Brayden Schenn bails out Luke Schenn in win

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Brayden Schenn bails out Luke Schenn in win

VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- When Brayden Schenn scored the goal that snapped his 16-game goalless drought Monday night, his brother Luke might have been more relieved than he was.

Luke Schenn, technically, scored the Canucks’ third-period go-ahead goal, as the rebound of Daniel Sedin’s shot deflected off him and past goalie Steve Mason. But it was his brother who scored with 47 seconds left in regulation to tie the game and push the Flyers to an eventual 4-3 shootout victory (see game story).

“He said, ‘Thanks for bailing me out,’” Brayden Schenn said. “He said, ‘I got one and you got one.’ It feels good to get a game-tyer.”

Brayden started this season rather strong, at one point leading the Flyers in points. Since then, he’s cooled off significantly. He’s had a rough stretch that included a scary hit from Capitals forward Tom Wilson.

On Monday, though, he was able to come through for his teammates and his brother.

“They always have their backs, and tonight they proved it,” Claude Giroux said. “It’s good for Brayden to get that goal. He was telling me before the game how it just won’t go in for him. He did what he does best, he went to the net and the puck was right there. Looks like an easy goal, but you’ve got to go to the net to get those goals.”

All along, Schenn approached his goalless drought with a maturity beyond his 22 years. He knew he was doing the right things, that it was only a matter of time before he’d finally get one.

Scoring his first goal since Nov. 23, though, was a big relief.

“It feels good,” Schenn said. “Long overdue. Monkey off the back. Obviously a weight lifted off your shoulders when you don’t score and however many games it was, you tend to think out there a little more than normal and hopefully I can keep it going.”

Mason, it should be noted, didn’t criticize Luke Schenn for Sedin’s goal. But he said it was nice to see one Schenn come through for the other.

“A little brotherly love there,” Mason said. “Luke’s just trying to get back to the net there, I was putting my rebound where I wanted to, and it was just an unfortunate bounce. Things like that happen. It’s unfortunate that it put us in that position, but we were able to come out of it, so that’s good.”

Loose pucks
The Flyers allowed a season-high 44 shots in their win in Vancouver. ... Michael Raffl registered two assists two days after scoring the shootout winner in Edmonton. ... Mason has won five starts in a row and has gone eight consecutive starts without a regulation loss.

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

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The Associated Press

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

Bill Dineen, who had the distinction of being Eric Lindros’ first NHL coach, died early Saturday morning at his home in Lake George, New York. He was 84.
 
“Such a wonderful person, who got along with everybody,” Flyers president Paul Holmgren said. “I never played for him, but worked with him in scouting. Just a great guy.” 
 
Dineen succeeded Holmgren as head coach during the 1991-92 season.
 
“When I got fired, a lot of our guys were squeezing their sticks,” Holmgren said. “They were tight. It shouldn’t be hard to play the game. When things got tough, they were a little under stress, Billy coming in, he loosened things up.”
 
Dineen coached parts of two seasons here from 1991-92 through the 1992-93 season, which was Lindros’ first year as a Flyer.
 
“Bill treated everyone with the utmost respect,” Holmgren said. “He was the perfect guy for Eric coming in here. That respect goes both ways. He was almost a grandfatherly figure for Eric at the time.”

Dineen served as a scout with the organization from 1990-91 until succeeding Holmgren as coach. He then returned to a scouting role in 1993-94 and remained with the Flyers as a scout through 1996-97.
 
Mark Howe, one of the greatest Flyers defensemen of all-time, played for Dineen as an 18-year-old rookie in the WHA with the Houston Aeros (1973-74), and also had him during his final year as a Flyer in 1991-92.
 
“He was one of the best people I ever met in the game of hockey,” Howe said. “He was a real players coach. Of all the guys I ever played for. Maybe a little Paul Holmgren, too. 
 
“If you lost the game, he was one of the very few people if you went for a bite to eat or a beer after the game you lost, you actually felt poorly for letting the coach down.”
 
Howe said Dineen’s teams weren’t all about skill.
 
“He picked people that were about ‘the team,'” Howe said. “He made me earn my spot that first year in Houston.”
 
Dineen posted a 60-60-20 record with the Flyers. His son, Kevin, played on both of those teams before assuming the captaincy from Rick Tocchet in 1993-94. 
 
A gentleman behind the bench, Bill Dineen was much the same person as a player. A former right wing who spent the majority of his six-year playing career with the Detroit Red Wings, he had just 122 penalty minutes in 322 games, scoring 51 goals and 95 points.
 
“I knew Billy for a long time," Flyers senior vice president Bob Clarke said. "He was a player and coach at the minor league level and the NHL level, but I think more importantly he was a really, really good hockey person and really good person.” 

Dineen won two WHA titles coaching the Aeros and two Stanley Cups as a player with the Red Wings. A member of the AHL Hall of Fame, Dineen also coached the Adirondack Red Wings from 1983 through 1988-89.
 
Three of his five sons — Gordon, Peter and Kevin — played in the NHL. Sons Shawn and Jerry had their roots in the AHL. 
 
“His boys are scattered all over the map,” Holmgren said. “Just a tremendous hockey family.”
 
Dineen is part of Flyer folklore trivia. He, along with Keith Allen and Vic Stasiuk, were all Red Wings teammates during 1953-53. They also shared something else in common: all three later  became Flyers head coaches.

Flyers reveal 2017 Stadium Series jerseys

Flyers reveal 2017 Stadium Series jerseys

Back in black.

The Flyers on Saturday morning revealed their 2017 Stadium Series jerseys for their Feb. 25 outdoor game against the Pittsburgh Penguins at Heinz Field.

With their 50th anniversary sweaters resembling their current away jerseys with gold outlining throughout, the Flyers have gone back to black and orange for the outdoor game.

The jersey is almost all black, with an orange name plate and an orange elbow stripe. Orange is sprinkled throughout the jersey.

In addition to the outdoor game, the Flyers will also wear the jersey against the Penguins on March 15 at the Wells Fargo Center, a Wednesday Night Rivalry game.

Pittsburgh unveiled its Stadium Series jersey back on Nov. 25, an all gold uniform in celebration of its 50th season.