Bobby Clarke: The big draft risk that paid off


Bobby Clarke: The big draft risk that paid off

To Ed Snider, one draft will stand apart from the rest.

It wasn't 1970, when the Flyers selected Bill Clement and Bob Kelly. It wasn't '72 either, when they picked Bill Barber, Tom Bladon and Jimmy Watson. Nor was it 1982, when the Flyers added Ron Sutter, Ron Hextall and Dave Brown.

1990 brought with it a talent-rich draft, which saw the Flyers pluck Mike Ricci, Chris Simon, Mikael Renberg, Chris Therien, and Tommy Soderstrom.

“Yeah, but we passed up on one guy and he’s still playing,” Snider said.

That would be Jaromir Jagr, who was selected fifth overall by the Pittsburgh Penguins -- right after the Flyers chose Ricci with No. 4. Back then, the Flyers had little faith in whether a Czech player would come to North America. Losing out on Jagr still burns.

In Snider’s mind, the draft that stands out is 1969, when the Flyers did what no other club was willing to do: take a chance on Bob Clarke.

There had already been two previous amateur drafts for the expansion clubs.

“I wasn’t even there in Montreal in 1967 when we got [Serge] Bernier,” Snider said. “The ’67 draft was meaningless. The 1968 draft was meaningless. The Original Six teams kept so many things to themselves, it wasn’t a universal draft. We were picking up scraps.

“The first universal NHL draft was 1969. That’s when we got Bob Clarke. I was at the draft, and I became the reason why we drafted him.”

The late Jerry Melnyk was the Flyers’ scout who discovered Clarke playing in Flin Flon, Manitoba. He was the one credited with bringing Clarke to the Flyers' attention, but it took Snider’s intervention at the draft table on June 11 in Montreal to make it happen.

“In those days, the original teams didn’t have a full-time western scout,” Snider said. “Don’t ask me why. Yet we did have one in Melnyk and the only reason we did was because Melnyk had a heart attack at training camp and when he recovered we made him a scout in the west.”

Melnyk lived in Edmonton. He not only scouted Clarke, but did his homework on finding out how Clarke’s diabetes would affect him if he had to endure the rigors of travel playing close to 80 games a season.

“Jerry had gone to the trouble to go to Clarke’s doctors to find out if he could play professionally even though he was a diabetic,” Snider said. “No one else did that. Everybody was afraid of him because he was a diabetic.”

The 1969 draft at the Queen Elizabeth hotel represented Snider’s first in-person appearance at a draft.

“This was my first draft experience … I didn’t know anything about anything,” Snider said. “Bud Poile was the GM and had a friend who recommended we draft Bob Currier, who no one really knew anything about.”

The Flyers chose Currier with the sixth pick.

“Everybody’s eyebrows went up at the table,” Snider said. “Everybody was going crazy. No one said anything. But I saw the atmosphere. No one could believe we took Currier. Jerry Melnyk looked like he was going to have another heart attack.”

Snider turned to his coach and future GM, Keith Allen, and whispered, 'Jerry looks like he is going nuts. Go talk to him and find out what this is all about.’”

Allen came back minutes later and told Snider that Melnyk felt strongly about a kid from Flin Flon named Bobby Clarke.

“Keith said to me, ‘Jerry thinks this kid will step in and be our best player,’” Snider said. “And we took Currier. I said, ‘Tell Bud about this and then I want you to check out this kid with your own sources.’”

Allen had played in the Western Hockey League years earlier and had good scouting sources scattered about Canada. Allen told Snider his sources said Clarke was “sensational,” but teams were leery of his illness.

“I told Keith, ‘Tell Poile to take him in the second round if he’s still available,’” Snider said.

That produced an argument at the draft table because Poile had already taken a center in Currier and didn’t want another centerman.

“Finally, I had to say, ‘You will pick Bob Clarke,'” Snider said. “I didn’t want to do that, I didn’t know anything, I was still a novice. Poile didn’t like me from that day on, but it worked out.”

Clarke, long since retired as the organization’s senior vice president, would become the greatest Flyer ever and deliver two Stanley Cups.

He still holds the club’s all-time marks in assists (852), points (1,210), games played (1,144) as well as shorthanded goals (32).

Flyers recall forward Taylor Leier from Lehigh Valley

Flyers recall forward Taylor Leier from Lehigh Valley

The Flyers on Tuesday made an unexpected roster move, recalling forward Taylor Leier from the Lehigh Valley Phantoms. The 22-year-old will be available for Tuesday night's game against the visiting Buffalo Sabres (see game notes).

Now the question is: Why the call-up?

There were no reports of injuries following Monday's 3-1 loss to the Canadiens. But knowing the secretive nature of hockey injuries, it's possible a Flyer was indeed nicked up in Montreal.

It's also entirely possible that the upper-body injury to Michael Raffl, who hasn't played in a week's time since leaving the 7-4 loss to the Blackhawks in Chicago, is more serious than originally thought and needs more time to heal. The Flyers could place Raffl on long-term injury reserve retroactive to last Tuesday. That would free up a roster spot and make room for Leier.

