Do the Flyers believe they're a good team?

flyersbumming-slideshow-usa.jpg

Do the Flyers believe they're a good team?

Does anyone believe in the Flyers? Do the Flyers believe in themselves? Where’s Dr. Phil when you need him?
 
Flyers captain Claude Giroux says the team’s overall confidence level is so low right now, players no longer see themselves as being a good team.
 
Ask any fans out there and they’ll tell you the Flyers are a bad team with good players who simply can’t score and, thus, can’t win games.
 
This is a week when the Flyers should pile up some points with Carolina, New Jersey (Thursday) and Edmonton (Saturday) awaiting them.
 
They left a point on the ice in Carolina, but if the Flyers can get the next four, it might get them back into the playoff picture within the standings.
 
“We need to get points and we can’t fall back too far in the standings, even if we’re not too far from a playoff spot,” Giroux said.
 
“It’s hard to say, but we need to stay positive. We’re a good team. When we start believing it and we start playing like it, we’re gonna be a dangerous team.”
 
So players on the current roster don’t believe?
 
“Maybe they believe it, but we need to believe it 100 percent,” Giroux said. “When we start talking about it and doing it better -- I really believe that when we start believing we’re a good team, we’ll start winning games.
 
“We’re not convinced that we are right now, but we are. We’re gonna start winning games soon.”
 
Vinny Lecavalier was Giroux’s linemate until Wednesday when his line was changed. Does he believe?
 
“I don’t think he means we don’t believe,” Lecavalier said. “Everything comes with confidence. Once your confidence is there, I think we do believe we’re a good team. We just need that confidence and the results to do it.
 
“Sometimes, you can play really well, work hard, but if you don’t get results, it’s frustrating. Confidence is everything. If you know you can win, know you can make that next play or make that defensive play or whatever play, if you’re confident about it, usually, good things happen. That comes with results.”
 
Wayne Simmonds, who was bumped down a line and is now with Michael Raffl and Sean Couturier, agreed.
 
“Confidence is a huge thing,” Simmonds said. “When you believe in yourself, I think you are able to make simpler plans and actually be more effective. I think that’s the key. We have to believe in ourselves more.
 
“Because we’re playing good hockey for the better part of games and then when it comes down to crunch time, we make one or two mistakes and that’s the game. And that is hurting us right now.”
 
Believing in themselves will only come when the Flyers start scoring more than one goal a game and can put some W's up on the board.
 
Scott Hartnell’s scoring skid, dating back to last season, ended at 19 games at Carolina. Giroux’s skid is already 20. He doesn’t seem to get very good scoring chances now, nor is he creating good chances with his line.
 
He had one shot in New Jersey and two in Carolina.
 
That’s not going to promote confidence.
 
Giroux’s psyche seems fragile based on his tepid comments in postgame situations. At 25, he is still a young captain facing adversity for the second consecutive season, but this time it’s all around his own game.
 
“He’s always hard [on himself],” Jakub Voracek said. “He always wants to be the best, tries to be the best. He is one of the best. Obviously, if the puck doesn’t go in it’s frustrating. But you want to keep your composure.
 
“That’s why he’s such a good leader, because he’s so tough on himself. He wants the best out of himself and out of everyone else. I’m sure once he gets that next little [goal], everything will get better.”
 
Veteran defenseman Hal Gill, who’s been in the NHL 16 seasons, tried to use some levity to explain things.
 
“Fortunately, I’ve never been in that position -- I’ve been slumping for a while,” Gill said with a smile. “And what helps me … is just hard work. I think he works really hard and that’s all you can ask. For me, I don’t think of a leader as a guy who scores goals, but as someone who does the little things, plays the right way.”
 
Flyers coach Craig Berube has a fairly simple answer to the question of how this team can start believing in itself again.
 
“It … gets changed when you win games,” Berube said.

Ron Hextall: Vegas 'obviously did their homework' on Pierre-Edouard Bellemare

Ron Hextall: Vegas 'obviously did their homework' on Pierre-Edouard Bellemare

Flyers general manager Ron Hextall on Wednesday night reacted to losing alternate captain Pierre-Edouard Bellemare to the Vegas Golden Knights in the NHL expansion draft (see story).

"There were a number of guys I felt like there was a chance we would lose," Hextall said. "And Belly was on that list.

"Vegas obviously did their homework and have themselves a good player. Pierre-Edouard is a character member of our organization and he'll be missed."

Bellemare is the Flyers' second alternate captain to depart the club in the same calendar year. Mark Streit, whose "A" Bellemare inherited, was traded to Pittsburgh via Tampa at the NHL trade deadline.

