johnson was a player to keep an eye on as a fringe first-rounder. He struggled at times this season but is still athletic and intriguing.

Jaleel Johnson, DT, Iowa
Johnson really flashes at times. Other times, his pad level is too high and he loses to offensive linemen despite outmuscling them.

Options in the sixth and seventh rounds

Chad Wheeler, OT, USC
Wheeler has had issues on and off the field but has shown flashes of being a decent tackle. He may not have the athleticism to hang at left tackle at the next level.

Charles Walker, DT, Oklahoma
He's had concussion issues and questions about his passion. But when Walker is in the lineup and focused, he can play.

Jalen Reeves-Maybin, LB, Tennessee
Reeves-Maybin is undersized but instinctive and fast. At worst, he becomes a special team's ace.

Tedric Thompson, S, Colorado
Thompson is a ball hawking safety, pulling in seven interceptions last season. It's not a position of need, but again, Thompson could help out on special teams and maybe develop into something more.

Eagles draft CB Rasul Douglas with 3rd-round pick

Eagles draft CB Rasul Douglas with 3rd-round pick

Eagles Draft Tracker

The Eagles doubled down on cornerbacks on Day 2.

The round after taking Washington's Sidney Jones in the second, the Eagles took a cornerback who can actually play this season, selecting West Virginia cornerback Rasul Douglas with their third-round pick (99th overall).

The Eagles had the 99th pick after the trade with the Ravens to get Timmy Jernigan. In that trade, the Eagles gave up the 74th pick and took back the 99th. They thought Douglas was a player they would miss out on because of the move.

Luckily for them, he was still available at 99.

"It was a long way to go from (second-round pick) 43 to 99 but we feel that this guy fits our system, tremendous ball skills, length, and someone who really was on our radar for a long time and had a really good process including at the Senior Bowl," Eagles VP of football operations Howie Roseman said.

The Senior Bowl in Mobile, Alabama, was where the Eagles really started to like Douglas. While he was on their radar before, after being scouted by East Coast scout Ryan Myers, they were very impressed in Mobile.

"The thing that really stood out at his week at the Senior Bowl, you probably hear me talk about it all the time, this guy is tough," VP of player personnel Joe Douglas said. "And very competitive. You saw it all week. Every rep was like the last rep he was playing. I love the way this guy competes."

Rasul Douglas, who ran a 4.59 time in the 40 at the combine, had eight interceptions in the 2016 season. While that 40 time is slower than ideal, Roseman praised Douglas' 10-yard split and said his length and ball skills help to make up for it.

The 6-foot-2, 203-pound corner was once a junior college player who became a first-teamer on the All-Big 12 team. At 6-2, Douglas is the Eagles' tallest corner by two inches. In the past, defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz has used smaller CBs.

While Douglas will be able to play early this season unlike Jones, the Eagles claim that wasn't the reason they came back with another cornerback pick so quickly.

"It didn't matter the position, it was just the ability to pick the best player," head coach Doug Peterson. "And it just so happened it fit a need and we were fortunate there. This is a good player coming in here."

The last time the Eagles took two corners within the first three rounds was in 2002 when they double-dipped by taking Lito Sheppard in the first round and Sheldon Brown in the second.

This is the first time since 2012, the Eagles have picked a defensive player three times to start a draft.

The Eagles took defensive end Derek Barnett in the first round (43) and cornerback Jones in the second (43).

The draft will wrap up Saturday when the Eagles have five more picks in the fourth through seventh rounds. They have two in the fourth (118, 139) and one in the fifth (155), sixth (194) and seventh (230).

A huge need the Eagles have not addressed yet is at the running back position. Pederson said there are still one or two guys on the board who they like. A key for the Eagles is a back with three-down potential.