This will not be Leier's first stint with the Flyers. Along with Shayne Gostisbehere, he was called up last November and made his debut in a Nov. 14 win in Carolina. He played six games in the NHL before he was sent back down to Lehigh Valley for the rest of season. Leier did not record a point with the Flyers last season and averaged 7:43 of ice time a night.

In three games with the Phantoms this season, the 2012 fourth-round draft pick of the Flyers has three assists. Leier scored 20 goals for the Phantoms last season, including a team-high 10 power-play goals.

Leier will wear No. 58 for the Flyers. It remains to be seen if he will crack Tuesday's lineup.

Flyers-Sabres 5 things: Forget about Monday's final result

Flyers-Sabres 5 things: Forget about Monday's final result

Flyers vs. Sabres
7:30 p.m. on CSN, Pregame Live starts at 6:30

After a hard-luck 3-1 loss in Montreal to the Canadiens on Monday, the Flyers (2-3-1) return home Tuesday to the Wells Fargo Center to face the Buffalo Sabres (1-2-1) for the first time this season.

The Sabres are struggling early on this year, so Tuesday night could be a prime opportunity for the Flyers to get back on the winning side of things.

Let’s take a closer look at the matchup.

1. It’s a new day
Despite the result, the fact of the matter is the Flyers played a very good road game on Monday in Montreal against the Habs. Shots on goal were just about even (Montreal held a 33-32 advantage) and the Flyers had excellent opportunities to tie late in the game, but a fully healthy Carey Price had other ideas. Steve Mason was great with 31 saves, many of the difficult variety, and he had no chance on Brendan Gallagher’s winning deflection late in the third. It was a seesaw battle and the Habs wound up on top when the final buzzer sounded. It goes that way sometimes.

But Tuesday is a new day, and the Flyers have a chance strike right back against the Sabres. Forget Monday’s final result. If the Flyers play the way they did Monday, they’re going to win plenty of games.

“Overall we played a pretty good game,” head coach Dave Hakstol said after Monday’s loss. “Certainly we can do better, obviously not coming out with the points. We’ve got to turn the page real quick and get ready to go for a home game tomorrow night some 19 to 20 hours from now.”

Even though Monday night’s result is still fresh, sometimes it’s good to get right back out there and try and keep the momentum of strong play going.

And the Flyers will get some reinforcements on the blue line Tuesday as Radko Gudas will return from his six-game suspension and be in the lineup. No word yet on who will sit.

2. Can’t stop Jake
Move aside Matt Read and Wayne Simmonds. Jake Voracek is the new hottest Flyer.

With his slick deflection on Monday, Voracek now has three goals in his last two games and is riding a four-game point streak. As matter of fact, he has a point in all but one of the Flyers’ six games this season. He’s posted three goals and five assists for eight points so far, which is tied for fourth in the NHL in the early going.

Perhaps most encouraging about Voracek’s play early is the fact that he’s shooting the puck frequently. A natural passer, the 27-year-old forward has 21 shots on goal so far this year, which ties him for 10th most in the league. He has a nice shot when he wants to use it and he’s certainly using it this year.

Considering Voracek’s struggles last season, it has to feel good for him to get off to this kind of solid start. And it has to be reassuring for Hakstol and the Flyers. The second line with Voracek, Sean Couturier and Travis Konecny is playing well as a unit, too.

3. What’s up with Buffalo?
Things got off on the wrong foot, almost literally, for the Sabres the day before the regular season started when stud sophomore and franchise pivot Jack Eichel went down during practice with a high ankle sprain. He’s likely out for about another month or so.

And things haven’t gotten much better as the Sabres have scored just 11 goals in four games this season. Those 11 goals are tied for second least in the entire league and six of them came in one game in Edmonton. It’s tough to judge the Sabres based on the small sample size of games they’ve played so far, but it’s not a good sign when more than half of a team’s goals come in one game.

Starting goalie Robin Lehner is out of Tuesday’s game with an undisclosed illness. Backup Anders Nilsson will make his first start of the regular season. Nilsson has played in three games against the Flyers in his career and owns a 2-0-0 record against them with a 2.26 goals-against average and .906 save percentage.

4. Keep an eye on
Flyers: Brayden Schenn has had the Sabres’ number with six goals against them in 14 career games. That said, Schenn is still trying to find his footing this season as he’s pointless in three games since returning from his three-game suspension that opened his season. Tuesday could be a perfect time for the Flyers’ 24-year-old forward to have the breakout game he’s been looking for.

Sabres: Buffalo’s offense begins and ends with Ryan O’Reilly. He leads the Sabres with three goals this season and is tied for the team lead in points with five. He’s got nine points (six goals and three assists) in 10 career meetings with the Flyers.

5. This and that
• The Flyers went 1-1-1 last season against the Sabres. The Sabres did win in Philadelphia in overtime last October.

• The Sabres enter Philadelphia on the end of a four-game road trip that saw them tour Western Canada. But the Sabres have had four days off while the Flyers played Monday night in Montreal and had to travel home.

• The Flyers haven’t lost to the Sabres at home in regulation in the regular season since March 5, 2011.

• The Flyers have been lethal in the second period this season, scoring 13 of their 20 goals.

• He hasn't found the back of the net yet this year, but Claude Giroux comes into Tuesday’s matchup on a five-game point streak with six assists over that stretch.