Streit will likely see his name engraved on the Stanley Cup. The Penguins plan to petition to get his name on the Cup even though Streit did not play in the Final against Nashville.

As for Bellemare, the 32-year-old center was left unprotected by the Flyers last weekend. He signed a two-year contract in March that carries a $1.45 million cap hit per.

Bellemare had 17 goals and 34 points in 237 games in three seasons with the Flyers after signing with the team in June 2014.

"He's a terrific team player and an even better human being," Hextall said. "He was great in the community and he'll be a real nice piece for Vegas."

NHL Notes: Marc-Andre Fleury leads expansion draft selections

NHL Notes: Marc-Andre Fleury leads expansion draft selections

LAS VEGAS -- The Vegas Golden Knights finally have some players to put on the desert ice this fall.

Stanley Cup-winning goalie Marc-Andre Fleury, defensemen Marc Methot and Alexei Emelin, 30-goal scorer Jonathan Marchessault and forwards David Perron and James Neal are among the veterans selected by the Golden Knights in the NHL expansion draft Wednesday night.

Golden Knights owner Bill Foley and general manager George McPhee announced their choices during the NHL's annual postseason awards show at T-Mobile Arena, where Vegas will begin play in the fall.

Fleury took the stage in a Golden Knights jersey to wild cheers from his new home fans. The three-time Cup winner lost his starting job with the back-to-back champion Penguins, but he'll get to start over in the desert with two years on his contract.

The picks included defensemen Trevor van Riemsdyk and Brayden McNabb, forward Oscar Lindberg.

The Golden Knights also announced additional acquisitions of a handful of veterans and free agents, including Anaheim defenseman Shea Theodore and Florida forward Reilly Smith.

The NHL wrote its draft rules to give the Golden Knights more opportunities to compete early in their existence, and their expansion draft choices certainly appear to form a solid core that could make noise in the Pacific Division.

"They're way past getting off the ground," Nashville general manager David Poile said. "I think this is by far the best expansion team ever" (see full story).

Oilers: 20-year-old McDavid wins Hart Trophy
LAS VEGAS -- Connor McDavid has won his first Hart Trophy. Hardly anybody in hockey believes it will be his last.

The Edmonton captain claimed the award as the NHL's most valuable player Wednesday night at the league's postseason awards show at T-Mobile Arena, the new home of the expansion Vegas Golden Knights.

The league also revealed the results of the Golden Knights' expansion draft to an arena filled with new fans of the NHL's 31st franchise.

McDavid also won the Ted Lindsay Award, given to the league's most outstanding performer in a vote of his fellow players.

The honors capped a remarkable sophomore season for the 20-year-old center, who won the scoring title and led the Oilers back to the Stanley Cup playoffs after an 11-year absence. The former No. 1 pick beat out fellow finalists Sergei Bobrovsky of Columbus and Pittsburgh's Sidney Crosby.

"I'm so proud to be in Edmonton," McDavid said. "I'm so proud to be an Oiler, and so proud to play with the guys."

McDavid is the third-youngest player to win the award. Only Crosby and Wayne Gretzky claimed the Hart as teenagers (see full story).

NHL: Home openers announced; Golden Knights’ 1st game in Dallas
The expansion Vegas Golden Knights will make their regular-season debut on the road in Dallas on Oct. 6 and host the Arizona Coyotes on Oct. 10 in the first home game in franchise history.

NHL teams announced their home openers Wednesday with the full, 1,271-game schedule for the 2017-18 season set to be released Thursday.

Vegas will play its first two games on the road, visiting Arizona on Oct. 7 before the second leg of an early back-to-back for coach Gerard Gallant's club.

The Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins will raise another banner and begin their quest for a three-peat Oct. 4 against the St. Louis Blues. The Penguins visit the Chicago Blackhawks on Oct. 5 in a matchup of the only teams to win the Cup three times in the salary-cap era.

The Western Conference-champion Nashville Predators open the season Oct. 5 at Boston. Nashville celebrates the longest playoff run in franchise history at home Oct. 10 against the Philadelphia Flyers.

Philadelphia opens Oct. 4 at the San Jose Sharks, who have the longest active season-opener winning streak at seven. The first night of the season also includes the Calgary Flames at the Edmonton Oilers and the Toronto Maple Leafs at the Winnipeg Jets, a matchup of the top two picks in the 2016 draft, Auston Matthews against Patrik Laine.

The Detroit Red Wings host Minnesota on Oct. 5 in the first NHL regular-season game at the new Little Caesars Arena.

The back-to-back Presidents' Trophy-winning Washington Capitals open their season at Ottawa on Oct. 5 and host the Montreal Canadiens in their home opener Oct. 7