Flyers free-agent target: Dan Boyle

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Flyers free-agent target: Dan Boyle

Each day from now until July 1, the day free agency begins, Sarah Baicker and Tim Riday will profile some of the NHL's top impending free agents and project their likelihood of signing with the Flyers.

Dan Boyle, defenseman
Age: 37
Height: 5-11
Weight: 190
Last team: New York Islanders
2013-14 cap hit: $6.6 million

Scouting report
Boyle, who signed with the Florida Panthers in 1998 after going undrafted out of Miami University, is one of the smoothest puck-moving defensemen in the NHL. He's consistently produced offensively throughout his 16-year career, eclipsing 30 or more points nine times. And, despite his small stature, he's no slouch in his own end. The veteran blueliner has also shined on hockey's biggest stages. He helped the Tampa Bay Lightning hoist the Stanley Cup in 2004 and was a key contributor for Team Canada in the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, where he won his first and only gold medal.

Last season in San Jose, Boyle had 12 goals and 24 assists in 75 games, but the Sharks announced after the season that he wouldn't be returning. San Jose traded his rights to the New York Islanders earlier this month in exchange for a conditional 2015 fifth-round pick. Talks between the Isles and Boyle have reportedly broken down and the team is now hoping to deal his rights before free agency opens on July 1.

Baicker's projection
Paul Holmgren always seemed to have a thing for signing these aging veterans to deals that were for too much and too long (see: Mark Streit). I have a gut feeling that Ron Hextall will look to move away from such signings, and for that reason, I don't see the Flyers acquiring Boyle this offseason, even though the Flyers' interest in him at last season's trade deadline was well publicized. Yes, he's a workhorse, and yes, he's steady in both ends of the ice. But at 37 and coming off a $6.6 million cap hit, I just don't think he's worth it. The Flyers already signed an undersized aging veteran this offseason in Kimmo Timonen, and he came at a discount. No need to add another.

Riday's projection
You can argue Boyle's career is on the decline, but he's still more than capable of playing a big role on any team's blue line. At 37 years old, you can put your money on Boyle signing with a contender. He only has a few more years left in the tank at best and he'd like another shot at the Cup before hanging up the skates. As Sarah mentioned above, the Flyers have already inked Timonen this offseason, so I wouldn't expect Ron Hextall to make signing another veteran toward the end of his career a priority. Boyle would certainly be an upgrade, but his price tag could be too high. Don't forget, the Flyers have three defensive prospects -- Shayne Gostisbehere, Robert Hagg and Sam Morin -- who will likely get a serious look in camp. The Flyers, especially Hextall, seem more interested in finding out if any of the youngsters are NHL-ready than anything else.

Ron Hextall, Flyers know what they have in Nolan Patrick

Ron Hextall, Flyers know what they have in Nolan Patrick

CHICAGO — Ron Hextall had no idea which way New Jersey Devils general manager Ray Shero was leaning.

Would Shero take Nolan Patrick or Nico Hischier with his No. 1 pick?

"I asked Ray 10 minutes before he picked and he wouldn't tell me," Hextall said. "I give him credit. That is what he should have done … I didn't have an expectation one way or the other."

Shero wanted a dynamic player to put bodies in the stands at Prudential Center. He chose Hischier.

That made it easy for Hextall at No. 2 to select Patrick (see story).

If rumors were true that Shero was scared off by Patrick's several injuries this past season at Brandon, well, the Flyers weren't.

"What I believe, we gather a lot of information," Hextall said. "There's some stuff out there you want to prove wrong and we did. We're comfortable with the injury part of it. He is a really good young man."

Patrick is a two-way player and a natural center. The Flyers have seven centers right now (see story), including Patrick, who is expected to play now. 

Hextall said he doesn't envision switching Patrick to the wing.

"I would rather have too many centers rather than five wingers on each side and no one to go in the middle," Hextall said.

Interesting that German Rubtsov, last year's top pick for the Flyers, has already been converted to a left winger since coming to North America to play junior.

Will Patrick be a No. 1 center as scouts project?

"Nolan has to answer that," Hextall said. "We see a kid with a big body, extremely high hockey sense, really good skill set. You get drafted today? The work starts now and Nolan has to put the work in.

"This is another level … this is the National Hockey League. In September, he comes to camp. He needs a big summer."

Ron Hextall on Flyers' logjam of centers: 'Someone has to play the wing'

Ron Hextall on Flyers' logjam of centers: 'Someone has to play the wing'

CHICAGO – The Flyers already have a familiar problem coming out of this NHL draft and heading training camp next fall: they’re too deep at center.
 
Friday night, they added three centers and traded another.
 
Brayden Schenn was sent to St. Louis for the Blues’ 27th pick in the first round, plus a conditional 2018 first-round pick and veteran utility center Jori Lehtera (see story).
 
General manager Ron Hextall wanted to trade back into the first round late and he did so by tabbing Morgan Frost at No. 27 with that Blues’ pick.
 
NHL Central Scouting had Frost ranked 31st among North American skaters. He is a 6-0, 170-pound forward from Aurora, Ontario.
 
He has raw speed and skill, but scouts say other parts of his game will need time to fill out. Frost had 20 goals and 62 points for the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds of the OHL this past season.
 
Friday’s other first-round pick, Nolan Patrick, is a natural centerman. Patrick is expected to play in the NHL this season. So right now, the Flyers’ centers are Claude Giroux, Sean Couturier, Valtteri Filppula, Mike Vecchione, plus Patrick and now Lehtera.
 
Lehtera had 30 goals and 100 points in 218 games with the Blues. He was both a first- and second-line center for the Blues this past season despite weak numbers — seven goals and 22 points in 64 games.
 
He is a decent playmaker and two-way player, who has centered Alex Steen and Vladimir Tarasenko.
 
“He is utility guy with a well-rounded game and can play in the middle,” Hextall said. “We like the player. Gives coach more options.”
 
Best option: Lehtera can move to left wing if needed.
 
“Someone has to play the wing,” Hextall said. “He can play the wing. Our scouts have seen him play the wing, but he plays center most games. I am assuming he prefers center like most of them. Someone has to play wing.”
 
Schenn had improved every year he was with the Flyers, but too much of his scoring is on the power play and not five-on-five. He had 109 goals and 246 points in 424 career games for the Flyers.
 
This deal seems strange unless you consider the Flyers got another first-round pick (Frost) and a top-10 protected, conditional first-rounder next year. The Blues have the option to defer the 2018 first-rounder to 2019 but if they do so, the Flyers will also receive the Blues' 2020 third-round pick.
 
“It was a combination,” Hextall said of the advantages’ from the Flyers side. “It was one of those [trades] that came out of nowhere. Not like we were shopping Brayden.
 
“This deal came along and we really like the draft next year. We like the late pick this year and Jori. It made sense and we got a couple more young players.”
 
Young players like Frost, whom the Flyers are excited about.
 
“Our whole staff really liked the guy,” Hextall said. “He’s an extremely intelligent player, his No. 1 asset. Really smart. Reads the ice well. He has a very deft touch moving the puck.
 
“Good two-way player who showed up good in the testing. We believe he is a kid with a lot of upside. Good speed, but he dissects the game better than most players.”
 
Frost’s father Andy was the longtime former Toronto Maple Leafs PA announcer.
 
“I talked to them a couple times,” Frost said. “I’d say I had a bit of a gut feeling. I wasn’t too sure, but they took me and I’m super happy about it.
 
“I think first and foremost I’m a playmaker. I think I’m a high-skilled player that likes to use his vision and hockey sense to create plays. I’m working on becoming more of a two-way forward. That’s more of the player I want to become.”